Fractured collar bone

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bob Smith, Feb 21, 2004.

  1. Bob Smith

    Bob Smith Guest

    I originally posted this on rec.sport.rowing but it was suggested that cyclists have a lot more
    experience in this area. I hope someone can help.

    I fractured my collar bone last August and the last two pieces joined up at the beginning of
    January. Two weeks ago they separated again.

    The two ends overlap by just over an inch.

    There seem to be three options:

    1. Do nothing and just live with the non-union
    2. Have the bone pinned in its current position
    3. Have the bone ends trimmed and fixed end to end with a plate

    If possible I would like to contact some people who have experienced one (or more) of these options.

    Currently my favourite is option 2 because I know that while the collar bone was joined I was able
    to use the ergometer without discomfort, although obviously with very low effort, and most of my
    shoulder mobility had already returned. With option 1 I suspect I would be reluctant to apply full
    effort to any shoulder work. Option 3 seems to be more complex and with a greater risk of failure
    for mainly cosmetic benefits.

    All helpful suggestions welcome.

    Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. Bob Smith wrote:

    > I originally posted this on rec.sport.rowing but it was suggested that cyclists have a lot more
    > experience in this area. I hope someone can help.
    >
    > I fractured my collar bone last August and the last two pieces joined up at the beginning of
    > January. Two weeks ago they separated again.
    >
    > The two ends overlap by just over an inch.
    >
    > There seem to be three options:
    >
    > 1. Do nothing and just live with the non-union
    > 2. Have the bone pinned in its current position
    > 3. Have the bone ends trimmed and fixed end to end with a plate
    >
    > If possible I would like to contact some people who have experienced one (or more) of these
    > options.
    >
    > Currently my favourite is option 2 because I know that while the collar bone was joined I was able
    > to use the ergometer without discomfort, although obviously with very low effort, and most of my
    > shoulder mobility had already returned. With option 1 I suspect I would be reluctant to apply full
    > effort to any shoulder work. Option 3 seems to be more complex and with a greater risk of failure
    > for mainly cosmetic benefits.
    >
    > All helpful suggestions welcome.
    >
    > Thanks.

    I assume you had a non-union of the fracture. If it is a new fracture, I think most doctors
    would just let it heal. I fractured my left clavicle 10 years ago, at age 42. Certainly my
    healing was slower than the young pups, but it did heal. I have the typical step deformity of
    this kind of fracture. I believe the doctors are a little concerned about tissue damage to
    the surrounding area (including some very major blood vessels) if you have free bone ends.
    Either way, your shoulder mobility shouldn't be affected much. Your doctor will be better
    prepared to discuss the risks of doing nothing. The other issue is which type of repair is
    less likely to have postop problems. Certainly pinning in the current position sounds much
    easier than trying to line up and fuse the fractured ends, and it may have a better chance of
    achieving a stable union.

    Good luck, Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
    Brooklyn, NY
    718-258-5001
    http://www.dentaltwins.com
     
  3. Dashi

    Dashi Guest

    "Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Bob Smith wrote:
    >
    >> I originally posted this on rec.sport.rowing but it was suggested that cyclists have a lot more
    >> experience in this area. I hope someone can help.
    >>
    >> I fractured my collar bone last August and the last two pieces joined up at the beginning of
    >> January. Two weeks ago they separated again.
    >>
    >> The two ends overlap by just over an inch.
    >>
    >> There seem to be three options:
    >>
    >> 1. Do nothing and just live with the non-union
    >> 2. Have the bone pinned in its current position
    >> 3. Have the bone ends trimmed and fixed end to end with a plate
    >>
    >> If possible I would like to contact some people who have experienced one (or more) of these
    >> options.
    >>
    >> Currently my favourite is option 2 because I know that while the collar bone was joined I was
    >> able to use the ergometer without discomfort, although obviously with very low effort, and most
    >> of my shoulder mobility had already returned. With option 1 I suspect I would be reluctant to
    >> apply full effort to any shoulder work. Option 3 seems to be more complex and with a greater risk
    >> of failure for mainly cosmetic benefits.
    >>
    >> All helpful suggestions welcome.
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >
    > I assume you had a non-union of the fracture. If it is a new fracture, I think most doctors
    > would just let it heal. I fractured my left clavicle 10 years ago, at age 42. Certainly my
    > healing was slower than the young pups, but it did heal. I have the typical step deformity of
    > this kind of fracture. I believe the doctors are a little concerned about tissue damage to the
    > surrounding area (including some very major blood vessels) if you have free bone ends. Either
    > way, your shoulder mobility shouldn't be affected much.

    I disagree with this. My shoulder mobility was affected very much, so much in fact that I was unable
    to raise my arm above shoulder level.

    Diagnosis: Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis.

    Very bad stuff, took me six months of physical therapy to get well.

    Dashi

    > Your doctor will be better prepared to discuss the risks of doing nothing. The other issue is
    > which type of repair is less likely to have postop problems. Certainly pinning in the current
    > position sounds much easier than trying to line up and fuse the fractured ends, and it may have
    > a better chance of achieving a stable union.
    >
    > Good luck, Steve
    >
    >
    > --
    > Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS Brooklyn, NY 718-258-5001 http://www.dentaltwins.com
     
  4. Bob Smith

    Bob Smith Guest

    Steve and Dashi

    Thanks for your comments.

    It was the same fracture that separated rather than a fresh fracture. The problem with doctors is
    they all have different opinions - that's where the three options came from, so I think I have to
    decide what I want and then find someone to do it. This is why I am trying to discover how other
    people have been affected.

    I'm also a bit concerned about healing being slower with age if it's left to heal itself as I will
    be 57 in May and want to be competing again this year rather than next year.

    Thanks again.

    Bob
     
  5. Dashi

    Dashi Guest

    "Bob Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Steve and Dashi
    >
    > Thanks for your comments.
    >
    > It was the same fracture that separated rather than a fresh fracture. The problem with doctors is
    > they all have different opinions - that's where the three options came from, so I think I have to
    > decide what I want and then find someone to do it. This is why I am trying to discover how other
    > people have been affected.
    >
    > I'm also a bit concerned about healing being slower with age if it's left to heal itself as I will
    > be 57 in May and want to be competing again this year rather than next year. Bob

    Happened to me when I was 58, no problem with the collar bone healing, but the Adhesive Capsulitis
    was a terrible experience, never want that to happen again.

    Dashi
     
  6. Dashi wrote:
    > "Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>
    >>Bob Smith wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I originally posted this on rec.sport.rowing but it was suggested that cyclists have a lot more
    >>>experience in this area. I hope someone can help.
    >>>
    >>>I fractured my collar bone last August and the last two pieces joined up at the beginning of
    >>>January. Two weeks ago they separated again.
    >>>
    >>>The two ends overlap by just over an inch.
    >>>
    >>>There seem to be three options:
    >>>
    >>>1. Do nothing and just live with the non-union
    >>>2. Have the bone pinned in its current position
    >>>3. Have the bone ends trimmed and fixed end to end with a plate
    >>>
    >>>If possible I would like to contact some people who have experienced one (or more) of these
    >>>options.
    >>>
    >>>Currently my favourite is option 2 because I know that while the collar bone was joined I was
    >>>able to use the ergometer without discomfort, although obviously with very low effort, and most
    >>>of my shoulder mobility had already returned. With option 1 I suspect I would be reluctant to
    >>>apply full effort to any shoulder work. Option 3 seems to be more complex and with a greater risk
    >>>of failure for mainly cosmetic benefits.
    >>>
    >>>All helpful suggestions welcome.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks.
    >>
    >> I assume you had a non-union of the fracture. If it is a new fracture, I think most doctors
    >> would just let it heal. I fractured my left clavicle 10 years ago, at age 42. Certainly my
    >> healing was slower than the young pups, but it did heal. I have the typical step deformity of
    >> this kind of fracture. I believe the doctors are a little concerned about tissue damage to the
    >> surrounding area (including some very major blood vessels) if you have free bone ends. Either
    >> way, your shoulder mobility shouldn't be affected much.
    >
    >
    > I disagree with this. My shoulder mobility was affected very much, so much in fact that I was
    > unable to raise my arm above shoulder level.
    >
    > Diagnosis: Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis.
    >
    > Very bad stuff, took me six months of physical therapy to get well.
    >
    > Dashi

    Sorry to hear this. I assume your fracture was fairly distal and involved the AC joint? Did
    you have surgery? In any case you did pretty much regain your shoulder mobility? My
    fracture, BTW was about 2/3 of the way from my sternum to my AC joint.

    Steve

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >> Your doctor will be better prepared to discuss the risks of doing nothing. The other issue is
    >> which type of repair is less likely to have postop problems. Certainly pinning in the current
    >> position sounds much easier than trying to line up and fuse the fractured ends, and it may have
    >> a better chance of achieving a stable union.
    >>
    >>Good luck, Steve
    >>
    >>
    >>--
    >>Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS Brooklyn, NY 718-258-5001 http://www.dentaltwins.com
    >>
    >>
    >
     
  7. Dashi

    Dashi Guest

    "Steven Bornfeld" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Dashi wrote:
    >> "Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Bob Smith wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I originally posted this on rec.sport.rowing but it was suggested that cyclists have a lot more
    >>>>experience in this area. I hope someone can help.
    >>>>
    >>>>I fractured my collar bone last August and the last two pieces joined up at the beginning of
    >>>>January. Two weeks ago they separated again.
    >>>>
    >>>>The two ends overlap by just over an inch.
    >>>>
    >>>>There seem to be three options:
    >>>>
    >>>>1. Do nothing and just live with the non-union
    >>>>2. Have the bone pinned in its current position
    >>>>3. Have the bone ends trimmed and fixed end to end with a plate
    >>>>
    >>>>If possible I would like to contact some people who have experienced one (or more) of these
    >>>>options.
    >>>>
    >>>>Currently my favourite is option 2 because I know that while the collar bone was joined I was
    >>>>able to use the ergometer without discomfort, although obviously with very low effort, and most
    >>>>of my shoulder mobility had already returned. With option 1 I suspect I would be reluctant to
    >>>>apply full effort to any shoulder work. Option 3 seems to be more complex and with a greater
    >>>>risk of failure for mainly cosmetic benefits.
    >>>>
    >>>>All helpful suggestions welcome.
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks.
    >>>
    >>> I assume you had a non-union of the fracture. If it is a new fracture, I think most doctors
    >>> would just let it heal. I fractured my left clavicle 10 years ago, at age 42. Certainly my
    >>> healing was slower than the young pups, but it did heal. I have the typical step deformity of
    >>> this kind of fracture. I believe the doctors are a little concerned about tissue damage to the
    >>> surrounding area (including some very major blood vessels) if you have free bone ends. Either
    >>> way, your shoulder mobility shouldn't be affected much.
    >>
    >>
    >> I disagree with this. My shoulder mobility was affected very much, so much in fact that I was
    >> unable to raise my arm above shoulder level.
    >>
    >> Diagnosis: Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis.
    >>
    >> Very bad stuff, took me six months of physical therapy to get well.
    >>
    >> Dashi
    >
    > Sorry to hear this. I assume your fracture was fairly distal and involved the AC joint? Did you
    > have surgery? In any case you did pretty much regain your shoulder mobility? My fracture, BTW was
    > about 2/3 of the way from my sternum to my AC joint.
    >
    > Steve

    Thanks for the note of sympathy but I am almost 100% now, 2 years after the accident.

    When I fell I landed on my right scapula which caused my collar bone to shatter. I didn't go over
    the handlebars but off of the side of the mountain bike.

    I visited a surgeon once a month while in physical therapy (Air Force hospital) so that he could
    guage my progress. He decided against surgery.

    I believe that the collar bone fracture was secondary to the shoulder injury.

    I do believe in preventive medicine now, I don't do anything stupid on a bike anymore. :->

    Hope that you are fully recovered also.

    Dashi
     
  8. Dashi wrote:
    > "Steven Bornfeld" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>
    >>Dashi wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Bob Smith wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I originally posted this on rec.sport.rowing but it was suggested that cyclists have a lot more
    >>>>>experience in this area. I hope someone can help.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I fractured my collar bone last August and the last two pieces joined up at the beginning of
    >>>>>January. Two weeks ago they separated again.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The two ends overlap by just over an inch.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>There seem to be three options:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>1. Do nothing and just live with the non-union
    >>>>>2. Have the bone pinned in its current position
    >>>>>3. Have the bone ends trimmed and fixed end to end with a plate
    >>>>>
    >>>>>If possible I would like to contact some people who have experienced one (or more) of these
    >>>>>options.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Currently my favourite is option 2 because I know that while the collar bone was joined I was
    >>>>>able to use the ergometer without discomfort, although obviously with very low effort, and most
    >>>>>of my shoulder mobility had already returned. With option 1 I suspect I would be reluctant to
    >>>>>apply full effort to any shoulder work. Option 3 seems to be more complex and with a greater
    >>>>>risk of failure for mainly cosmetic benefits.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>All helpful suggestions welcome.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>> I assume you had a non-union of the fracture. If it is a new fracture, I think most doctors
    >>>> would just let it heal. I fractured my left clavicle 10 years ago, at age 42. Certainly my
    >>>> healing was slower than the young pups, but it did heal. I have the typical step deformity of
    >>>> this kind of fracture. I believe the doctors are a little concerned about tissue damage to the
    >>>> surrounding area (including some very major blood vessels) if you have free bone ends. Either
    >>>> way, your shoulder mobility shouldn't be affected much.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I disagree with this. My shoulder mobility was affected very much, so much in fact that I was
    >>>unable to raise my arm above shoulder level.
    >>>
    >>>Diagnosis: Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis.
    >>>
    >>>Very bad stuff, took me six months of physical therapy to get well.
    >>>
    >>>Dashi
    >>
    >>Sorry to hear this. I assume your fracture was fairly distal and involved the AC joint? Did you
    >>have surgery? In any case you did pretty much regain your shoulder mobility? My fracture, BTW was
    >>about 2/3 of the way from my sternum to my AC joint.
    >>
    >>Steve
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the note of sympathy but I am almost 100% now, 2 years after the accident.
    >
    > When I fell I landed on my right scapula which caused my collar bone to shatter. I didn't go over
    > the handlebars but off of the side of the mountain bike.
    >
    > I visited a surgeon once a month while in physical therapy (Air Force hospital) so that he could
    > guage my progress. He decided against surgery.
    >
    > I believe that the collar bone fracture was secondary to the shoulder injury.
    >
    > I do believe in preventive medicine now, I don't do anything stupid on a bike anymore. :->
    >
    > Hope that you are fully recovered also.
    >
    > Dashi
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Pretty much. My orthopedist said I'd never model swimsuits anymore, and damned if she
    wasn't right!

    Steve
     
  9. Bob Smith

    Bob Smith Guest

    Steven Bornfeld <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Dashi wrote:
    > > "Steven Bornfeld" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>
    > >>Dashi wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>"Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>>news:[email protected]...
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>Bob Smith wrote:
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>>I originally posted this on rec.sport.rowing but it was suggested that cyclists have a lot
    > >>>>>more experience in this area. I hope someone can help.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>I fractured my collar bone last August and the last two pieces joined up at the beginning of
    > >>>>>January. Two weeks ago they separated again.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>The two ends overlap by just over an inch.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>There seem to be three options:
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>1. Do nothing and just live with the non-union
    > >>>>>2. Have the bone pinned in its current position
    > >>>>>3. Have the bone ends trimmed and fixed end to end with a plate
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>If possible I would like to contact some people who have experienced one (or more) of these
    > >>>>>options.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>Currently my favourite is option 2 because I know that while the collar bone was joined I was
    > >>>>>able to use the ergometer without discomfort, although obviously with very low effort, and
    > >>>>>most of my shoulder mobility had already returned. With option 1 I suspect I would be
    > >>>>>reluctant to apply full effort to any shoulder work. Option 3 seems to be more complex and
    > >>>>>with a greater risk of failure for mainly cosmetic benefits.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>All helpful suggestions welcome.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>Thanks.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> I assume you had a non-union of the fracture. If it is a new fracture, I think most doctors
    > >>>> would just let it heal. I fractured my left clavicle 10 years ago, at age 42. Certainly my
    > >>>> healing was slower than the young pups, but it did heal. I have the typical step deformity
    > >>>> of this kind of fracture. I believe the doctors are a little concerned about tissue damage
    > >>>> to the surrounding area (including some very major blood vessels) if you have free bone
    > >>>> ends. Either way, your shoulder mobility shouldn't be affected much.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>I disagree with this. My shoulder mobility was affected very much, so much in fact that I was
    > >>>unable to raise my arm above shoulder level.
    > >>>
    > >>>Diagnosis: Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis.
    > >>>
    > >>>Very bad stuff, took me six months of physical therapy to get well.
    > >>>
    > >>>Dashi
    > >>
    > >>Sorry to hear this. I assume your fracture was fairly distal and involved the AC joint? Did you
    > >>have surgery? In any case you did pretty much regain your shoulder mobility? My fracture, BTW
    > >>was about 2/3 of the way from my sternum to my AC joint.
    > >>
    > >>Steve
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks for the note of sympathy but I am almost 100% now, 2 years after the accident.
    > >
    > > When I fell I landed on my right scapula which caused my collar bone to shatter. I didn't go
    > > over the handlebars but off of the side of the mountain bike.
    > >
    > > I visited a surgeon once a month while in physical therapy (Air Force hospital) so that he could
    > > guage my progress. He decided against surgery.
    > >
    > > I believe that the collar bone fracture was secondary to the shoulder injury.
    > >
    > > I do believe in preventive medicine now, I don't do anything stupid on a bike anymore. :->
    > >
    > > Hope that you are fully recovered also.
    > >
    > > Dashi
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > Pretty much. My orthopedist said I'd never model swimsuits anymore, and damned if she wasn't
    > right!
    >
    > Steve

    I broke mine in a quad bike race when I hit a rut and rolled. Some ribs broke too but they healed
    quite quickly, the collar bone was complicated by having several pieces at the distal end. I'm not
    into modelling either fortunately.

    Anyway, I have decided that I will definitely have surgery, it's just a choice now of which way to
    do it. And I've set myself the target of beating my PB at the British Indoor Rowing Championship in
    November. I probably won't race quad bikes again - they won't harm me but my wife would kill me :)

    Bob
     
  10. Bob Smith wrote:

    >
    > I broke mine in a quad bike race when I hit a rut and rolled. Some ribs broke too but they healed
    > quite quickly, the collar bone was complicated by having several pieces at the distal end. I'm not
    > into modelling either fortunately.
    >
    > Anyway, I have decided that I will definitely have surgery, it's just a choice now of which way
    > to do it. And I've set myself the target of beating my PB at the British Indoor Rowing
    > Championship in November. I probably won't race quad bikes again - they won't harm me but my wife
    > would kill me :)
    >
    > Bob

    Hope that's a realistic goal--sounds like a lot of shoulder in that! My wife also said she'd
    kill me if I crash again!

    Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
    Brooklyn, NY
    718-258-5001
    http://www.dentaltwins.com
     
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