Frame or bike upgrade?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by teacherguy, May 17, 2006.

  1. teacherguy

    teacherguy New Member

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    I have been out of cycling for about eight years now and have recently redeveloped the itch. I got out my 13 year old Bianchi Giro and was amazed at how uncomfortable the geometry was. I guess I am too old to have my head lower than my butt. I would love a new bike but the wife is on maternity leave so money is tight. My componants are Campy Athena 8spd. Not state-of-the-art but the controls are dual control and they have relatively few miles. Would it be sensible to buy a used frame with modern geometry? I would also be looking for a carbon fork and would need a new headset, stem, bar, and seat post. I could get a decent frame/ fork and other needed items for around $400 whereas a low-end bike would be $700 with Sora componants. I was told that even low grade Shimano would work better than my dated Campy pieces. Is this true? Any input will be appreciated.
     
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  2. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    I am not an expert in valuation of bicycles or components, but I know Campagnolo (even dated Campagnolo) will sell for a reasonable price, so some people would disagree that any new Shimano would be better...

    There are plenty of people riding older Campy equipment than you have, and are extremely happy with it. (Check out the classic & vintage section on bikeforums.net for some examples).

    If your objective is to get on the road, then perhaps you should think smaller... How about a Nitto Technomics stem to raise the bars? This would only require a new stem, cables, housings and bar tape. This should be feasible if the only issue with the bike is the amount of drop between the seat and the bars...

    If there are more issues, how about selling your current bike and using the income to buy (at least partially) a replacement?
     
  3. John M

    John M New Member

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    I agree with dgregory that you could do a few relatively inexpensive things to get the fit on the old bike to be more comfortable. Frame geometry for road bikes has changed very little in the last 10 years, with the exception of the availability of sloping top tube frames. It is true that the of the low priced Shimano is a good value for the money, the original Campy Ergo stuff is very good. Perhaps a tune-up and a refitting of the current bike (new stem, maybe saddle). A carbon fork would also not be any better functionally (or comfort) that the steel fork that is probably on that Giro. Lighter yes, but better?? Probably not much.

    I also agree that you could sell the Bianchi whole or in parts and maybe get some fairly good money for it.
     
  4. teacherguy

    teacherguy New Member

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    The geometry is the biggest concern but I would love to upgrade to aluminum as my Bianchi is all chromoly. Anybody know what a 93' Bianchi Giro is worth?
     
  5. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    Why aluminum? From what I have heard, aluminum is not necessarily better or lighter than a nice chromoly frame.

    I just did a search for Bianchi Giros on eBay, and didn't see any older ones that were sold recently... If any have been sold, that is usually a good source for used bike prices, since it represents what someone actually paid.

    Along with components and condition, what you can get for your bike will depend on where you are, the size and whether someone is actually looking for one right now. :)
     
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