fortezza tires



A

Art Harris

Guest
Antti Salonen wrote:

> This may seem like a dumb question, but where does all this glass that
> keeps puncturing your tyres come from?


Mostly beer bottles. It used to be worse before most US states started
collecting a deposit on bottles and cans.

Art Harris
 
Antti Salonen writes:

>> That's true, if you ride in the automobiles' tire grooves, you will
>> get a nice smooth glass-free track. In my region, that would
>> involve certain death.


> This may seem like a dumb question, but where does all this glass
> that keeps puncturing your tyres come from? I can barely remember
> having a flat tyre while riding on the road, because they are
> generally clean from any debris. This is in Finland, but the roads
> in other European countries I've ridden in (Germany, Austria, Italy,
> etc.) are no worse in this regard.


http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/thorns.html

> Cycling or multi-use paths are a different story, but I would generally
> avoid them anyway. Roads, at least here, are much better for cycling.


Bicycle paths in the USA are often poorly maintained and used by
people among whom riding at a brisk pace is dangerous.

Jobst Brandt
 
Brian Phillips writes:

>> READ the Bicycle FAQ on "slicks:"
>> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/slicks.html


> While I could never feel any traction benefit of treaded tires vs.
> slicks on my bicycle, I have to disagree with Sheldon's comment in
> that article that "motorcycles have shown that tread patterns do not
> improve wet traction". If true then the MotoGP and Superbike guys
> wouldn't be pulling out the rain tires when it gets wet. If you've
> ever seen the rain tires used by motorcycle racers, they have LOTS
> of deep tread. Motorcycles are dealing with a lot more contact
> patch and much lower tire pressures than bicycles.


Racing rain tires use a different tread compound and while they are at
it (changing tires), they use a tread pattern that avoids problems
with deep water (more than 10mm). A road rider does not try to corner
hard on deep water. You'll notice that most fast road machines use
slicks in all weather.

Jobst Brandt
 

531Aussie

Well-Known Member
Apr 11, 2004
12,652
303
83
bicycle_disciple said:
hi guys,im going for a long ride this weekend,
-b.d
which Fortezzas do you have? Are they the new, all-black ones?

As others have said there are a few cheap models going around that aren't so good, and nowhere near as nice to ride as the Mondos -- and the Mondos ain't no Vittoria, neeva :)
I had a couple of treaded Fortezzas that were black with tan sidewalls, and they were horrible. The only Vredesteins I like are the Tricomps and the Super Lights. The Specialized Mondo and Mondo Pro feel ok; much better than the cheap Fortezzas, but not as good as other slicks I've used recently, such as the high-end Vittorias, Michelins, Schwalbe Stelvio Light, and the Vdredestein SL
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>,
"Chris Nelson" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Michael Press wrote:
> > In article
> > <[email protected]>,
> > "Chris Nelson" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > > That's a pathetic argument. Glass does not predictably congregate, its
> > > distribution is chaotic. To avoid the obvious groupings doesn't always
> > > work in the random acting region in which most of us Iive. Most flats
> > > occur from individual chards too small to see while perched on a
> > > bicycle at 20mph.

> >
> > The statement about glass does not hold. Glass is swept
> > out of the paths that automobile tires travel. It does
> > predictable congregate.

>
> That's true, if you ride in the automobiles' tire grooves, you will get
> a nice smooth glass-free track. In my region, that would involve
> certain death.


Go ahead, ride in the glass. I do not ride over glass.

--
Michael Press
 
C

Chris Nelson

Guest
Antti Salonen wrote:
> Chris Nelson <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > That's true, if you ride in the automobiles' tire grooves, you will get
> > a nice smooth glass-free track. In my region, that would involve
> > certain death.

>
> This may seem like a dumb question, but where does all this glass that
> keeps puncturing your tyres come from? I can barely remember having a
> flat tyre while riding on the road, because they are generally clean
> from any debris. This is in Finland, but the roads in other European
> countries I've ridden in (Germany, Austria, Italy, etc.) are no worse in
> this regard.
>
> Cycling or multi-use paths are a different story, but I would generally
> avoid them anyway. Roads, at least here, are much better for cycling.
>
> -as


What Art said.

Not surprising that Europe is more biker friendly. It seems to be a
more respected activity than here in the USA. Most of the bottle
throwing is from our youth, while most of the riders are of middle age,
hence the disrespect. I would imagine you have a much higher percentage
of 20 year olds riding than we do.
 
J

John Forrest Tomlinson

Guest
On 2 May 2006 16:20:25 GMT, Antti Salonen
<[email protected]> wrote:

>This may seem like a dumb question, but where does all this glass that
>keeps puncturing your tyres come from?


Dumbasses who litter with bottles. Too common in the United States.
On rare occasion from other sources -- like I flatted once on glass
from a broken car headlamp.

JT

****************************
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G

Günther Schwarz

Guest
John Forrest Tomlinson wrote:

> On 2 May 2006 16:20:25 GMT, Antti Salonen
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>This may seem like a dumb question, but where does all this glass that
>>keeps puncturing your tyres come from?

>
> Dumbasses who litter with bottles. Too common in the United States.


So it seems there is at least one good reason for having our local rules
on bottle deposit. With increasing gaz prices people may not be able to
litter their bottles from car windows any more.

Günther
 
B

Brian Phillips

Guest
Don't mean to beat a dead horse, especially off topic, but I follow
motorcycle road racing pretty closely and have been in the pits at MotoGP,
World Superbike and AMA Superbike events and have examined their rain tires
up close; they are nothing close to slicks, so not true that "fast road
machines use slicks in all weather". True, the compound is very different;
very soft. So much so that if they were to ride them on dry pavement, they'd
be wasted in a lap or so. My point is that what may be true for bicycles
(slicks being just as effective as treaded tires even in the wet) doesn't
equate to motorcycles.



<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Brian Phillips writes:
>
> >> READ the Bicycle FAQ on "slicks:"
> >> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/slicks.html

>
> > While I could never feel any traction benefit of treaded tires vs.
> > slicks on my bicycle, I have to disagree with Sheldon's comment in
> > that article that "motorcycles have shown that tread patterns do not
> > improve wet traction". If true then the MotoGP and Superbike guys
> > wouldn't be pulling out the rain tires when it gets wet. If you've
> > ever seen the rain tires used by motorcycle racers, they have LOTS
> > of deep tread. Motorcycles are dealing with a lot more contact
> > patch and much lower tire pressures than bicycles.

>
> Racing rain tires use a different tread compound and while they are at
> it (changing tires), they use a tread pattern that avoids problems
> with deep water (more than 10mm). A road rider does not try to corner
> hard on deep water. You'll notice that most fast road machines use
> slicks in all weather.
>
> Jobst Brandt
 
Art Harris wrote:
> Antti Salonen wrote:
>
> > This may seem like a dumb question, but where does all this glass that
> > keeps puncturing your tyres come from?

>
> Mostly beer bottles. It used to be worse before most US states started
> collecting a deposit on bottles and cans.


"most US states"? Apparently I live in a different US than you. The
can I have in front of me has these states listed as requiring a
deposit. CA, MI (both 10 cents), ME, VT, MA, NY, HI, IA, OR, CT (all 5
cents). These redemption prices also apply to glass beer bottles. The
only nation wide bottle redemption is the 10 cents on the now
extinct(?) tall 16 ounce pop bottles. I don't think you can get glass
pop bottles except in that 16 ounce size, it its even available
anymore.

The only reasons it may be better now are 1. more traffic driving at
higher speeds on all roads to sweep the glass off the road better, and
2. almost all beer is sold in cans at convenience stores where the beer
containers thrown out car windows onto the roads is certainly
purchased.

>
> Art Harris
 
A

Art Harris

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Art Harris wrote:
> > Mostly beer bottles. It used to be worse before most US states started
> > collecting a deposit on bottles and cans.

>
> "most US states"? Apparently I live in a different US than you. The
> can I have in front of me has these states listed as requiring a
> deposit. CA, MI (both 10 cents), ME, VT, MA, NY, HI, IA, OR, CT (all 5
> cents).


Well, let's say most of the progressive states.

Hmm, 10 cents in MI. Now if I could load up a mail truck with empties
from NY... Nah, it's been tried before.

Art Harris