Frame Damage from Fall?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Robin Burns, Feb 10, 2003.

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  1. Robin Burns

    Robin Burns Guest

    I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light because I didn't get my feet out of the
    pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner mistake, I know...)

    There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart from a slight scuff on the left rear QR
    skewer. Should I take the bike to a shop for a more detailed inspection, or is this type of
    zero-speed crash unlikely to damage the frame?
     
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  2. Garry N

    Garry N Guest

    "Robin Burns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light because I didn't get my feet out of the
    > pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner mistake, I know...)
    >
    > There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart from a slight
    scuff
    > on the left rear QR skewer. Should I take the bike to a shop for a more detailed inspection, or is
    > this type of zero-speed crash unlikely to
    damage
    > the frame?
    >
    It is more important to know if anyone else saw you fall. If so, then of course you need to get the
    frame looked at because the only reason you fell is because something wasn't right!!! If no one saw
    you , then no need to get her looked at. You may want to stop by the shop to get some new kewel
    skewers or something.... Garry
     
  3. If the only visual cue is a scuffed-up quick release, and the wheels remain straight, and the bike
    rides fine, I don't think I'd be worried about it. Just don't let it happen again where there are
    any witnesses.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReaction.com

    "Robin Burns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light because I didn't get my feet out of the
    > pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner mistake, I know...)
    >
    > There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart from a slight
    scuff
    > on the left rear QR skewer. Should I take the bike to a shop for a more detailed inspection, or is
    > this type of zero-speed crash unlikely to
    damage
    > the frame?
     
  4. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Robin Burns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light
    because I didn't
    > get my feet out of the pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner
    mistake, I
    > know...)
    >
    > There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart
    from a slight scuff
    > on the left rear QR skewer. Should I take the bike to a
    shop for a more
    > detailed inspection, or is this type of zero-speed crash
    unlikely to damage
    > the frame?

    I wouldn't worry about it.

    Matt O.
     
  5. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Robin Burns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light because I didn't get my feet out of the
    > pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner mistake, I know...)
    >
    > There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart from a slight
    scuff
    > on the left rear QR skewer. Should I take the bike to a shop for a more detailed inspection, or is
    > this type of zero-speed crash unlikely to
    damage
    > the frame?
    >

    The frame is probably seriously fooked up. You need to send it to me for ...ahem...disposal. ;^)

    Mike
     
  6. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Robin Burns <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light because I didn't get my feet out of the
    >pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner mistake, I know...)
    >
    >There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart from a slight scuff on the left rear QR
    >skewer. Should I take the bike to a shop for a more detailed inspection, or is this type of
    >zero-speed crash unlikely to damage the frame?

    Most ti frames are pretty tough. About the only way to damage one in the situation you describe
    above would be to fall heavily on the frame (even that may well not be enough).

    You can easily check at least the gross frame alignment by threading a string through one rear
    dropout, around the head tube and back to the other rear dropout. Then measure from the string to
    the seat tube where the string passes closest. It should be the same on both sides.

    The lawyer in me says that other things COULD have happened, so it would be a good idea for someone
    to make sure you didn't damage the handlebar or stem.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  7. Robin Burns wrote:

    > I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light because I didn't get my feet out of the
    > pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner mistake, I know...)

    Is there anybody on this list who hasn't done this at least once?

    > There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart from a slight scuff on the left rear QR
    > skewer. Should I take the bike to a shop for a more detailed inspection, or is this type of
    > zero-speed crash unlikely to damage the frame?

    Extremely unlikely. Don't worry, just ride.

    Sheldon "I've Still Got My Scuffed Dura-Ace 7400 Pedals" Brown
    +--------------------------------------------------------------+
    | The man who does not read good books has no advantage over | the man who can't read them. --Mark
    | Twain |
    +--------------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
    Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light because I didn't get my feet out of the
    >pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner mistake, I know...)
    >
    >There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart from a slight scuff on the left rear QR
    >skewer. Should I take the bike to a shop for a more detailed inspection, or is this type of
    >zero-speed crash unlikely to damage the frame?

    There was probably more damage to your ego than your bike.
    -------------------
    Alex
     
  9. On Mon, 10 Feb 2003 19:48:59 -0500, Robin Burns wrote:

    > I recently fell over on my new Ti frame bike at a light because I didn't get my feet out of the
    > pedals in time (yeah, dumb beginner mistake, I know...)
    >
    > There doesn't appear to be any damage to the bike apart from a slight scuff on the left rear QR
    > skewer. Should I take the bike to a shop for a more detailed inspection, or is this type of
    > zero-speed crash unlikely to damage the frame?

    If your frame is so delicate that a fall like that is going to damage it, it will be extremely
    unlikely that it will last very long. I should hope that no damage would result from that kind of
    fall -- heck, everyone has done that. Of course, there are freak accidents, but it is unlikely, and
    most damage from a fall like that would be visible.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Accept risk. Accept responsibility. Put a lawyer out of _`\(,_ | business. (_)/ (_) |
     
  10. On Mon, 10 Feb 2003 21:00:42 -0500, Mark Hickey wrote:

    > Most ti frames are pretty tough. About the only way to damage one in the situation you describe
    > above would be to fall heavily on the frame (even that may well not be enough).

    I'll vouch for that -- at least for Mark's frames. When I whined about the clearances being so tight
    that my tire rubbed on the chain bridge, Mark suggested a fix involving a mallet. At first I lightly
    tapped the bridge, but after that had no effect I was swinging away pretty freely in order to deform
    that bridge even a small amount. I got a millimeter or two, that was all. And that was with a lead
    mallet, not some wimpy rubber thing.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "Business!" cried the Ghost. "Mankind was my business. The _`\(,_ | common welfare was my
    business; charity, mercy, forbearance, (_)/ (_) | and benevolence, were, all, my business. The
    dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!"
    --Dickens, "A Christmas Carol"
     
  11. Dave Jackson

    Dave Jackson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Is there anybody on this list who hasn't done this at least once?

    I have while pulling a kiddy cart. I was stopping to wait up for my wife and got leaning the wrong
    way and couldn't get my foot out. Funny thing is that I had been riding clipless for about 5 years
    at that time with no troubles.

    Dave (still have a scuffed brake lever) in Minnesota
     
  12. Ajames54

    Ajames54 Guest

    On Tue, 11 Feb 2003 14:20:05 GMT, Dave Jackson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Is there anybody on this list who hasn't done this at least once?
    >
    >I have while pulling a kiddy cart. I was stopping to wait up for my wife and got leaning the wrong
    >way and couldn't get my foot out. Funny thing is that I had been riding clipless for about 5 years
    >at that time with no troubles.
    >
    >Dave (still have a scuffed brake lever) in Minnesota

    I did it for the first time ever about a year ago, riding a friends bike... didn't realize until the
    last moment that you can't get out of clips and straps by just flicking your heel... lots of witness
    too... it was at a club ride.
     
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