For Cabbage Lovers

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Jmcquown, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of Southern Living. Since I like to keep it
    simple, this one caught my eye. I'll be preparing this tomorrow.

    Cabbage with Garlic

    1 small cabbage (about 2 lbs.) 6 garlic cloves, finely sliced 3 Tbs. olive oil
    1/2 c. chicken broth 1 tsp. course or kosher salt freshly ground pepper to taste

    Remove the outside leaves and stalk from cabbage. [My note; this is fun - slam the cabbage firmly
    down on the stalk on the counter or cutting board, then pull the stalk free off the leaves.] Cut
    into 4 wedges. Saute the garlic in hot oil in an ovenproof skillet over medium heat until golden.
    Add the cabbage, cut side down; cook 5 minutes. Turn to other cut sides and cook 2-3 minutes. Stir
    in broth and sprinkle evenly with salt. Bake at 350F for 20-25 minutes or until crisp-tender.
    Sprinkle evenly with pepper. Serve immediately.

    More of my notes: I'd cook this in a slightly deeper oven-safe pan - I have a nice Lodge cast iron
    'chicken cooker' pan. And I'd add a bit more liquid, perhaps even a bit of nice dry white wine. If I
    wanted the cabbage crisp-tender I'd stir fry it, not brown and then bake it. But that's just
    me.

    Also, since the cabbage is cooked in the oil after the garlic is cooked for about 8 minutes I
    wouldn't cook the garlic until "golden" necessarily; depending on your stove/oil temp it the garlic
    may easily go from golden to brown. Again, that's just me.

    Jill
     
    Tags:


  2. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    > "jmcquown" writes:
    >
    >There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of Southern Living. Since I like to keep it
    >simple, this one caught my eye. I'll be preparing this tomorrow.
    >
    >Cabbage with Garlic
    >
    >1 small cabbage (about 2 lbs.) 6 garlic cloves, finely sliced 3 Tbs. olive oil
    >1/2 c. chicken broth 1 tsp. course or kosher salt freshly ground pepper to taste
    >
    >Remove the outside leaves and stalk from cabbage. [My note; this is fun - slam the cabbage firmly
    >down on the stalk on the counter or cutting board, then pull the stalk free off the leaves.]

    Jill, you must be built like a young Arrrrnold... with iceberg lettuce okay, but I seriously doubt
    any mere mortals can accomplish that feat with a head of cabbage.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  3. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    PENMART01 wrote:
    >> "jmcquown" writes:
    >>
    >> There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of Southern Living. Since I like to keep
    >> it simple, this one caught my eye. I'll be preparing this tomorrow.
    >>
    >> Cabbage with Garlic
    >>
    >> 1 small cabbage (about 2 lbs.) 6 garlic cloves, finely sliced 3 Tbs. olive oil
    >> 1/2 c. chicken broth 1 tsp. course or kosher salt freshly ground pepper to taste
    >>
    >> Remove the outside leaves and stalk from cabbage. [My note; this is fun - slam the cabbage firmly
    >> down on the stalk on the counter or cutting board, then pull the stalk free off the leaves.]
    >
    > Jill, you must be built like a young Arrrrnold... with iceberg lettuce okay, but I seriously doubt
    > any mere mortals can accomplish that feat with a head of cabbage.
    >
    >
    > Sheldon ````````````
    Puleeeze! I don't eat lettuce. With a fresh green cabbage (probably the smaller ones) it is easily
    accomplished. Although, I find with all the ingredients set out on the counter, it is easier to
    quarter the cabbage and V-cut out the stalk with a sharp chefs knife. I like a bit of the stalk left
    along the center of the quarters, anyway, to hold the quarters together when cooking.

    I'm thinking this would also make one hell of a dish if a couple of diced potatoes were added to the
    pan (remember, I'd rather use a pan with more depth). There's a name for it (not bubble & squeak,
    but something rather similar).

    How's them kitties doing?

    Jill
     
  4. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    Brush cabbage wedges with olive oil, salt, and pepper (or whatever you like) and grill on the BBQ or
    your grill pan. Easily, delicious, good for you.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----
    Louis Cohen Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8' 42.8"

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hZP%[email protected]...
    > There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of Southern Living. Since I like to keep it
    > simple, this one caught my eye. I'll be preparing this tomorrow.
    >
    > Cabbage with Garlic
    >
    > 1 small cabbage (about 2 lbs.) 6 garlic cloves, finely sliced 3 Tbs. olive oil
    > 1/2 c. chicken broth 1 tsp. course or kosher salt freshly ground pepper to taste
    >
    > Remove the outside leaves and stalk from cabbage. [My note; this is fun - slam the cabbage firmly
    > down on the stalk on the counter or cutting board, then pull the stalk free off the leaves.] Cut
    > into 4 wedges. Saute the garlic in hot oil in an ovenproof skillet over medium heat until golden.
    > Add the cabbage, cut side down; cook 5 minutes. Turn to other cut sides
    and
    > cook 2-3 minutes. Stir in broth and sprinkle evenly with salt. Bake at 350F for 20-25 minutes or
    > until crisp-tender. Sprinkle evenly with
    pepper.
    > Serve immediately.
    >
    > More of my notes: I'd cook this in a slightly deeper oven-safe pan - I
    have
    > a nice Lodge cast iron 'chicken cooker' pan. And I'd add a bit more
    liquid,
    > perhaps even a bit of nice dry white wine. If I wanted the cabbage crisp-tender I'd stir fry it,
    > not brown and then bake it. But that's just
    > me.
    >
    > Also, since the cabbage is cooked in the oil after the garlic is cooked
    for
    > about 8 minutes I wouldn't cook the garlic until "golden" necessarily; depending on your stove/oil
    > temp it the garlic may easily go from golden
    to
    > brown. Again, that's just me.
    >
    > Jill
     
  5. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hZP%[email protected]...
    : There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of
    Southern Living.
    : Since I like to keep it simple, this one caught my eye. I'll
    be preparing
    : this tomorrow.
    :
    : Cabbage with Garlic
    :
    :
    <snipping lovely recipe>

    That reminds me... I'm making Colcannon (sp?) next month to go with our little Irish fest.

    Corned Beef Colcannon Guiness Carrots Baked Parsnips Irish Soda Bread Irish Glazed Tea Cake

    Woo-Hoo! Can hardly wait!
    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  6. "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:hZP%[email protected]:

    > There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of Southern Living. Since I like to keep it
    > simple, this one caught my eye. I'll be preparing this tomorrow.
    >
    > Cabbage with Garlic
    >
    > 1 small cabbage (about 2 lbs.) 6 garlic cloves, finely sliced 3 Tbs. olive oil
    > 1/2 c. chicken broth 1 tsp. course or kosher salt freshly ground pepper to taste
    >
    > Remove the outside leaves and stalk from cabbage. [My note; this is fun - slam the cabbage firmly
    > down on the stalk on the counter or cutting board, then pull the stalk free off the leaves.] Cut
    > into 4 wedges. Saute the garlic in hot oil in an ovenproof skillet over medium heat until golden.
    > Add the cabbage, cut side down; cook 5 minutes. Turn to other cut sides and cook 2-3 minutes. Stir
    > in broth and sprinkle evenly with salt. Bake at 350F for 20-25 minutes or until crisp-tender.
    > Sprinkle evenly with pepper. Serve immediately.
    >
    > More of my notes: I'd cook this in a slightly deeper oven-safe pan - I have a nice Lodge cast iron
    > 'chicken cooker' pan. And I'd add a bit more liquid, perhaps even a bit of nice dry white wine. If
    > I wanted the cabbage crisp-tender I'd stir fry it, not brown and then bake it. But that's just me.
    >
    > Also, since the cabbage is cooked in the oil after the garlic is cooked for about 8 minutes I
    > wouldn't cook the garlic until "golden" necessarily; depending on your stove/oil temp it the
    > garlic may easily go from golden to brown. Again, that's just me.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >
    >

    Sounds good, Jill, but I have to ask...were there any "creamed cabbage" recipes in that article?

    I love Southern Living Magazine and subscribed to it for about 15 years. Also have 2 decades of
    their annual cookbooks, but I finally had to stop.
    <G>

    Wayne
     
  7. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in news:hZP%[email protected]:
    >
    >> There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of Southern Living. Since I like to keep
    >> it simple, this one caught my eye. I'll be preparing this tomorrow.
    >>
    >> Cabbage with Garlic
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>
    >
    > Sounds good, Jill, but I have to ask...were there any "creamed cabbage" recipes in that article?
    >
    > I love Southern Living Magazine and subscribed to it for about 15 years. Also have 2 decades of
    > their annual cookbooks, but I finally had to stop. <G>
    >
    > Wayne

    I searched their site and found this:

    Creamed Cabbage

    2 tablespoons butter or margarine 40 saltine crackers, crushed 1 large cabbage, shredded
    1/2 cup water 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper
    2/4 cup butter or margarine
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups milk

    Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a skillet over medium heat; add crackers, and saute until browned.
    Remove from skillet, and set aside. Bring cabbage and 1/2 cup water to a boil in a large saucepan.
    Cover and cook 5 to 7 minutes or until tender; drain. Stir in salt and pepper; keep warm.

    Melt 1/4 cup butter in skillet over low heat; whisk in flour until smooth. Cook, whisking
    constantly, 1 minute. Gradually add milk; cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, until
    thickened and bubbly. Stir sauce and crackers into cabbage. 8 to 10 servings

    and

    Scalloped Cabbage

    2 cups crushed cornflakes cereal
    4/4 cup butter or margarine, melted 1 (10-ounce) package shredded angel hair cabbage 1 large sweet
    onion, halved and thinly sliced
    5/2 cup milk
    6/2 cup mayonnaise
    6 (1 1/2-ounce) can cream of celery soup, undiluted 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded sharp Cheddar cheese

    Stir together cereal and butter; spoon half of cereal mixture into a lightly greased 11- x 7-inch
    baking dish. Top with cabbage and onion.

    Stir together milk, mayonnaise, and soup; pour over cabbage. Sprinkle with cheese and remaining
    cereal mixture.

    Bake, covered, at 350° for 1 hour.

    Note: To lighten this recipe, use light butter, fat-free milk, reduced fat mayonnaise, reduced-fat
    soup and reduced fat-cheese. 6 to 8 servings

    Jill
     
  8. "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in news:hZP%[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of Southern Living. Since I like to keep
    >>> it simple, this one caught my eye. I'll be preparing this tomorrow.
    >>>
    >>> Cabbage with Garlic
    >>>
    >>> Jill
    >>>
    >>
    >> Sounds good, Jill, but I have to ask...were there any "creamed cabbage" recipes in that article?
    >>
    >> I love Southern Living Magazine and subscribed to it for about 15 years. Also have 2 decades of
    >> their annual cookbooks, but I finally had to stop. <G>
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >
    > I searched their site and found this:
    >
    > Creamed Cabbage
    >
    > 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 40 saltine crackers, crushed 1 large cabbage, shredded
    > 1/2 cup water 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper
    > 1/4 cup butter or margarine
    > 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups milk
    >
    > Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a skillet over medium heat; add crackers, and saute until browned.
    > Remove from skillet, and set aside. Bring cabbage and 1/2 cup water to a boil in a large saucepan.
    > Cover and cook 5 to 7 minutes or until tender; drain. Stir in salt and pepper; keep warm.
    >
    > Melt 1/4 cup butter in skillet over low heat; whisk in flour until smooth. Cook, whisking
    > constantly, 1 minute. Gradually add milk; cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, until
    > thickened and bubbly. Stir sauce and crackers into cabbage. 8 to 10 servings
    >
    > and
    >
    > Scalloped Cabbage
    >
    > 2 cups crushed cornflakes cereal
    > 1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted 1 (10-ounce) package shredded angel hair cabbage 1 large sweet
    > onion, halved and thinly sliced
    > 1/2 cup milk
    > 1/2 cup mayonnaise
    > 1 (10 1/2-ounce) can cream of celery soup, undiluted 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded sharp Cheddar
    > cheese
    >
    > Stir together cereal and butter; spoon half of cereal mixture into a lightly greased 11- x 7-inch
    > baking dish. Top with cabbage and onion.
    >
    > Stir together milk, mayonnaise, and soup; pour over cabbage. Sprinkle with cheese and remaining
    > cereal mixture.
    >
    > Bake, covered, at 350° for 1 hour.
    >
    > Note: To lighten this recipe, use light butter, fat-free milk, reduced fat mayonnaise, reduced-fat
    > soup and reduced fat-cheese. 6 to 8 servings
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >

    Jill, that you SO much for checking finding these for me! Both sound quite good. It didn't occur to
    me that SL had a website with recipes. Duh! I'll have to check it out.

    Thanks, Wayne
     
  9. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>> "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in news:hZP%[email protected]:
    >>>
    >>>> There are a number of cabbage recipes in the new issue of Southern Living. Since I like to keep
    >>>> it simple, this one caught my eye. I'll be preparing this tomorrow.
    >>>>
    >>>> Cabbage with Garlic
    >>>>
    >>>> Jill
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Sounds good, Jill, but I have to ask...were there any "creamed cabbage" recipes in that article?
    >>>
    >>> I love Southern Living Magazine and subscribed to it for about 15 years. Also have 2 decades of
    >>> their annual cookbooks, but I finally had to stop. <G>
    >>>
    >>> Wayne
    >>
    >> I searched their site and found this:
    >>
    >> Creamed Cabbage
    >>
    >> 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 40 saltine crackers, crushed 1 large cabbage, shredded
    >> 1/2 cup water 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper
    >> 1/4 cup butter or margarine
    >> 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups milk
    >>
    >> Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a skillet over medium heat; add crackers, and saute until
    >> browned. Remove from skillet, and set aside. Bring cabbage and 1/2 cup water to a boil in a
    >> large saucepan. Cover and cook 5 to 7 minutes or until tender; drain. Stir in salt and pepper;
    >> keep warm.
    >>
    >> Melt 1/4 cup butter in skillet over low heat; whisk in flour until smooth. Cook, whisking
    >> constantly, 1 minute. Gradually add milk; cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, until
    >> thickened and bubbly. Stir sauce and crackers into cabbage. 8 to 10 servings
    >>
    >> and
    >>
    >> Scalloped Cabbage
    >>
    >> 2 cups crushed cornflakes cereal
    >> 1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted 1 (10-ounce) package shredded angel hair cabbage 1 large
    >> sweet onion, halved and thinly sliced
    >> 1/2 cup milk
    >> 1/2 cup mayonnaise
    >> 1 (10 1/2-ounce) can cream of celery soup, undiluted 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded sharp Cheddar
    >> cheese
    >>
    >> Stir together cereal and butter; spoon half of cereal mixture into a lightly greased 11- x 7-inch
    >> baking dish. Top with cabbage and onion.
    >>
    >> Stir together milk, mayonnaise, and soup; pour over cabbage. Sprinkle with cheese and remaining
    >> cereal mixture.
    >>
    >> Bake, covered, at 350° for 1 hour.
    >>
    >> Note: To lighten this recipe, use light butter, fat-free milk, reduced fat mayonnaise, reduced-
    >> fat soup and reduced fat-cheese. 6 to 8 servings
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>
    >>
    >
    > Jill, that you SO much for checking finding these for me! Both sound quite good. It didn't occur
    > to me that SL had a website with recipes. Duh! I'll have to check it out.
    >
    > Thanks, Wayne

    NOTE: You have to be a current magazine subscriber to access many portions of the site.

    Jill
     
  10. "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Jill, that you SO much for checking finding these for me! Both sound
    >> quite good. It didn't occur to me that SL had a website with recipes. Duh! I'll have to check
    >> it out.
    >>
    >> Thanks, Wayne
    >
    > NOTE: You have to be a current magazine subscriber to access many portions of the site.
    >
    > Jill

    Damn! At least I already have hundreds if not more of their recipes.

    Thanks, Wayne
     
  11. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Jill, that you SO much for checking finding these for me! Both sound
    >>> quite good. It didn't occur to me that SL had a website with recipes. Duh! I'll have to check
    >>> it out.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks, Wayne
    >>
    >> NOTE: You have to be a current magazine subscriber to access many portions of the site.
    >>
    >> Jill
    >
    > Damn! At least I already have hundreds if not more of their recipes.
    >
    > Thanks, Wayne

    I am a subscriber, so ask away! I have some of their books from around 1969-76 books, bought at a
    used bookstore for a $ a piece. I'm sure some of the recipes are great, but some of the photos
    are like from

    http://www.lileks.com/institute/gallery/

    Always a favorite site! Especially cooking with Jell-O! Oh, and MEATS... mush have MEAT! ROFL

    Jill
     
  12. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], PENMART01 at
    [email protected] wrote on 2/27/04 8:19 PM:

    >> "jmcquown"
    >>
    >> PENMART01 wrote:
    >>>> "jmcquown" writes:
    >>>>
    >>>> Remove the outside leaves and stalk from cabbage. [My note; this is fun - slam the cabbage
    >>>> firmly down on the stalk on the counter or cutting board, then pull the stalk free off the
    >>>> leaves.]
    >>>
    >>> Jill, you must be built like a young Arrrrnold... with iceberg lettuce okay, but I seriously
    >>> doubt any mere mortals can accomplish that feat with a head of cabbage.
    >>>
    >
    >> Puleeeze! I don't eat lettuce.
    >
    > Whether you eat lettuce doesn't figure into it.

    We're all supposed to remember she doesn't eat lettuce. Remember, RFC is All About Jill on weekends.

    >
    >> With a fresh green cabbage (probably the smaller ones) it is easily accomplished.
    >
    > Probably now, eh... now we're not so sure, you may not be sure, but I am 100% positive.

    Sorry Jill, you're busted!

    >
    > I grow cabbage. I pick em and prepare em within the hour (can't get fresher), young small heads
    > are my favorite for slaw. I've tried slamming them to remove the core innumerable times, can't be
    > done. Nope, NOT possible with *any* size head cabbage... cabbage just does not have a
    > structure/texture that lends itself to that core removal trick one can easily accomplish with
    > iceberg lettuce.

    I've never tried it except on iceberg lettuce. Would it work with Savoy cabbage? It is a bit softer.
    Still I prefer regular old, pale green cabbage.

    Bought 2 heads today, small ones. One for New England Boiled Dinner tomorrow. And the other for
    sauteed cabbage and onions with noodles (lots of black pepper). What? You want the recipe? Ok, here
    it is: Sauté cabbage and onions (in butter). Add cooked noodles, salt and pepper. Done! Quantities
    as needed.
     
  13. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    > in article [email protected], PENMART01 at [email protected] wrote on
    > 2/27/04 8:19 PM:
    >
    >>> "jmcquown"
    >>>
    >>> PENMART01 wrote:
    >>>>> "jmcquown" writes:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Remove the outside leaves and stalk from cabbage. [My note; this is fun - slam the cabbage
    >>>>> firmly down on the stalk on the counter or cutting board, then pull the stalk free off the
    >>>>> leaves.]
    >>>>
    >>>> Jill, you must be built like a young Arrrrnold... with iceberg lettuce okay, but I seriously
    >>>> doubt any mere mortals can accomplish that feat with a head of cabbage.
    >>>>
    >>
    >>> Puleeeze! I don't eat lettuce.
    >>
    >> Whether you eat lettuce doesn't figure into it.
    >
    > We're all supposed to remember she doesn't eat lettuce. Remember, RFC is All About Jill on
    > weekends.

    F/U Sheryl.
    >>
    >>> With a fresh green cabbage (probably the smaller ones) it is easily accomplished.
    >>
    >> Probably now, eh... now we're not so sure, you may not be sure, but I am 100% positive.
    >
    > Sorry Jill, you're busted!
    >
    >>
    >> I grow cabbage. I pick em and prepare em within the hour (can't get fresher), young small heads
    >> are my favorite for slaw. I've tried slamming them to remove the core innumerable times, can't be
    >> done. Nope, NOT possible with *any* size head cabbage... cabbage just does not have a
    >> structure/texture that lends itself to that core removal trick one can easily accomplish with
    >> iceberg lettuce.
    >
    > I've never tried it except on iceberg lettuce. Would it work with Savoy cabbage? It is a bit
    > softer. Still I prefer regular old, pale green cabbage.
    >
    > Bought 2 heads today, small ones. One for New England Boiled Dinner tomorrow. And the other for
    > sauteed cabbage and onions with noodles (lots of black pepper). What? You want the recipe? Ok,
    > here it is: Sauté cabbage and onions (in butter). Add cooked noodles, salt and pepper. Done!
    > Quantities as needed.
     
  14. "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in news:Bxe0c.5639$6e7.2834
    @bignews1.bellsouth.net:

    > Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >> in article [email protected], PENMART01 at [email protected] wrote on
    >> 2/27/04 8:19 PM:
    >>
    >>>> "jmcquown"
    >>>>
    >>>> PENMART01 wrote:
    >>>>>> "jmcquown" writes:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Remove the outside leaves and stalk from cabbage. [My note; this is fun - slam the cabbage
    >>>>>> firmly down on the stalk on the counter or cutting board, then pull the stalk free off the
    >>>>>> leaves.]
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Jill, you must be built like a young Arrrrnold... with iceberg lettuce okay, but I seriously
    >>>>> doubt any mere mortals can accomplish that feat with a head of cabbage.
    >>>>>
    >>>
    >>>> Puleeeze! I don't eat lettuce.
    >>>
    >>> Whether you eat lettuce doesn't figure into it.
    >>
    >> We're all supposed to remember she doesn't eat lettuce. Remember, RFC is All About Jill on
    >> weekends.
    >
    >
    > F/U Sheryl.

    Now girls! <G>

    >>>
    >>>> With a fresh green cabbage (probably the smaller ones) it is easily accomplished.
    >>>
    >>> Probably now, eh... now we're not so sure, you may not be sure, but I am 100% positive.
    >>
    >> Sorry Jill, you're busted!
    >>
    >>>
    >>> I grow cabbage. I pick em and prepare em within the hour (can't get fresher), young small heads
    >>> are my favorite for slaw. I've tried slamming them to remove the core innumerable times, can't
    >>> be done. Nope, NOT possible with *any* size head cabbage... cabbage just does not have a
    >>> structure/texture that lends itself to that core removal trick one can easily accomplish with
    >>> iceberg lettuce.
    >>
    >> I've never tried it except on iceberg lettuce. Would it work with Savoy cabbage? It is a bit
    >> softer. Still I prefer regular old, pale green cabbage.
    >>
    >> Bought 2 heads today, small ones. One for New England Boiled Dinner tomorrow. And the other for
    >> sauteed cabbage and onions with noodles (lots of black pepper). What? You want the recipe? Ok,
    >> here it is: Sauté cabbage and onions (in butter). Add cooked noodles, salt and pepper. Done!
    >> Quantities as needed.
    >
     
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