Forks for hardtail...

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Adam, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. Adam

    Adam Guest

    Hi All,

    I'm going to be getting a new hardtail soon after I get back
    from the Southern Hemisphere, and I'm starting to spec it
    up. I'm looking for some pretty solid forks because, as
    evidenced by past posts about trashed wheels, I'm a clumsy
    clydesdale. My first instinct is to stick with Marzocchi and
    this has made me look at the Z1 FR, Dirt Jumpers and even
    the Shiver SC.

    Can anyone comment on these forks or make any other
    suggestions? Obviously, it's nigh on impossible to test ride
    forks on the frame I want to get (no shop I know is going to
    be good enough to trim a steerer tube for a test ride) and
    the hardtails available for test don't seem to have the
    forks that I'm after.

    Lastly (or seperately), can anyone comment on long travel (>
    100mm) forks on hardtails? There are a couple of hardtail
    frames out there that I've looked at that are specifically
    set up for long travel forks. Also, I read Pete Fagerlin's
    comments on the Maverick fork, and it sounds excellent - I'm
    not sure that all that travel wouldn't be too much for a cross-
    country hardtail, though.

    Cheers - Adam...
     
    Tags:


  2. On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 10:46:02 -0800, Adam wrote:

    > I'm going to be getting a new hardtail

    What frame you getting?

    --
    Matt

    Fear of a flat planet
     
  3. Jack

    Jack Guest

    "Adam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I'm going to be getting a new hardtail soon after I get
    > back from the Southern Hemisphere, and I'm starting to
    > spec it up. I'm looking for some pretty solid forks
    > because, as evidenced by past posts about trashed wheels,
    > I'm a clumsy clydesdale. My first instinct is to stick
    > with Marzocchi and this has made me look at the Z1 FR,
    > Dirt Jumpers and even the Shiver SC.
    >
    > Can anyone comment on these forks or make any other
    > suggestions? Obviously, it's nigh on impossible to test
    > ride forks on the frame I want to get (no shop I know is
    > going to be good enough to trim a steerer tube for a test
    > ride) and the hardtails available for test don't seem to
    > have the forks that I'm after.
    >
    > Lastly (or seperately), can anyone comment on long travel
    > (> 100mm) forks on hardtails? There are a couple of
    > hardtail frames out there that I've looked at that are
    > specifically set up for long travel forks. Also, I read
    > Pete Fagerlin's comments on the Maverick fork, and it
    > sounds excellent - I'm not sure that all that travel
    > wouldn't be too much for a cross-country hardtail, though.
    >
    > Cheers - Adam...

    Doing hard time:

    http://www.nsmb.com/trail_tales/hard_time_12_02.php
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Adam) wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > I'm going to be getting a new hardtail soon after I get
    > back from the Southern Hemisphere, and I'm starting to
    > spec it up. I'm looking for some pretty solid forks
    > because, as evidenced by past posts about trashed wheels,
    > I'm a clumsy clydesdale. My first instinct is to stick
    > with Marzocchi and this has made me look at the Z1 FR,
    > Dirt Jumpers and even the Shiver SC.
    >
    > Can anyone comment on these forks or make any other
    > suggestions? Obviously, it's nigh on impossible to test
    > ride forks on the frame I want to get (no shop I know is
    > going to be good enough to trim a steerer tube for a test
    > ride) and the hardtails available for test don't seem to
    > have the forks that I'm after.
    >
    > Lastly (or seperately), can anyone comment on long travel
    > (> 100mm) forks on hardtails? There are a couple of
    > hardtail frames out there that I've looked at that are
    > specifically set up for long travel forks. Also, I read
    > Pete Fagerlin's comments on the Maverick fork, and it
    > sounds excellent - I'm not sure that all that travel
    > wouldn't be too much for a cross-country hardtail, though.

    I think the basic problem, even more than geometry issues
    (which seems to be what you're talking about with your
    "specifically set up..."), is that if you put a 6" travel
    fork on an XC hartdail, you will be in a situation where the
    fork will make the bike heavy and pogo on the frame's
    natural terrain of ascents and fast singletrack/fire road
    terrain, and if you exploit the fork travel by attempting
    big drops, you're likely to break the XC frame.

    There are also intermediate hardtails out there, such as the
    Norco Charger: relatively tough frame with an EXR Pro
    Marzocchi. That's a 5" travel fork, and the idea is that the
    bike is designed for more than just XC courses, but big hits
    are probably a bad idea.

    I ride this kind of stuff all the time: I climb my hardtail
    up to the top of my favourite mountain, put on my leg and
    arm armor, and descend on a trail mostly populated by
    freeriding dudes on big-hit bikes. But since I'm using a
    steel XC hardtail with a '97 vintage Z.2, I dodge the really
    big drops and take the easier lines through the stunts and
    obstacles (I also haven't tried the long, narrow skinny with
    the high price for failure yet).

    Horses for courses, burly bikes for Clydesdales, and light
    stuff for wimpy roadies like me,
    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected]
    http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine/wiredcola/ President, Fabrizio
    Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  5. "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I think the basic problem, even more than geometry issues
    > (which seems to be what you're talking about with your
    > "specifically set up..."), is that if you put a 6" travel
    > fork on an XC hartdail, you will be in a situation where
    > the fork will make the bike heavy

    Expand your horizons...there are 6" forks that weigh
    3.5 pounds.

    It sounds like the OP is a prime candiadate for something
    like a Cove Stiffee FR and a 5-6" fork.
     
  6. Adam

    Adam Guest

    Matthew Paterson <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 10:46:02 -0800, Adam wrote:
    >
    > > I'm going to be getting a new hardtail
    >
    > What frame you getting?

    My prime candidate is the On-one Inbred, but the geometry is
    set up for a 100mm (max) fork and it seems to be hard to
    find a fork that will cope with my weight that is less that
    around 125mm. Also thinking of looking at the Dialled Bikes
    offerings - these are hardtails set up for longer travel (up
    to 150mm) forks.

    Cheers - Adam...
     
  7. Adam

    Adam Guest

    Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    -8<- snip original ->8-
    >
    > I think the basic problem, even more than geometry issues
    > (which seems to be what you're talking about with your
    > "specifically set up..."), is that if you put a 6" travel
    > fork on an XC hartdail, you will be in a situation where
    > the fork will make the bike heavy and pogo on the frame's
    > natural terrain of ascents and fast singletrack/fire road
    > terrain, and if you exploit the fork travel by attempting
    > big drops, you're likely to break the XC frame.

    I was thinking of the Dialled Bikes offerings, "and
    specifically set up" referred both to the geometry
    (corrected for up to 150mm) and the fact that the headtube
    area has been strengthened to cope with the leverage offered
    by putting a long-travel fork on. I'm not too bothered about
    the weight of a long-travel setup, but I am worried about
    changes in steering geometry and, toa certain extent,
    pogoing - although, I guess those are considerations that
    are independant of whether or not the frame is hardtail.

    > There are also intermediate hardtails out there, such as
    > the Norco Charger: relatively tough frame with an EXR Pro
    > Marzocchi. That's a 5" travel fork, and the idea is that
    > the bike is designed for more than just XC courses, but
    > big hits are probably a bad idea.
    >
    > I ride this kind of stuff all the time: I climb my
    > hardtail up to the top of my favourite mountain, put on my
    > leg and arm armor, and descend on a trail mostly populated
    > by freeriding dudes on big-hit bikes. But since I'm using
    > a steel XC hardtail with a '97 vintage Z.2, I dodge the
    > really big drops and take the easier lines through the
    > stunts and obstacles (I also haven't tried the long,
    > narrow skinny with the high price for failure yet).
    >
    > Horses for courses, burly bikes for Clydesdales, and light
    > stuff for wimpy roadies like me,

    Exactly, and that's why I'm looking at forks like the Z1.
    I'm definitely a pie-eater, me.
     
  8. Adam

    Adam Guest

    "p e t e f a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:rcousine-
    > [email protected]
    > > I think the basic problem, even more than geometry
    > > issues (which seems to be what you're talking about with
    > > your "specifically set up..."), is that if you put a 6"
    > > travel fork on an XC hartdail, you will be in a
    > > situation where the fork will make the bike heavy
    >
    > Expand your horizons...there are 6" forks that weigh
    > 3.5 pounds.
    >
    > It sounds like the OP is a prime candiadate for something
    > like a Cove Stiffee FR and a 5-6" fork.

    Hi Pete,

    It was your post about the Maverick that made me think along
    the lines of getting a long-travel fork and a suitable
    frame, rather than trying to find a shorter travel fork to
    suit me and the frame I was thinking of. In particular, my
    latest fork is a Marzocchi MX Pro Coil - stunningly smooth
    and capable bump-eating, but very flexy - and I was hoping
    to find something much stiffer.

    Will the Maverick stand up to a Clydesdale? I mostly ride
    cross-country (I don't 'huck', I don't think - I'm still not
    entirely sure what 'hucking' is), but I am heavy and
    occasionally inelegant to the point of clumsy. Rock gardens,
    steep chutes and switch-back laden singletrack (plus the
    occasional berm) is more my thing than dropping off garages.

    Cheers - Adam...
     
  9. Pete Jones

    Pete Jones Guest

    On 8 Mar 2004 01:04:04 -0800, [email protected] (Adam)
    blathered:

    >Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<rcousine-
    >[email protected]>...
    >> In article
    >> <[email protected]>,
    >-8<- snip original ->8-
    >>
    >> I think the basic problem, even more than geometry issues
    >> (which seems to be what you're talking about with your
    >> "specifically set up..."), is that if you put a 6" travel
    >> fork on an XC hartdail, you will be in a situation where
    >> the fork will make the bike heavy and pogo on the frame's
    >> natural terrain of ascents and fast singletrack/fire road
    >> terrain, and if you exploit the fork travel by attempting
    >> big drops, you're likely to break the XC frame.
    >
    >I was thinking of the Dialled Bikes offerings, "and
    >specifically set up" referred both to the geometry
    >(corrected for up to 150mm) and the fact that the headtube
    >area has been strengthened to cope with the leverage
    >offered by putting a long-travel fork on. I'm not too
    >bothered about the weight of a long-travel setup, but I am
    >worried about changes in steering geometry and, toa certain
    >extent, pogoing

    Personally i prefer the look of the Cotic Soul -

    http://www.cotic.co.uk/
    http://www.singletrackworld.com/article.php?sid=814 http://-
    www.bikemagic.com/review/reviewproduct/mps/RPN/15575/v/1/sp-
    /328671336660364775254

    ...and whatever 5" frame you fancy (I like the Maguras I've
    been riding since April last year). You can't really
    consider forks of that length independant of whatever frame
    you intend putting them on. I personally think 6" is too
    much for a hardtail - but then, a few years ago, people
    thought 3" was pushing it, so it's your call.

    Pete
     
  10. "Adam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Matthew Paterson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 10:46:02 -0800, Adam wrote:
    > >
    > > > I'm going to be getting a new hardtail
    > >
    > > What frame you getting?
    >
    > My prime candidate is the On-one Inbred, but the geometry
    > is set up for a 100mm (max) fork

    I have a similar bike to the inbred, http://steve-
    t.fotopic.net/p3186525.html

    it was set up originally with rigid forks but I'm now
    running a Shiver SC (100mm version) which is superb. Its a
    little on the heavy side but worth it for the bomb-proofness
    and security of the 20mm axle. As a nod to weight saving I
    swopped the re-inforced steel steerer for a reinforced
    aluminium one, which brought the weight down by 200g to just
    over 5lbs.

    > and it seems to be hard to find a fork that will cope with
    > my weight that is less that around 125mm. Also thinking of
    > looking at the Dialled Bikes offerings - these are
    > hardtails set up for longer travel (up to 150mm) forks.

    Dialled bikes 'morning glory' is very nice indeed, if I
    needed another bike...

    Steve.
     
  11. Adam

    Adam Guest

    "spademan o---[\) *" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Adam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Matthew Paterson <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 10:46:02 -0800, Adam wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > I'm going to be getting a new hardtail
    > > >
    > > > What frame you getting?
    > >
    > > My prime candidate is the On-one Inbred, but the
    > > geometry is set up for a 100mm (max) fork
    >
    > I have a similar bike to the inbred, http://steve-
    > t.fotopic.net/p3186525.html
    >
    > it was set up originally with rigid forks but I'm now
    > running a Shiver SC (100mm version) which is superb. Its a
    > little on the heavy side but worth it for the bomb-
    > proofness and security of the 20mm axle. As a nod to
    > weight saving I swopped the re-inforced steel steerer for
    > a reinforced aluminium one, which brought the weight down
    > by 200g to just over 5lbs.

    That's interesting, because that's one of the combinations
    I'd thought of. It is heavy, but I'd figured the strength
    would make it worth while. What does the Shiver ride like?
    How stiff (torsionally) is it?

    Was the steerer swap much of a pain?

    > > and it seems to be hard to find a fork that will cope
    > > with my weight that is less that around 125mm. Also
    > > thinking of looking at the Dialled Bikes offerings -
    > > these are hardtails set up for longer travel (up to
    > > 150mm) forks.
    >
    > Dialled bikes 'morning glory' is very nice indeed, if I
    > needed another bike...

    As an alternative to the setup above, I was thinking of the
    Morning Glory mated to a Z1 FR. It's about the same weight
    of fork, and it should be about as strong.

    Pete Fagerlin's review has got me interested in the
    Maverick, now, though...

    Cheers - Adam...
     
  12. Adam

    Adam Guest

    Pete Jones <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 8 Mar 2004 01:04:04 -0800, [email protected]
    > (Adam) blathered:
    >
    > >Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<rcousine-
    > >[email protected]>...
    > >> In article
    > >> <[email protected]>,
    > -8<- snip original ->8-
    > >>
    > >> I think the basic problem, even more than geometry
    > >> issues (which seems to be what you're talking about
    > >> with your "specifically set up..."), is that if you put
    > >> a 6" travel fork on an XC hartdail, you will be in a
    > >> situation where the fork will make the bike heavy and
    > >> pogo on the frame's natural terrain of ascents and fast
    > >> singletrack/fire road terrain, and if you exploit the
    > >> fork travel by attempting big drops, you're likely to
    > >> break the XC frame.
    > >
    > >I was thinking of the Dialled Bikes offerings, "and
    > >specifically set up" referred both to the geometry
    > >(corrected for up to 150mm) and the fact that the
    > >headtube area has been strengthened to cope with the
    > >leverage offered by putting a long-travel fork on. I'm
    > >not too bothered about the weight of a long-travel setup,
    > >but I am worried about changes in steering geometry and,
    > >toa certain extent, pogoing
    >
    > Personally i prefer the look of the Cotic Soul -
    >
    > http://www.cotic.co.uk/
    > http://www.singletrackworld.com/article.php?sid=814 http:-
    > //www.bikemagic.com/review/reviewproduct/mps/RPN/15575/v/-
    > 1/sp/328671336660364775254

    Damn. That's another one to consider. I'm probably going to
    get a Ti frame, but I'm looking at steel too (including
    possibly a Chas Roberts semi-custom).

    > ...and whatever 5" frame you fancy (I like the Maguras
    > I've been riding since April last year). You can't really
    > consider forks of that length independant of whatever
    > frame you intend putting them on.

    Agreed. As I said to Steve above, I'm considering two main
    contenders at the moment: On-One Inbred (geared Ti) with
    Shiver SC or Dialled Bikes Morning Glory with Z1 FR. I
    > personally think 6" is too much for a hardtail - but then,
    > a few years ago, people thought 3" was pushing it, so it's
    > your call.

    That's one of things I was hoping for more comments on. Why
    is 6" too much for a hardtail?

    As it happens, I agree because I fear that the geometry
    changes would be too much under compression and that the
    bike would pogo on steps (such as the Ewok Village at
    Glentress) and the like. These are issues specific to long
    travel forks, though, rather than hardtails. I'd like to add
    that I've never ridden any fork longer than my current MX
    Pro (105mm), so this view isn't based on any kind of
    experience...

    Cheers - Adam.
     
  13. "Adam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "spademan o---[\) *" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Adam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Matthew Paterson <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > message
    > > news:<[email protected]
    > > k>...
    > > > > On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 10:46:02 -0800, Adam wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > I'm going to be getting a new hardtail
    > > > >
    > > > > What frame you getting?
    > > >
    > > > My prime candidate is the On-one Inbred, but the
    > > > geometry is set up for a 100mm (max) fork
    > >
    > > I have a similar bike to the inbred, http://steve-
    > > t.fotopic.net/p3186525.html
    > >
    > > it was set up originally with rigid forks but I'm now
    > > running a Shiver
    SC
    > > (100mm version) which is superb. Its a little on the
    > > heavy side but
    worth it
    > > for the bomb-proofness and security of the 20mm axle. As
    > > a nod to weight saving I swopped the re-inforced steel
    > > steerer for a reinforced
    aluminium
    > > one, which brought the weight down by 200g to just
    > > over 5lbs.
    >
    > That's interesting, because that's one of the combinations
    > I'd thought of. It is heavy, but I'd figured the strength
    > would make it worth while. What does the Shiver ride like?
    > How stiff (torsionally) is it?

    Only had two shortish (< 2 hour) rides so far, but I've been
    impressed. Immense mud clearance etc due to the inverted
    design and Marzocchi suspension action - you know its good.
    Stock springs are quite soft, if you're heavy you may need
    to swap them. Torsionally I've not not noticed any problem,
    this years 100mm version is supposedly better than last
    years longer 120mm version.

    > Was the steerer swap much of a pain?

    I sent it off to windwave, took about a week, cost
    about 50 quid.

    > > Dialled bikes 'morning glory' is very nice indeed, if I
    > > needed another bike...
    >
    > As an alternative to the setup above, I was thinking of
    > the Morning Glory mated to a Z1 FR. It's about the same
    > weight of fork, and it should be about as strong.

    I'd go for the morning glory/Z1 option.

    > Pete Fagerlin's review has got me interested in the
    > Maverick, now, though...

    Well its your money...

    Steve.
     
  14. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    "Adam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > It was your post about the Maverick that made me think
    > along the lines of getting a long-travel fork and a
    > suitable frame, rather than trying to find a shorter
    > travel fork to suit me and the frame I was thinking of. In
    > particular, my latest fork is a Marzocchi MX Pro Coil -
    > stunningly smooth and capable bump-eating, but very flexy
    > - and I was hoping to find something much stiffer.
    >
    > Will the Maverick stand up to a Clydesdale? I mostly ride
    > cross-country (I don't 'huck', I don't think - I'm still
    > not entirely sure what 'hucking' is), but I am heavy and
    > occasionally inelegant to the point of clumsy. Rock
    > gardens, steep chutes and switch-back laden singletrack
    > (plus the occasional berm) is more my thing than dropping
    > off garages.
    >

    Can someone explain to me how 5" of front travel helps on a
    no rear travel hardtail?

    Greg
     
  15. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    "Adam" <[email protected].com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Pete Jones <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On 8 Mar 2004 01:04:04 -0800, [email protected]
    > > (Adam) blathered:
    > >
    > > >Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > >> In article
    > > >> <[email protected]>,
    > > -8<- snip original ->8-
    > > >>
    > > >> I think the basic problem, even more than geometry
    > > >> issues (which
    seems
    > > >> to be what you're talking about with your
    > > >> "specifically set up..."),
    is
    > > >> that if you put a 6" travel fork on an XC hartdail,
    > > >> you will be in a situation where the fork will make
    > > >> the bike heavy and pogo on the frame's natural
    > > >> terrain of ascents and fast singletrack/fire road
    > > >> terrain, and if you exploit the fork travel by
    > > >> attempting big drops, you're likely to break the XC
    > > >> frame.
    > > >
    > > >I was thinking of the Dialled Bikes offerings, "and
    > > >specifically set up" referred both to the geometry
    > > >(corrected for up to 150mm) and the fact that the
    > > >headtube area has been strengthened to cope with the
    > > >leverage offered by putting a long-travel fork on. I'm
    > > >not too bothered about the weight of a long-travel
    > > >setup, but I am worried about changes in steering
    > > >geometry and, toa certain extent, pogoing
    > >
    > > Personally i prefer the look of the Cotic Soul -
    > >
    > > http://www.cotic.co.uk/
    > > http://www.singletrackworld.com/article.php?sid=814
    > >
    http://www.bikemagic.com/review/reviewproduct/mps/RPN/15575-
    /v/1/sp/328671336 660364775254
    >
    > Damn. That's another one to consider. I'm probably going
    > to get a Ti frame, but I'm looking at steel too (including
    > possibly a Chas Roberts semi-custom).
    >
    > > ...and whatever 5" frame you fancy (I like the Maguras
    > > I've been riding since April last year). You can't
    > > really consider forks of that length independant of
    > > whatever frame you intend putting them on.
    >
    > Agreed. As I said to Steve above, I'm considering two main
    > contenders at the moment: On-One Inbred (geared Ti) with
    > Shiver SC or Dialled Bikes Morning Glory with Z1 FR. I
    > > personally think 6" is too much for a hardtail - but
    > > then, a few years ago, people thought 3" was pushing it,
    > > so it's your call.
    >
    > That's one of things I was hoping for more comments on.
    > Why is 6" too much for a hardtail?
    >

    Because the rear only has the travel of your rear tire to
    try to match the front.

    Greg
     
  16. basilkies

    basilkies Guest

    I built my last bike around my choice of fork, which was a
    Marzocchi 150 FR ETA. This moved me to a freeride style
    frame because the forks are so much higher. I know your
    aiming for a hardtail and I recall articles some years ago
    saying there is definitely a benefit to lots of travel on
    hard tails.

    What I don't understand is why the dirt jumper? It's like
    you want a the lightest frame but the heaviest fork? Maybe,
    it's a mud issue? Anyway my full suspension pogo's like
    crazy, but luckily it has lock outs. The Marzocchi Freeride
    style forks have ETA's on them that in essence shorten the
    fork an inch to an inch and a half and stiffen them so
    pogoing is solved. The knob is actually reasonably easy to
    use while riding (and I don't mean on the fly racing from a
    short steep downhill to a fast transition uphill).

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 17:22:24 -0800, Ryan Cousineau
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article
    ><[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] (Adam) wrote:
    >
    >> Hi All,
    >>
    >> I'm going to be getting a new hardtail soon after I get
    >> back from the Southern Hemisphere, and I'm starting to
    >> spec it up. I'm looking for some pretty solid forks
    >> because, as evidenced by past posts about trashed wheels,
    >> I'm a clumsy clydesdale. My first instinct is to stick
    >> with Marzocchi and this has made me look at the Z1 FR,
    >> Dirt Jumpers and even the Shiver SC.
    >>
    >> Can anyone comment on these forks or make any other
    >> suggestions? Obviously, it's nigh on impossible to test
    >> ride forks on the frame I want to get (no shop I know is
    >> going to be good enough to trim a steerer tube for a test
    >> ride) and the hardtails available for test don't seem to
    >> have the forks that I'm after.
    >>
    >> Lastly (or seperately), can anyone comment on long travel
    >> (> 100mm) forks on hardtails? There are a couple of
    >> hardtail frames out there that I've looked at that are
    >> specifically set up for long travel forks. Also, I read
    >> Pete Fagerlin's comments on the Maverick fork, and it
    >> sounds excellent - I'm not sure that all that travel
    >> wouldn't be too much for a cross-country hardtail,
    >> though.
    >
    >I think the basic problem, even more than geometry issues
    >(which seems to be what you're talking about with your
    >"specifically set up..."), is that if you put a 6" travel
    >fork on an XC hartdail, you will be in a situation where
    >the fork will make the bike heavy and pogo on the frame's
    >natural terrain of ascents and fast singletrack/fire road
    >terrain, and if you exploit the fork travel by attempting
    >big drops, you're likely to break the XC frame.
    >
    >There are also intermediate hardtails out there, such as
    >the Norco Charger: relatively tough frame with an EXR Pro
    >Marzocchi. That's a 5" travel fork, and the idea is that
    >the bike is designed for more than just XC courses, but big
    >hits are probably a bad idea.
    >
    >I ride this kind of stuff all the time: I climb my hardtail
    >up to the top of my favourite mountain, put on my leg and
    >arm armor, and descend on a trail mostly populated by
    >freeriding dudes on big-hit bikes. But since I'm using a
    >steel XC hardtail with a '97 vintage Z.2, I dodge the
    >really big drops and take the easier lines through the
    >stunts and obstacles (I also haven't tried the long, narrow
    >skinny with the high price for failure yet).
    >
    >Horses for courses, burly bikes for Clydesdales, and light
    >stuff for wimpy roadies like me,
     
  17. Gazzer

    Gazzer Guest

    "G.T." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<bD13c.7371
    > Because the rear only has the travel of your rear tire to
    > try to match the front.
    >
    > Greg

    When the rear wheel hits a bump, assuming your body is
    fairly central, the bike will pivot around the BB and
    compress the fork. Therefore adding front suspension also
    aids the rear.

    Does that sound plausible?

    g
     
  18. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    gazzer wrote:
    > "G.T." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<bD13c.7371
    >
    >>Because the rear only has the travel of your rear tire to
    >>try to match the front.
    >>
    >>Greg
    >
    >
    > When the rear wheel hits a bump, assuming your body is
    > fairly central, the bike will pivot around the BB and
    > compress the fork. Therefore adding front suspension also
    > aids the rear.
    >
    > Does that sound plausible?
    >

    Well, while the bike is pivoting around the BB and
    compressing the fork your seat is still getting pounded
    up your ass.

    Greg
     
  19. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    gazzer wrote:
    > "G.T." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<bD13c.7371
    >> Because the rear only has the travel of your rear tire to
    >> try to match the front.
    >>
    >> Greg
    >
    > When the rear wheel hits a bump, assuming your body is
    > fairly central, the bike will pivot around the BB and
    > compress the fork. Therefore adding front suspension also
    > aids the rear.
    >
    > Does that sound plausible?

    Sure -- tell that to the LifeFlight medic when they get your
    stretcher in the chopper :)

    Bill "prescription for endo-itis" S.
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    "p e t e f a g e r l i n" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:rcousine-
    > [email protected]
    > > I think the basic problem, even more than geometry
    > > issues (which seems to be what you're talking about with
    > > your "specifically set up..."), is that if you put a 6"
    > > travel fork on an XC hartdail, you will be in a
    > > situation where the fork will make the bike heavy
    >
    > Expand your horizons...there are 6" forks that weigh
    > 3.5 pounds.

    Touché. But my other points do stand: a 6" fork is likely to
    be a bad match for an XC frame, as the intended use of a 6"
    fork will not match that of an XC frame. I don't know the
    fork you are thinking of (it's your Maverick, right?), but I
    suspect it's no match for an XC or stable-platform fork
    going up, and the bike will break if you ride down 6"-worthy
    obstacles.

    > It sounds like the OP is a prime candiadate for something
    > like a Cove Stiffee FR and a 5-6" fork.

    That would be a good combo. The Stiffee is not an XC
    frame, though.

    I should say that such a beast won't necessarily be that
    much heavier than a pure XC hardtail. It would certainly be
    lighter than pedal much better than any full-suspension
    freeride bike, excepting maybe some of the new stable-
    platform stuff.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected]
    http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine/wiredcola/ President, Fabrizio
    Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
Loading...
Loading...