Frame mounted 'nurse' locks - source found

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mike Gayler, May 25, 2003.

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  1. Mike Gayler

    Mike Gayler Guest

    A while ago there was a thread about so-called nurse locks as found on continental bikes - jaws
    which clamp round the rear wheel, and attatched to the rear triangle (you know what I mean!)

    This site has them http://www.accutype.demon.co.uk/bonus.htm I can't vouch for the quality as I've
    only just ordered one (and got a response from the site owner almost immediately), but the price is
    attractive for a secondary lock.

    Mike Leicester
     
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  2. Rg

    Rg Guest

    "Mike Gayler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A while ago there was a thread about so-called nurse locks as found on continental bikes - jaws
    > which clamp round the rear wheel, and attatched
    to
    > the rear triangle (you know what I mean!)
    >
    > This site has them http://www.accutype.demon.co.uk/bonus.htm I
    can't
    > vouch for the quality as I've only just ordered one (and got a response from the site owner almost
    > immediately), but the price is attractive for a secondary lock.
    >
    > Mike Leicester

    Look a bit flimsy to me - the real thing (AXA, as fitted as "standard" on Dutch bikes) is available
    mail order from http://www.bicycleworkshop.co.uk/products.php?mcat=2&scat=93 - they cost a bit more
    but are heavy duty and rustproof.

    Rob
     
  3. Tim Dunne

    Tim Dunne Guest

    "Mike Gayler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A while ago there was a thread about so-called nurse locks as found on continental bikes - jaws
    > which clamp round the rear wheel, and attatched
    to
    > the rear triangle (you know what I mean!)

    Search for AXA SL7...

    http://www.nervouscyclist.org/Lock.htm

    HTH

    Tim

    --
    Sent from Birmingham, UK... Check out www.nervouscyclist.org 'When you're under the USA, someone
    rings a bell and it's all over'
    - David Bowie, 'Day In, Day Out'. My 'reply to' address is valid, mail to the posting
    address is dumped
     
  4. Mads Hilberg

    Mads Hilberg Guest

    > Look a bit flimsy to me - the real thing (AXA, as fitted as "standard" on Dutch bikes) is
    > available mail order from http://www.bicycleworkshop.co.uk/products.php?mcat=2&scat=93 - they cost
    > a bit more but are heavy duty and rustproof.

    Of course it's even better when they are welded into/onto the frame as is the case on many
    continental city bikes.

    Also, I have better experience with the BASTA Click 2 style locks than the SL7.

    Any of these locks should be pretty effective in the UK as the thieves there aren't used to
    the design.

    Mads
     
  5. "Mads Hilberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > Of course it's even better when they are welded into/onto the frame as is the case on many
    > continental city bikes.
    >

    And also some British ones - Raleigh incorporated lots of good ideas into their Freedom range
    (integral rear-wheel locks, factory-fitted dynamo sets with the wiring neatly hidden, etc.), only to
    short-sightedly drop the product line a couple of years later.

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  6. On 27 May 2003 05:13:02 -0700, contributor David E. Belcher had scribed:
    > And also some British ones - Raleigh incorporated lots of good ideas into their Freedom range
    > (integral rear-wheel locks, factory-fitted dynamo sets with the wiring neatly hidden, etc.), only
    > to short-sightedly drop the product line a couple of years later.
    >

    Who remembers the steering lock which was part of some Raleigh frames, particularly those with the
    thread for the gear case bolt.

    Gary

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    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

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  7. John B

    John B Guest

    Gary Knighton wrote:

    > On 27 May 2003 05:13:02 -0700, contributor David E. Belcher had scribed:
    > > And also some British ones - Raleigh incorporated lots of good ideas into their Freedom range
    > > (integral rear-wheel locks, factory-fitted dynamo sets with the wiring neatly hidden, etc.),
    > > only to short-sightedly drop the product line a couple of years later.
    > >
    >
    > Who remembers the steering lock which was part of some Raleigh frames, particularly those with the
    > thread for the gear case bolt.

    My father had a big sit-up-and-beg Raleigh that had a steering lock built into the fork crown. I
    remember the key had to be entered from the side.

    I had a mini-saddle mounted on his cross bar and he used to take me down to the seaside (Hill Head
    and Lee-on-Solent) from the strawberry farm we lived on.

    These are some of my very earliest memories of anything.

    John B
     
  8. On Tue, 01 Jul 2003 15:02:14 +0100, contributor John B had scribed:
    > My father had a big sit-up-and-beg Raleigh that had a steering lock built into the fork crown. I
    > remember the key had to be entered from the side.
    >

    That is the beast, apparently there were only 50 key/lock combinations. Do you remember if the chain
    was fully enclosed? In case the bicycle was more likely than not a Raleigh Superb.

    > I had a mini-saddle mounted on his cross bar and he used to take me down to the seaside (Hill Head
    > and Lee-on-Solent) from the strawberry farm we lived on.
    >

    I remember that too, the saddle, not the excursion. The one I rode, as a passenger, had a wire back.
    I think I was seven years old when I last rode on that tiny saddle.

    Gary

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    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
  9. In message <[email protected]> Gary Knighton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 27 May 2003 05:13:02 -0700, contributor David E. Belcher had scribed:
    > > And also some British ones - Raleigh incorporated lots of good ideas into their Freedom range
    > > (integral rear-wheel locks, factory-fitted dynamo sets with the wiring neatly hidden, etc.),
    > > only to short-sightedly drop the product line a couple of years later.
    > >
    >
    > Who remembers the steering lock which was part of some Raleigh frames, particularly those with the
    > thread for the gear case bolt.
    >
    > Gary
    >
    Remember it? I still have it in use on my current bike, bought in 1955! I don't understand your
    remark about the gear-case bolt though.

    The only reason I need a new bike this year is that the rear rim (stainless steel!) has developed a
    hole. I'm still using the 2nd set of brake-blocks, whereas a neighbour with rusty rims has to change
    his regularly...

    Best wishes, Robin.

    --
    Robin Phillips, Beeston, Notts., NG9 1BT Phone: 0115 922 4930 http://www.beeston12.freeserve.co.uk/
     
  10. On Sat, 05 Jul 2003 22:36:45 +0100, contributor Robin Phillips had scribed:
    > Remember it? I still have it in use on my current bike, bought in 1955! I don't understand your
    > remark about the gear-case bolt though.
    >

    The gear case bolt is the one which attaches the gear case to the point on the frame where there is
    a specific thread for the purpose.

    > The only reason I need a new bike this year is that the rear rim (stainless steel!) has developed
    > a hole. I'm still using the 2nd set of brake-blocks, whereas a neighbour with rusty rims has to
    > change his regularly...
    >

    Presumably rod brakes, Pashley still use them for the posties' bikes and so spare rims should still
    be available.

    Gary

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
  11. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Gary Knighton" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 05 Jul 2003 22:36:45 +0100, contributor Robin Phillips had
    scribed:
    > > Remember it? I still have it in use on my current bike, bought in 1955!
    I
    > > don't understand your remark about the gear-case bolt though.
    > >
    >
    > The gear case bolt is the one which attaches the gear case to the point on the frame where there
    > is a specific thread for the purpose.
    >
    > > The only reason I need a new bike this year is that the rear rim
    (stainless
    > > steel!) has developed a hole. I'm still using the 2nd set of
    brake-blocks,
    > > whereas a neighbour with rusty rims has to change his regularly...
    > >
    >
    > Presumably rod brakes, Pashley still use them for the posties' bikes and
    so
    > spare rims should still be available.
    >

    http://www.cyclesofyesteryear.com/cycleshop/sparepart.htm
     
  12. On Mon, 7 Jul 2003 16:21:26 +0100, contributor Tony W had scribed:
    > > Presumably rod brakes, Pashley still use them for the posties' bikes and
    > so
    > > spare rims should still be available.
    > >
    >
    > http://www.cyclesofyesteryear.com/cycleshop/sparepart.htm
    >

    Well spotted. Note, the text "*note fully enclosed guards will only fit frames with rear fork stays
    which are bolted to the frame.", it is not the stays which are bolted to the frame but the gearcase
    which is bolted to the stays.

    Following the gearcase, the chrome nose mudguards brought back memories.

    Gary

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
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