For Fabs: My first palmares

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ryan Cousineau, Mar 16, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. If you're bored by long descriptions of Cat 6 race antics, you might want to move on...

    One race, one win. Too bad it was against a bunch of frat boys.

    Actually, it was a neat experience:

    The local university does an annual criterium, and I decided to drop by and try it out. they had
    three categories: recreational, competitive, and elite. This was supposed to be uncategorized
    riders, Cat 5-3, and Cat 1-2. There was also a scheduled fat-tire race that was cancelled.

    Well, I'm no dummy, and I've never even done a club ride before, despite a lot of commuting.
    Recreational it is!

    Turned out the recreational race was the site of some sort of wacky intramural competition between
    two fraternities. Most of the riders were on mountain bikes, some wearing hockey helmets (!), and
    one on a fs!

    Besides me on my fendered Pinarello, there was one guy with a semi-serious looking older road bike,
    and one guy with a pretty decent late-model road bike. STI, the real deal. Hm. Maybe some
    competition.

    So we raced. pack starts out, the three of us lose everyone on an MTB within about 50 metres. The
    guy on the semi serious road bike hangs with us for two laps. Then he disappears.

    So now its two of us. Me on my mutant old Pinarello, with a Sora STI 8v setup and a 105 DT lever for
    the front, pretty chrome fork, and me. The other guy is riding a nice late-model Trek, STI and
    everything, but the Camelbak betrays an off-road bent.

    timed 45-minute race. We hang together now, moving fast. I try a break on him once, get away for
    about a lap. Hm. He can make time on me on the climb, but I lose him on the flat/downhill part of
    the course. Start/finish is halfway up the climb. 1.5 km

    we keep going for a while like this. At one point I look over, and warn him that his front skewer is
    open! Yikes. I tell him I'll wait, motivated both by sportsmanship and a disinclination to watch him
    die when his wheel falls off (weird...I'd actually warned another dude he had his wheel loose at the
    start line, and helped him fix it). He declined my offer, but pulled up to fix the wheel. I carried
    on, but slacked off, basically taking a rolling rest. He caught up again within a lap.

    With about 14 minutes to go, I tried a bit of a break, and made it for a while. But with about three
    laps to go, he's caught up to me at the top of the climb. Gotta work on that "being fat" thing. Bad.
    I definitely don't want this guy with me at the bottom of the hill...

    We come around again. He's right with me the whole lap, and I let him lead me up the climb. He
    tries a half-hearted break, but as long as I'm on his wheel, he's not going anywhere. They ring the
    bell at the start-finish. I remain calm, and we get to the top of the climb, which ends with a
    sharp corner.

    What's that racing strategy Bicycling advocates? Attack at the top of the hill, when everyone
    wants to rest?

    I attacked. Jumped out of the saddle, spun like a loon, banged into the big ring, snapped off
    upshifts like a pro, sprinted until spots danced before my eyes and my HRM to 188 before I stopped
    paying attention. I pedalled the descent, pedalled the flat, and as I rounded the corner to the
    climb, I looked back and couldn't see my nemesis anymore.

    Not sure how much time I had, I kept steady on the pedals, and when I saw the finish line, sprinted
    it. In the end, I actually won by something like 20 or 30 seconds. The second-place guy admitted
    that when I started my sprint at the top of the hill, he had nothing.

    For my trouble, I got an embarrassingly proud t-shirt proclaiming me the UBC Stadium Cycle
    Criterium CHAMPION!

    I dedicate this win to Fabrizio Mazzoleni.

    Then I stayed around for the Competitive race to see how real riders do
    it. I'm gonna do the weekly crits this year. Probably no wins in my immediate future, but it's going
    to be a lot of fun trying.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
    Tags:


  2. easyrider

    easyrider New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2002
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0
    The greatest journey begins with a single step. Congratulations.

    By the way, I can't believe anyone would be allowed to race any kind of race in a damned hockey helmet.
     
  3. Tritonrider

    Tritonrider Guest

    >From: Ryan Cousineau [email protected]

    >For my trouble, I got an embarrassingly proud t-shirt proclaiming me the UBC Stadium Cycle
    >Criterium CHAMPION!
    >
    >I dedicate this win to Fabrizio Mazzoleni.
    >
    >Then I stayed around for the Competitive race to see how real riders do
    >it. I'm gonna do the weekly crits this year. Probably no wins in my immediate future, but it's
    > going to be a lot of fun trying.
    >
    >--
    >Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club

    Cool sounds like a lot of fun. Bill C
     
  4. Tritonrider

    Tritonrider Guest

    >From: easyrider [email protected]

    >By the way, I can't believe anyone would be allowed to race any kind of race in a damned
    >hockey helmet.
    >

    Probably had a camel back full of beer too. You've gotta love higher education. Bill
     
  5. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    Congrats, even to the sportsmanship of waiting for the dude when he had the equipment problem.

    Mike "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If you're bored by long descriptions of Cat 6 race antics, you might want to move on...
    >
    > One race, one win. Too bad it was against a bunch of frat boys.
    >
    > Actually, it was a neat experience:
    >
    > The local university does an annual criterium, and I decided to drop by and try it out. they had
    > three categories: recreational, competitive, and elite. This was supposed to be uncategorized
    > riders, Cat 5-3, and Cat 1-2. There was also a scheduled fat-tire race that was cancelled.
    >
    > Well, I'm no dummy, and I've never even done a club ride before, despite a lot of commuting.
    > Recreational it is!
    >
    > Turned out the recreational race was the site of some sort of wacky intramural competition between
    > two fraternities. Most of the riders were on mountain bikes, some wearing hockey helmets (!), and
    > one on a fs!
    >
    > Besides me on my fendered Pinarello, there was one guy with a semi-serious looking older road
    > bike, and one guy with a pretty decent late-model road bike. STI, the real deal. Hm. Maybe some
    > competition.
    >
    > So we raced. pack starts out, the three of us lose everyone on an MTB within about 50 metres. The
    > guy on the semi serious road bike hangs with us for two laps. Then he disappears.
    >
    > So now its two of us. Me on my mutant old Pinarello, with a Sora STI 8v setup and a 105 DT lever
    > for the front, pretty chrome fork, and me. The other guy is riding a nice late-model Trek, STI and
    > everything, but the Camelbak betrays an off-road bent.
    >
    > timed 45-minute race. We hang together now, moving fast. I try a break on him once, get away for
    > about a lap. Hm. He can make time on me on the climb, but I lose him on the flat/downhill part of
    > the course. Start/finish is halfway up the climb. 1.5 km
    >
    > we keep going for a while like this. At one point I look over, and warn him that his front
    > skewer is open! Yikes. I tell him I'll wait, motivated both by sportsmanship and a
    > disinclination to watch him die when his wheel falls off (weird...I'd actually warned another
    > dude he had his wheel loose at the start line, and helped him fix it). He declined my offer, but
    > pulled up to fix the wheel. I carried on, but slacked off, basically taking a rolling rest. He
    > caught up again within a lap.
    >
    > With about 14 minutes to go, I tried a bit of a break, and made it for a while. But with about
    > three laps to go, he's caught up to me at the top of the climb. Gotta work on that "being fat"
    > thing. Bad. I definitely don't want this guy with me at the bottom of the hill...
    >
    > We come around again. He's right with me the whole lap, and I let him lead me up the climb. He
    > tries a half-hearted break, but as long as I'm on his wheel, he's not going anywhere. They ring
    > the bell at the start-finish. I remain calm, and we get to the top of the climb, which ends with a
    > sharp corner.
    >
    > What's that racing strategy Bicycling advocates? Attack at the top of the hill, when everyone
    > wants to rest?
    >
    > I attacked. Jumped out of the saddle, spun like a loon, banged into the big ring, snapped off
    > upshifts like a pro, sprinted until spots danced before my eyes and my HRM to 188 before I stopped
    > paying attention. I pedalled the descent, pedalled the flat, and as I rounded the corner to the
    > climb, I looked back and couldn't see my nemesis anymore.
    >
    > Not sure how much time I had, I kept steady on the pedals, and when I saw the finish line,
    > sprinted it. In the end, I actually won by something like 20 or 30 seconds. The second-place guy
    > admitted that when I started my sprint at the top of the hill, he had nothing.
    >
    > For my trouble, I got an embarrassingly proud t-shirt proclaiming me the UBC Stadium Cycle
    > Criterium CHAMPION!
    >
    > I dedicate this win to Fabrizio Mazzoleni.
    >
    > Then I stayed around for the Competitive race to see how real riders do
    > it. I'm gonna do the weekly crits this year. Probably no wins in my immediate future, but it's
    > going to be a lot of fun trying.
    >
    > --
    > Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  6. Danny Callen

    Danny Callen Guest

    "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If you're bored by long descriptions of Cat 6 race antics, you might want to move on...
    >
    > One race, one win. Too bad it was against a bunch of frat boys.
    >
    > Actually, it was a neat experience:
    >
    > The local university does an annual criterium, and I decided to drop by and try it out. they had
    > three categories: recreational, competitive, and elite. This was supposed to be uncategorized
    > riders, Cat 5-3, and Cat 1-2. There was also a scheduled fat-tire race that was cancelled.
    >
    > Well, I'm no dummy, and I've never even done a club ride before, despite a lot of commuting.
    > Recreational it is!
    >
    > Turned out the recreational race was the site of some sort of wacky intramural competition between
    > two fraternities. Most of the riders were on mountain bikes, some wearing hockey helmets (!), and
    > one on a fs!
    >
    > Besides me on my fendered Pinarello, there was one guy with a semi-serious looking older road
    > bike, and one guy with a pretty decent late-model road bike. STI, the real deal. Hm. Maybe some
    > competition.
    >
    > So we raced. pack starts out, the three of us lose everyone on an MTB within about 50 metres. The
    > guy on the semi serious road bike hangs with us for two laps. Then he disappears.
    >
    > So now its two of us. Me on my mutant old Pinarello, with a Sora STI 8v setup and a 105 DT lever
    > for the front, pretty chrome fork, and me. The other guy is riding a nice late-model Trek, STI and
    > everything, but the Camelbak betrays an off-road bent.
    >
    > timed 45-minute race. We hang together now, moving fast. I try a break on him once, get away for
    > about a lap. Hm. He can make time on me on the climb, but I lose him on the flat/downhill part of
    > the course. Start/finish is halfway up the climb. 1.5 km
    >
    > we keep going for a while like this. At one point I look over, and warn him that his front
    > skewer is open! Yikes. I tell him I'll wait, motivated both by sportsmanship and a
    > disinclination to watch him die when his wheel falls off (weird...I'd actually warned another
    > dude he had his wheel loose at the start line, and helped him fix it). He declined my offer, but
    > pulled up to fix the wheel. I carried on, but slacked off, basically taking a rolling rest. He
    > caught up again within a lap.
    >
    > With about 14 minutes to go, I tried a bit of a break, and made it for a while. But with about
    > three laps to go, he's caught up to me at the top of the climb. Gotta work on that "being fat"
    > thing. Bad. I definitely don't want this guy with me at the bottom of the hill...
    >
    > We come around again. He's right with me the whole lap, and I let him lead me up the climb. He
    > tries a half-hearted break, but as long as I'm on his wheel, he's not going anywhere. They ring
    > the bell at the start-finish. I remain calm, and we get to the top of the climb, which ends with a
    > sharp corner.
    >
    > What's that racing strategy Bicycling advocates? Attack at the top of the hill, when everyone
    > wants to rest?
    >
    > I attacked. Jumped out of the saddle, spun like a loon, banged into the big ring, snapped off
    > upshifts like a pro, sprinted until spots danced before my eyes and my HRM to 188 before I stopped
    > paying attention. I pedalled the descent, pedalled the flat, and as I rounded the corner to the
    > climb, I looked back and couldn't see my nemesis anymore.
    >
    > Not sure how much time I had, I kept steady on the pedals, and when I saw the finish line,
    > sprinted it. In the end, I actually won by something like 20 or 30 seconds. The second-place guy
    > admitted that when I started my sprint at the top of the hill, he had nothing.
    >
    > For my trouble, I got an embarrassingly proud t-shirt proclaiming me the UBC Stadium Cycle
    > Criterium CHAMPION!
    >
    > I dedicate this win to Fabrizio Mazzoleni.
    >
    > Then I stayed around for the Competitive race to see how real riders do
    > it. I'm gonna do the weekly crits this year. Probably no wins in my immediate future, but it's
    > going to be a lot of fun trying.
    >
    > --
    > Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club

    Holy crap a post about RACING in RBR! How long it's been......!!!!!!!!!!!

    good job!

    Danny Callen
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, easyrider <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The greatest journey begins with a single step. Congratulations.
    >
    > By the way, I can't believe anyone would be allowed to race any kind of race in a damned
    > hockey helmet.

    If it makes you feel better, the commissionaire looked suitably horrified, and did warn everyone at
    the start line: "don't crash out there, okay?"

    Seriously though, there was so little racing out there except for the top two or three that there
    was little chance of injury.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - palmares
  1. gntlmn
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    903
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...