Fork change or leave it?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Curb, Jan 27, 2014.

  1. Curb

    Curb New Member

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    Your opinion, [ATTACHMENT=505]image.jpg (3,865k. jpg file)[/ATTACHMENT]Would you buy another fork or leave this stem rise as is? It's comfortable in the current position. I was trying to find a 1" fork but they are scarce and expensive.
     
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  2. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Would you be buying another fork to have more steerer available for more spacers under the stem?

    if so, I would definitely not use a fork with a carbon steerer. There are safe limits with the amount of CF steerer you should have under the stem due to the torque stresses that could be inflicted upon the steerer via the stem/handlebars. For a 1" CF steerer the "safe" amount is even less than a 1-1/8", which would usually be a max of 30mm of spacers under the stem depending on the manufacturer. There's more safe leeway with alloy steerers.

    Based on the amount of seatpost and the rise of the stem the frame seems a little small. It is a nice bike though. if it's comfy I would leave as is.
     
  3. Curb

    Curb New Member

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    Thanks Dan, you answer all my questions and you easily picked up that the bike is small. I'm 5 /10 and doing what I did in the picture is what it took for me to make it comfortable and without adding a ton of extra weight. I was going to use one of those stem risers but that would kinda of donkey also even if I did get a carbon fork with an alumin steerer, I would have to add bunch of spacers to get my bars up to the level I have now with that ritchey stem. Thanks for the complement on the bike but it not pretty any more, I peeled off the stickers and will repaint it. Don't know why because it's my rain bike, and my regular bike is over 10k. Go figure!, Thanks again for your opinion
     
  4. adenough

    adenough New Member

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    Is that a steel fork?
     
  5. Curb

    Curb New Member

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    Just the Steerer
     
  6. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    If you're comfortable, I'd leave everything as it is. If you're not, consider a larger bike.

    The problem with extenders and stacks o' spacers is that bike frames flex and all that extension above the top headset race increases the length of the force arm on the front of the frame. While I doubt you can create enough leverage to break the frame or a carbon fork with an alloy steerer, the net effect of all that torque can't be all that good for the bike's handling. At least with your riser stem and reasonable spacer stack, the torque is distributed between the stem and the span of steerer above the top race.

    By the way, the fork construction of this generation of OCLV frames is an alloy steerer and crown with carbon blades. I believe the steerer OD is 1-1/8".
     
  7. adenough

    adenough New Member

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    Is there that much sideways force created on the front end of a bike? I think the most torque it will come up against is when one is up out of the saddle whilst climbing and pulling on the bars.
    But there again aren't most fork failures at the crown or is that a quality issue?
    Nice steel fork is one way to go. If you don't care about the weight.[​IMG]
     
  8. Curb

    Curb New Member

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    You guys are right. I think I am wasting money and time on trying to update something that's too old an is just a rain bike. I even looked at getting it painted and would cost me about $6-700 dollars. So add on a new fork $200. It's not good economics. I suppose if I am going to spend money I should spend it on my good bike the BMC. THANKS GUYS FOR ALL THE GOOD ADVICE [ATTACHMENT=509]image.jpg (1,359k. jpg file)[/ATTACHMENT]
     
  9. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking the same about my Cinelli. I really like the bike, just wanted to look at something new. The paint job I wanted would have run about $700, and for +$300 I ended up with a relatively new SuperSix frame. Now going to turn that Cinelli into a beater... a very expensive beater;)

    Lovely BMC btw... and w/Campy! There was a stars n' stripes flavored RaceMachine on eBay for about the same price as the S6 in a 54 but the top tubes on their bikes seem longer than typical, I needed just the opposite.
     
  10. Curb

    Curb New Member

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    Well the BMC you see in this picture has my wenter tires on it. I have a pair of 404 tubulars and 303 Tubulars that I use during the summer. With the 303 zips it's a 14 pound bike. But like you, I just want to look at something new. I mean, gosh, I can get a new 2001-12 Ridley for for under 1k and have all the other stuff I need at home to build a complete bike.
     
  11. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    The 303 tubulars are in strong contention for my next set of hoops, along with HEDs Stingers and the 3T Mercurio's.
     
  12. adenough

    adenough New Member

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    Expensive paint jobs in the states.
    A pro bike sprayer here charges about £95 for one colour.
    You can get a powdercoat for less than £60.
     
  13. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    I had something custom in mind with a clear coat over decals. $300 could get a decent one color spray in my parts but 95 quid is a great price.

    Was also calculating for stuff like frame prep afterward though - I'm running Campy Ultra-torque which prefers a freshly faced BB shell (skipping that step results in about 99% of the 'clicking' problems people report on the forums imo).
     
  14. adenough

    adenough New Member

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  15. Curb

    Curb New Member

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    Fyi, I running campy ultra also. I have 2 set of new TI cassettes 12-25 that I might be posting on Ebay.
     
  16. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Bob Jackson had a reputation among racers in America even in the 80's for anyone who wanted a quality 753 frame built. I'm sure the paint coming out of the shop is top shelf.
     
  17. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Mostly, it's just unpleasant and something else to deal with when you're pulling hard. With an alloy steerer I wouldn't worry about breakage.

    Carbon steerers have broken at the stem. Trek had an infamous run of broken steerers on 2010 Madone 6s, and issued a service bulletin aimed at rectifying this. It specified minimum spacers above the stem (at least 5 mm), minimum and maximum spacers between the stem and compression cone (5-40 mm), use of a compatible stem (presumably with at least two binder bolts, as much stack height as a Bontrager Race Lite, having no cutouts where contact is made with the steerer), and following manufacturers' torque specifications.

    While I've reluctantly mounted extenders on alloy steerers without worry, I would never do that to a carbon steerer. And the extender manufacturers' instructions on minimum insertion points and prohibitions against stacking are strictly followed.

    Extenders on alloy steerers look dorky and introduce torque, but are safe if the manufacturer's instructions are followed. Mainly, that means pay attention to the minimum insertion point and no stacking.

    In this case, the riser stem was already doing the job with less expense, more rigidity, and less risk.
     
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