former bike shop

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Claire Petersky, May 31, 2004.

  1. Yesterday, I went to my former bike shop. I bought my first
    roadie shoes there, my first bicycle computer, and my first
    SPD pedals, and they did lots of work on my bike for a
    while. But the one decent guy who worked there left, and I
    didn't see much reason to remain as their customer.

    My reasons for not being their customer any more was
    underscored when I went in to the bike shop. The only
    reason why I was in there was I had business at another
    store in the strip mall, and I thought I'd stop by. So I
    did -- why not?

    Three employees were sitting around (literally -- in folding
    chairs, in the center of the store) talking to each other. I
    came in, and headed to their more expensive road bikes. I
    fingered the merchandise, and talked to my daughter about
    what I'd be interested in, in a new bike. I went over to the
    clothing, and rummaged through the 30% off on all 2003 bike
    clothes rack. I peered into the case at the counter.

    Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    interested in, try to sell me a bike, clothes, or
    accessories. For that matter, considering that probably two
    of them were wrenches, were any of them working on bikes.

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato
    and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm See the
    books I've set free at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
    Tags:


  2. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Claire Petersky wrote:

    >Yesterday, I went to my former bike shop. I bought my first
    >roadie shoes there, my first bicycle computer, and my first
    >SPD pedals, and they did lots of work on my bike for a
    >while. But the one decent guy who worked there left, and I
    >didn't see much reason to remain as their customer.
    >
    >My reasons for not being their customer any more was
    >underscored when I went in to the bike shop. The only
    >reason why I was in there was I had business at another
    >store in the strip mall, and I thought I'd stop by. So I
    >did -- why not?
    >
    >Three employees were sitting around (literally -- in
    >folding chairs, in the center of the store) talking to each
    >other. I came in, and headed to their more expensive road
    >bikes. I fingered the merchandise, and talked to my
    >daughter about what I'd be interested in, in a new bike. I
    >went over to the clothing, and rummaged through the 30% off
    >on all 2003 bike clothes rack. I peered into the case at
    >the counter.
    >
    >Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    >interested in, try to sell me a bike, clothes, or
    >accessories. For that matter, considering that probably two
    >of them were wrenches, were any of them working on bikes.
    >
    Your accoutn tells a tale... Bernie
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 01 Jun 2004 03:12:54 GMT, "Claire Petersky"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    >interested in, try to sell me a bike, clothes, or
    >accessories. For that matter, considering that probably two
    >of them were wrenches, were any of them working on bikes.

    They, umm, didn't want to...bother you. Yeah, that's
    the ticket!
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 01 Jun 2004 03:12:54 GMT, <[email protected]_s53>,
    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >But the one decent guy who worked there left, and I didn't
    >see much reason to remain as their customer.

    Find out where he's working now. Hairdressers, mechanics,
    plumbers, chefs etc. often keep _their_ clients after
    changing employers.
    --
    zk
     
  5. In <[email protected]_s53>, Claire Petersky wrote:

    > Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    > interested in, try to sell me a bike, clothes, or
    > accessories.

    Strangely enough, this is what I prefer. I don't actually
    want someone to try to sell me anything that I haven't come
    in to buy. I usually just want to conduct my business in the
    most efficient way possible, and to be left alone if I
    haven't asked for anything.

    For me, the test comes when I actually need help: if I ask
    for help and it seems like I am bothering the sales staff or
    if they are going to treat me like a fred or whatnot, then
    that's my signal to not come back.

    > For that matter, considering that probably two of them
    > were wrenches, were any of them working on bikes.

    I guess the place isn't a sweatshop, but if you've had bad
    experiences with long service times before then I can see
    your point.

    --
    Herbie J. Famous Curator
     
  6. According to Claire Petersky <[email protected]>:

    >Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    >interested in, try to sell me a bike, clothes, or
    >accessories. For that matter, considering that probably two
    >of them were wrenches, were any of them working on bikes.

    You'd rather they were breathing down your neck sparring
    with one another for the measly 1% commission that some
    shops pay? That sounds miserable.

    I'm sure if you asked for help they would have been happy to
    talk bikes with you.

    ----
    Lars Lehtonen
     
  7. On 1 Jun 2004 08:12:15 GMT, Lars Lehtonen <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >You'd rather they were breathing down your neck sparring
    >with one another for the measly 1% commission that some
    >shops pay? That sounds miserable.
    >
    >I'm sure if you asked for help they would have been happy
    >to talk bikes with you.

    There is certainly room in between, as in one coming over
    and asking if they needed any help in locating what they are
    looking for. Whatever the commission may be is irrelevant -
    if they are unhappy with what they are paid, they can try a
    place that expects them to work.

    Curtis L. Russell Odenton, MD (USA) Just someone on
    two wheels...
     
  8. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 1 Jun 2004 08:12:15 GMT, Lars Lehtonen <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >You'd rather they were breathing down your neck sparring
    >with one another for the measly 1% commission that some
    >shops pay? That sounds miserable.

    A simple "Is there anything I can help you with?" is a
    good balance.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  9. "Lars Lehtonen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > According to Claire Petersky <[email protected]>:
    >
    > >Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    > >interested in, try to sell me a bike, clothes, or
    > >accessories. For that matter, considering that
    > >probably two of them were wrenches, were any of them
    > >working on bikes.
    >
    > You'd rather they were breathing down your neck sparring
    > with one another for the measly 1% commission that some
    > shops pay? That sounds miserable.

    Having worked retail, what I would have done was: hauled my
    bulk out of my folding chair, turned to the shopper, and
    said something like: "looking at those Treks? Need any
    help?" If the person replied something like, "no, just
    browsing", then I'd say, "OK, just let me know if you need
    anything", and then settled myself back down on my folding
    chair. This isn't breathing down necks, this is
    acknowledging the presence of another human being.

    I also suspect, but have no evidence for, that strikes
    against me were my age, and me looking at road bikes. Being
    female was also probably against me, too, as I was therefore
    not to be taken seriously -- although probably a

    respect.

    > I'm sure if you asked for help they would have been happy
    > to talk bikes with you.

    Nah, they were too busy talking amongst themselves. I didn't
    want to interrupt them.

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato
    and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm See the
    books I've set free at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  10. Nyrides

    Nyrides Guest

    Claire:

    While I understand and respect the opinions of others who
    have replied, I also understand exactly what you mean. It
    isn't just bike shops, though. If storeowners only knew how
    much business they lose by hiring unknowledgeable sales
    people who are afraid to approach customers, they would
    probably shape up pretty fast.

    I constantly walk out of stores with money burning a hole in
    my pocket. One day recently, I had $3,000 to spend on a
    laptop computer that I absolutely needed the very next day.
    I walked into a well-known national mega computer chain
    store and found three young salespeople gathered around a
    23" monitor playing a video game. I told them I needed to
    buy a laptop in a hurry and that it was my first time buying
    one. Without looking up from the screen, two of them pointed
    me to the aisle with the laptops and one said "The laptops
    are over there." Needless to say, I walked out after two
    minutes of trying to sell myself a laptop.

    Even more recently, I walked into my neighborhood bike shop
    on a Sunday to buy my wife the brand new bicycle I'd been
    promising her forever. We're both really busy and this was
    the only time we could arrange to shop for the bike
    together. Again, the money was in my pocket and there was no
    way we weren't buying a bike that day. Well, it was Sunday,
    and the owner, whom I know very well and really wanted to
    give the business, decided to take the day off and leave two
    high school kids running the store. My wife and I walked in
    and started fumbling our way through the hundreds of bikes
    on display. I even pulled a few from the racks to size her
    up. In all the time we were shopping, the two kids at the
    counter never even looked up from their conversation about
    "hot chicks." When I asked if one could help, his response
    was "What are you looking for?" I told him "A bike for my
    wife." "What kind?" he replied. "Probably a hybrid." I said.
    "What size?" he asked. "I'm not sure...she needs to be sized
    up." He then brought my wife to the closest female hybrid in
    the showroom, asked her to get on, then asked "Does THAT
    feel like the right size?" We bought my wife's bike
    somewhere else.

    This happens to me all the time, and I've made a habit of
    skipping out of stores that do this to me. I guess I'm just
    getting old. I used to like to be left alone when I was
    shopping, but that was when I was young and thought I knew
    more about everything than anybody. Now that I'm older and
    realize I'm not so smart, I need to be "sold" by
    salesperson before I'll buy anything. My final example is
    the $150,000 home renovation for which my wife and I are
    trying to book contractors, designers, and architects. Highly-
    recommended tradespeople of all sorts have been escorted
    out our door for making the same mistake: They ask us "what
    we want" and tell us "they'll do whatever we want." We've
    made it clear to all these people that we need guidance,
    that we've never done this before and we need input from
    experienced professionals. Still, they come to the house
    and get frustrated if we don't know whether we want flush
    beams or soffits in our kitchen. The first kitchen designer
    who said to us "This is what you do and here's why" got a
    big gig out of us.

    I think store owners should take this as a warning. The
    biggest reason people still shop in retail stores,
    rather than buying things cheaper online, is for the
    interaction with knowledgeable salespeople who can guide
    us through the selection and buying process. Once that
    benefit is eliminated, we might as well all buy blindly
    via the Internet.

    ."Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]_s53...
    > Yesterday, I went to my former bike shop. I bought my
    > first roadie shoes there, my first bicycle computer, and
    > my first SPD pedals, and they did
    lots
    > of work on my bike for a while. But the one decent guy who
    > worked there left, and I didn't see much reason to remain
    > as their customer.
    >
    > My reasons for not being their customer any more was
    > underscored when I
    went
    > in to the bike shop. The only reason why I was in there
    > was I had business at another store in the strip mall, and
    > I thought I'd stop by. So I did -- why not?
    >
    > Three employees were sitting around (literally -- in
    > folding chairs, in
    the
    > center of the store) talking to each other. I came in, and
    > headed to their more expensive road bikes. I fingered the
    > merchandise, and talked to my daughter about what I'd be
    > interested in, in a new bike. I went over to
    the
    > clothing, and rummaged through the 30% off on all 2003
    > bike clothes rack.
    I
    > peered into the case at the counter.
    >
    > Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    > interested in, try to sell me a bike, clothes, or
    > accessories. For that matter, considering that
    > probably two of them were wrenches, were any of them
    > working on bikes.
    >
    > --
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    > Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato
    > and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm See the
    > books I've set free at:
    > http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  11. Neil0502

    Neil0502 Guest

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : On 1 Jun 2004 08:12:15 GMT, Lars Lehtonen
    <[email protected]>
    : wrote:
    : >You'd rather they were breathing down your neck sparring
    with one
    : >another for the measly 1% commission that some shops pay?
    That sounds
    : >miserable.
    :
    : A simple "Is there anything I can help you with?" is a
    good balance.
    : --
    : Rick Onanian

    Better (IMHO)--from the retailer's perspective--is any
    question NOT readily answered "yes" or "no."

    "What kind of cycling are you into?"

    "Ah, Cannondales. Good choice. What type of bike do you
    have now?"

    "Looking for a bike for yourself or for somebody else?"

    ...etc., etc. Get the customer talking. They'll tell you
    what they want . . . even if it's just to be left alone ;-)

    Sorry, Claire. Welcome to retail!
     
  12. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Claire Petersky wrote:

    > Having worked retail, what I would have done was: hauled
    > my bulk out of my folding chair, turned to the shopper,
    > and said something like: "looking at those Treks? Need any
    > help?" If the person replied something like, "no, just
    > browsing", then I'd say, "OK, just let me know if you need
    > anything", and then settled myself back down on my folding
    > chair. This isn't breathing down necks, this is
    > acknowledging the presence of another human being.
    >
    > I also suspect, but have no evidence for, that strikes
    > against me were my age, and me looking at road bikes.
    > Being female was also probably against me, too, as I was
    > therefore not to be taken

    > might have gotten some attention, if not respect.
    >
    >> I'm sure if you asked for help they would have been happy
    >> to talk bikes with you.
    >
    > Nah, they were too busy talking amongst themselves. I
    > didn't want to interrupt them.

    As a business owner, I've always felt empathy or comraderie
    with other business owners. In the past I might have let the
    owner/manager know about my experience. But it seems just as
    many of them have bad attitudes too. So these days, I just
    let people dig their own graves, and hope someone better
    steps in to fill the void. Unfortunately, many small
    businesses are immune to normal market forces -- daddy owns
    the building, etc. And if a location is good enough, repeat
    business may not be an issue -- note how many really crappy
    restaurants seem to hang on for decades.

    Matt O.
     
  13. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Zoot Katz <[email protected]> writes:
    > Tue, 01 Jun 2004 03:12:54 GMT,
    > <[email protected]_s53>, "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]
    > potato.com> wrote:
    >
    >>But the one decent guy who worked there left, and I didn't
    >>see much reason to remain as their customer.
    >
    > Find out where he's working now. Hairdressers, mechanics,
    > plumbers, chefs etc. often keep _their_ clients after
    > changing employers.

    Chinese restaurants are like that too, but it's a task to
    keep track of which cooks are working where.

    My usual tactic to get service is to look like a shoplifter.
    Although sometimes I've come close to having to push the
    button on the till that opens the cash drawer and makes the
    bell ring, to get any attention.

    Flashing a big wad of cash sometimes works, too.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  14. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 1 Jun 2004 13:43:14 -0700, [email protected] (Tom Keats)
    wrote:
    >Flashing a big wad of cash sometimes works, too.

    Doesn't work in one Warwick, RI store. On more than one
    occasions, I've stood unattended for ten or twenty minutes
    at the cash register with cash visible in one hand and
    something I want to purchase in the other. I'd say this is
    my experience for at least 40% of my visits there.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  15. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Tue, 1 Jun 2004 13:43:14 -0700, [email protected]
    > (Tom Keats) wrote:
    >>Flashing a big wad of cash sometimes works, too.
    >
    > Doesn't work in one Warwick, RI store. On more than one
    > occasions, I've stood unattended for ten or twenty minutes
    > at the cash register with cash visible in one hand and
    > something I want to purchase in the other. I'd say this is
    > my experience for at least 40% of my visits there.

    That's when i'd be sorely tempted to open the cash
    register, ring-up and pay in full for my purchase, take
    whatever change I have coming, take my receipt, and shove
    the cash drawer closed again. I've never done it, but one
    of these days ...

    It's a fun fantasy, anyways.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  16. > I think store owners should take this as a warning.

    Hear, hear! You're spot-on, but the impression that the
    store owners give, by either their attitude or their
    absence, is that they just don't care about whether they get
    your business.
     
  17. > Even more recently, I walked into my neighborhood bike
    > shop on a Sunday to buy my wife the brand new bicycle I'd
    > been promising her forever. We're both really busy and
    > this was the only time we could arrange to shop for
    the
    > bike together. Again, the money was in my pocket and there
    > was no way we weren't buying a bike that day. Well, it was
    > Sunday, and the owner, whom
    I
    > know very well and really wanted to give the business,
    > decided to take the day off and leave two high school kids
    > running the store. My wife and I walked in and started
    > fumbling our way through the hundreds of bikes on display.
    > I even pulled a few from the racks to size her up. In all
    > the time we were shopping, the two kids at the counter
    > never even looked up
    from
    > their conversation about "hot chicks." When I asked if one
    > could help,
    his
    > response was "What are you looking for?" I told him "A
    > bike for my wife." "What kind?" he replied. "Probably a
    > hybrid." I said. "What size?" he asked. "I'm not
    > sure...she needs to be sized up." He then brought my
    wife
    > to the closest female hybrid in the showroom, asked her to
    > get on, then asked "Does THAT feel like the right size?"
    > We bought my wife's bike somewhere else.

    You really should bring this to the owner's attention. He
    may have no idea what's going on when he's not there, and
    how he might be creating a more negative impression by being
    open (but not appropriately staffed) than if he were closed.

    I think I'm going to start thinking of this as the
    "nightmare thread." As in this is the type of nightmare I
    sometimes have, and my own shop is not immune. No shop is.
    But the defining difference between one shop and the next is
    how they deal with it.

    Talk to the owner. Please. Even if it's me (maybe ESPECIALLY
    if it's me!).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "NYRides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Claire:
    >
    > While I understand and respect the opinions of others who
    > have replied, I also understand exactly what you mean. It
    > isn't just bike shops, though. If storeowners only knew
    > how much business they lose by hiring unknowledgeable
    > sales people who are afraid to approach customers, they
    > would probably shape up pretty fast.
    >
    > I constantly walk out of stores with money burning a hole
    > in my pocket.
    One
    > day recently, I had $3,000 to spend on a laptop computer
    > that I absolutely needed the very next day. I walked into
    > a well-known national mega
    computer
    > chain store and found three young salespeople gathered
    > around a 23"
    monitor
    > playing a video game. I told them I needed to buy a
    > laptop in a hurry and that it was my first time buying
    > one. Without looking up from the screen, two of them
    > pointed me to the aisle with the laptops and one said
    > "The laptops are over there." Needless to say, I walked
    > out after two minutes
    of
    > trying to sell myself a laptop.
    >
    > Even more recently, I walked into my neighborhood bike
    > shop on a Sunday to buy my wife the brand new bicycle I'd
    > been promising her forever. We're both really busy and
    > this was the only time we could arrange to shop for
    the
    > bike together. Again, the money was in my pocket and there
    > was no way we weren't buying a bike that day. Well, it was
    > Sunday, and the owner, whom
    I
    > know very well and really wanted to give the business,
    > decided to take the day off and leave two high school kids
    > running the store. My wife and I walked in and started
    > fumbling our way through the hundreds of bikes on display.
    > I even pulled a few from the racks to size her up. In all
    > the time we were shopping, the two kids at the counter
    > never even looked up
    from
    > their conversation about "hot chicks." When I asked if one
    > could help,
    his
    > response was "What are you looking for?" I told him "A
    > bike for my wife." "What kind?" he replied. "Probably a
    > hybrid." I said. "What size?" he asked. "I'm not
    > sure...she needs to be sized up." He then brought my
    wife
    > to the closest female hybrid in the showroom, asked her to
    > get on, then asked "Does THAT feel like the right size?"
    > We bought my wife's bike somewhere else.
    >
    > This happens to me all the time, and I've made a habit of
    > skipping out of stores that do this to me. I guess I'm
    > just getting old. I used to like
    to
    > be left alone when I was shopping, but that was when I was
    > young and
    thought
    > I knew more about everything than anybody. Now that I'm
    > older and realize I'm not so smart, I need to be "sold" by
    > salesperson before I'll buy anything. My final example is
    > the $150,000 home renovation for which my
    wife
    > and I are trying to book contractors, designers, and
    > architects. Highly-recommended tradespeople of all sorts
    > have been escorted out our
    door
    > for making the same mistake: They ask us "what we want"
    > and tell us "they'll do whatever we want." We've made it
    > clear to all these people
    that
    > we need guidance, that we've never done this before and we
    > need input from experienced professionals. Still, they
    > come to the house and get
    frustrated
    > if we don't know whether we want flush beams or soffits in
    > our kitchen.
    The
    > first kitchen designer who said to us "This is what you do
    > and here's why" got a big gig out of us.
    >
    > I think store owners should take this as a warning. The
    > biggest reason people still shop in retail stores, rather
    > than buying things cheaper online, is for the interaction
    > with knowledgeable salespeople who can
    guide
    > us through the selection and buying process. Once that
    > benefit is eliminated, we might as well all buy blindly
    > via the Internet.
    >
    > ."Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote
    > in message news:[email protected]_s53...
    > > Yesterday, I went to my former bike shop. I bought my
    > > first roadie shoes there, my first bicycle computer, and
    > > my first SPD pedals, and they did
    > lots
    > > of work on my bike for a while. But the one decent guy
    > > who worked there left, and I didn't see much reason to
    > > remain as their customer.
    > >
    > > My reasons for not being their customer any more was
    > > underscored when I
    > went
    > > in to the bike shop. The only reason why I was in there
    > > was I had
    business
    > > at another store in the strip mall, and I thought I'd
    > > stop by. So I
    did --
    > > why not?
    > >
    > > Three employees were sitting around (literally -- in
    > > folding chairs, in
    > the
    > > center of the store) talking to each other. I came in,
    > > and headed to
    their
    > > more expensive road bikes. I fingered the merchandise,
    > > and talked to my daughter about what I'd be interested
    > > in, in a new bike. I went over to
    > the
    > > clothing, and rummaged through the 30% off on all 2003
    > > bike clothes
    rack.
    > I
    > > peered into the case at the counter.
    > >
    > > Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    > > interested in, try
    to
    > > sell me a bike, clothes, or accessories. For that
    > > matter, considering
    that
    > > probably two of them were wrenches, were any of them
    > > working on bikes.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Warm Regards,
    > >
    > > Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-
    > > potato and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    > > http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm See the
    > > books I've set free at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
    > >
    >
     
  18. Claire: You were a victim of one of the most maddening
    things to a bike shop owner... clumping. That's what I call
    it when the employees get together and talk amongst
    themselves, instead of taking care of customers.

    Customers... yuck... what if they ask me about something I
    don't know much about?

    Customers... they don't seem to care so much about that
    gnarly 24 hour mountain bike race I just completed, and why
    should they, the closest they'll ever come to a real trail
    will be the picture in the brochure.

    Customers... egad, it's only an hour until closing, what if
    they want to buy a $2,000 bike with $500 worth of
    accessories, causing me to miss my 8pm show on TV?

    Why would you ever want to help a customer? So much more
    interesting to talk to the other employees!

    The real irony is that this goes on most often when a store
    is relatively quiet. When things are busy, people do what
    they're supposed to do. But if things are quiet, or a store
    is overstaffed, customers are often neglected.

    We (shop owners & employees) have to remember why we're
    here. It's to take care of the people who come in the door
    and help us pay our bills. We need to remember (especially
    for those of us whose stores aren't located in busy shopping
    centers) that people don't accidentally stumble into our
    shops. And we need to remember that, while *we* might have a
    clue about where to find things in our store, a newcomer
    doesn't. And we also must remember that, even though many
    people seem to think we're supposed to be able to read their
    minds, we can't... which means we have to actually ask
    people what brought them by today.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]_s52...
    > "Lars Lehtonen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > According to Claire Petersky <[email protected]
    > > potato.com>:
    > >
    > > >Never once did anyone greet me, ask what I might be
    > > >interested in, try to sell me a bike, clothes, or
    > > >accessories. For that matter, considering that probably
    > > >two of them were wrenches, were any of them working on
    > > >bikes.
    > >
    > > You'd rather they were breathing down your neck sparring
    > > with one another for the measly 1% commission that some
    > > shops pay? That sounds miserable.
    >
    > Having worked retail, what I would have done was: hauled
    > my bulk out of my folding chair, turned to the shopper,
    > and said something like: "looking at those Treks? Need any
    > help?" If the person replied something like, "no,
    just
    > browsing", then I'd say, "OK, just let me know if you need
    > anything", and then settled myself back down on my folding
    > chair. This isn't breathing
    down
    > necks, this is acknowledging the presence of another
    > human being.
    >
    > I also suspect, but have no evidence for, that strikes
    > against me were my age, and me looking at road bikes.
    > Being female was also probably against me, too, as I was
    > therefore not to be taken seriously -- although probably
    a

    > respect.
    >
    > > I'm sure if you asked for help they would have been
    > > happy to talk bikes with you.
    >
    > Nah, they were too busy talking amongst themselves. I
    > didn't want to interrupt them.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    > Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato
    > and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm See the
    > books I've set free at:
    > http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  19. Claire:

    I'm expanding your fame & notoriety; I've taken your
    original post, as well as a few clips from some of the follow-
    ups, and posted them to the NBDA (National Bicycle Dealer
    Association) email list. Hopefully, it will have a
    positive effect on the retail environment with at least a
    few dealers.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  20. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 1 Jun 2004 14:53:27 -0700, <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:

    > Rick Onanian <[email protected]> writes:
    >> (Tom Keats) wrote:
    >>>Flashing a big wad of cash sometimes works, too.
    >>
    >> Doesn't work in one Warwick, RI store. On more than
    >> one occasions, I've stood unattended for ten or twenty
    >> minutes at the cash register with cash visible in one
    >> hand and something I want to purchase in the other.
    >> I'd say this is my experience for at least 40% of my
    >> visits there.
    >
    >That's when i'd be sorely tempted to open the cash
    >register, ring-up and pay in full for my purchase, take
    >whatever change I have coming, take my receipt, and shove
    >the cash drawer closed again. I've never done it, but one
    >of these days ...
    >
    >It's a fun fantasy, anyways.
    >
    I've had occasion to ask, in a loud voice, "Does
    anybody want to play store today?" or just call out,
    "Who works here?"
    --
    zk
     
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