Formula for saddle setback/seatpost adjustment?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dave Smith, May 21, 2003.

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  1. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    I used to ride my beloved Serotta touring bike thousands of miles a year. Now that I'm 53, it's more
    like hundreds. I've been feeling too stretched out on it lately and I'd like to try moving my saddle
    forward a bit as it's set almost all the way back now. I've had some knee problems in the past and
    want to keep my saddle height the same. Is there a formula for adjusting saddle height to compensate
    for changes in saddle setback or should I just measure it? Is it even significant?

    Thanks very much for any help.
     
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  2. Eric Murray

    Eric Murray Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I used to ride my beloved Serotta touring bike thousands of miles a year. Now that I'm 53, it's
    >more like hundreds. I've been feeling too stretched out on it lately and I'd like to try moving my
    >saddle forward a bit as it's set almost all the way back now. I've had some knee problems in the
    >past and want to keep my saddle height the same. Is there a formula for adjusting saddle height to
    >compensate for changes in saddle setback or should I just measure it? Is it even significant?

    Don't move your saddle to correct the reach to the bars. Get a shorter stem instead. Its natural for
    riders as they get older to want a higher position and possibly less reach. Althouhg riding more
    will get you used to your position, to some extent.

    But do check your saddle's position-- sometimes saddles will gradually slip rearwards over months of
    riding, resulting in a position that is farther back than intended.

    Traditional measurement is to position the saddle so that a plumbline dropped from the kneecap
    intersects the pedal axle (cranks level). Some riders, usually those that spin the pedals, prefer a
    more forwards positon. Others who like to grind the pedals like a more rearward position.

    Eric
     
  3. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I used to ride my beloved Serotta touring bike thousands of miles a year. Now that I'm 53, it's
    > more like hundreds. I've been feeling too stretched out on it lately and I'd like to try moving my
    > saddle forward a bit as it's set almost all the way back now. I've had some knee problems in the
    > past and want to keep my saddle height the same. Is there a formula for adjusting saddle height to
    > compensate for changes in saddle setback or should I just measure it? Is it even significant?

    If you're happy with your current seat height, it's easier to just measure it now, and then
    adjust/measure again after moving the saddle forward.

    If your saddle is too far back, it MAY be a good idea to slide it forward. But that decision should
    be made independent of the the reach issue. If your position relative to the BB is good now, it
    would make more sense to change to a shorter stem. You might also experiment with bar height, bar
    tilt, and brake lever placement. These can all have a big effect on comfort.

    Art "also 53" Harris
     
  4. B

    B Guest

    >If your position relative to the BB is good now, it would make more sense to change to a shorter
    >stem. You might also experiment with bar height, bar tilt, and brake lever placement. These can all
    >have a big effect on comfort.

    I agree. My butt always tends to migrate to the same relative area irregardless of where the saddle
    is positioned. Move the bars. B (also 53) B

    (remove clothes to reply)
     
  5. Dave Smith
    > I used to ride my beloved Serotta touring bike thousands of miles a year. Now that I'm 53, it's
    > more like hundreds. I've been feeling too stretched out on it lately and I'd like to try moving my
    > saddle forward a bit as it's set almost all the way back now.

    You don't need rbt permission, go ahead!

    > I've had some knee problems in the past and want to keep my saddle height the same. Is there a
    > formula for adjusting saddle height to compensate for changes in saddle setback or should I just
    > measure it? Is it even significant?

    You may as well transfer your saddle height by measurement since you'd have to take some
    measurements to plug into a formula.

    I reckon you could do it all by feel anyway.

    Andrew Bradley
     
  6. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Thanks very much.

    The consensus here is right. I tried fooling with it and was not comfortable changing the saddle
    position. Rotated the bars a bit and got better results. May end up getting a shorter stem.

    On Wed, 21 May 2003 20:14:38 -0700, Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I used to ride my beloved Serotta touring bike thousands of miles a year. Now that I'm 53, it's
    >more like hundreds. I've been feeling too stretched out on it lately and I'd like to try moving my
    >saddle forward a bit as it's set almost all the way back now. I've had some knee problems in the
    >past and want to keep my saddle height the same. Is there a formula for adjusting saddle height to
    >compensate for changes in saddle setback or should I just measure it? Is it even significant?
    >
    >Thanks very much for any help.
     
  7. sally-dog-<< The consensus here is right. I tried fooling with it and was not comfortable
    changing the saddle position. Rotated the bars a bit and got better results. May end up getting a
    shorter stem.

    may save time and money and get a bike fit...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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