frame painting advice needed

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Matt Egger, Oct 28, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Matt Egger

    Matt Egger Guest

    I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I need to do something to
    prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    is.

    The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match the frame would be cool. I've
    been searching the web for frame painters. I'm pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could use any
    suggestions from anyone with experience.

    The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself (probably black). Any advice for
    this route?

    TIA,

    Matt
     
    Tags:


  2. Matt Egger

    Matt Egger Guest

    Matt Egger <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I need to do something to
    > prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option is.
    >
    > The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match the frame would be cool.
    > I've been searching the web for frame painters. I'm pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could
    > use any suggestions from anyone with experience.
    >
    > The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself (probably black). Any advice for
    > this route?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Matt
    >

    Just painting the fork only...

    Matt
     
  3. Grenouil

    Grenouil Guest

    "Matt Egger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork
    (aluminum). I know I need
    > to do something to prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure
    what my best option
    > is.
    >
    > The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having
    the fork match the
    > frame would be cool. I've been searching the web for
    frame painters. I'm
    > pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could use any
    suggestions from anyone
    > with experience.
    >
    > The other option I've been mulling over is painting it
    myself (probably
    > black). Any advice for this route?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Matt

    If you want something fairly economic, save on shipping costs and check the yellow pages or do a web
    search for a local powder coater,.

    I got quotes locally from $50 to $120 in the Nashville area - the painters offering lower prices
    generally have a limited selection available - depends what they're running at the time. Black
    should be very easy to find.

    I ended up paying $75 for frame and fork, and am very pleased with the job.
     
  4. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Matt Egger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I
    need
    > to do something to prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    > is.
    >

    My opinion is to have it done professionally, powder coated or painted. Home paint jobs just never
    work right...I've seen many and they've all been, IMHO, crap. If it's worth putting paint on in the
    first place, it's worth $40 to do it right.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  5. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Matt Egger <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I need to do something to
    > prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    > is.
    >

    if its aluminum, you dont really need to paint it. when it oxidizes, it will just look dull. it wont
    be compromised or vulnerable the way steel is.

    > The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match the frame would be cool.
    > I've been searching the web for frame painters. I'm pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could
    > use any suggestions from anyone with experience.

    go crosscheck! woohoo! we will rule the world!

    >
    > The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself (probably black). Any advice for
    > this route?

    been there. done that. i would do it again if:

    -i still had access to a nice air compressor -my left over paint is still good -i could find a spray
    booth to use -i have a lot of time to burn

    its a lot of work, to do it right. for a small part like a fork, i bet a local powdercoater would be
    your best bet, especially if you want somethign simple like black. should be fairly cheap. to paint
    it yourself with industry standard stuff it would cost you a lot of money, becuase you cant buy very
    small quantities of any of the various paints and chemicals, etc. you could do a rattle-can job. the
    archives of rbt, and of the framebuilders list, has various posts on this. definitely the
    framebuilders list. to get a good finish with spray paint ive heard advocates of post-spray baking.
    this is generally pooh-poohed by folks who couldnt fit a frame into their kitchen oven (without s&s
    couplers..). but youre only doing a fork..

    whatever works, anthony
     
  6. On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 17:43:30 +0000, S. Anderson wrote:

    > My opinion is to have it done professionally, powder coated or painted. Home paint jobs just never
    > work right...I've seen many and they've all been, IMHO, crap. If it's worth putting paint on in
    > the first place, it's worth $40 to do it right.

    Absolutely. I pissed away more in spray cans, and exposure to known carcinogens, trying to paint my
    own frame than I did, subsequently, when I took it to a powder coater.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Arguing with an engineer is like mud wrestling with a pig... You _`\(,_ | soon find out the
    pig likes it! (_)/ (_) |
     
  7. ant wrote:

    > if its aluminum, you dont really need to paint it. when it oxidizes, it will just look dull. it
    > wont be compromised or vulnerable the way steel is.

    Unless they salt the roads where the OP lives. This might accelerate cracking.
     
  8. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 19:35:30 GMT, Matt Egger <[email protected]> may have said:

    >I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I need to do something to
    >prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    >is.
    >
    >The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match the frame would be cool. I've
    >been searching the web for frame painters. I'm pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could use any
    >suggestions from anyone with experience.

    Aluminum is a pain in the neck to paint. It's hard to get anything to stick to it for long unless
    you have access to professional materials and equipment.

    >The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself (probably black). Any advice for
    >this route?

    How about a good coat of wax instead? Nice, shiny aluminum is pretty, and if it's going to corrode,
    not having an opaque coating on the surface will allow you to see it happening sooner...and in my
    experience, with available consumer-grade paints, you're just as well off to leave it bare in the
    first place. YMMV.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  9. Q.

    Q. Guest

    Why not anodize?

    C.Q.C."Matt Egger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I
    need
    > to do something to prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    > is.
    >
    > The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match the frame would be cool.
    > I've been searching the web for frame painters. I'm pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could
    > use any suggestions from
    anyone
    > with experience.
    >
    > The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself (probably black). Any advice for
    > this route?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Matt
     
  10. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    Matt Egger <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I need to do something to
    > prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    > is.
    >
    > The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match the frame would be cool.
    > I've been searching the web for frame painters. I'm pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could
    > use any suggestions from anyone with experience.
    >
    > The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself (probably black). Any advice for
    > this route?

    After seeing your 'advice' I suppose that you ought to actually get some.

    You don't usually paint aluminum forks. They don't degrade like steel.

    Moreover, home methods of painting bicycles are not very effective because the paints that come in
    cans are very soft and peel and scratch very easy.

    And painting aluminum is particularly difficult since the same minute layer of oxidation that
    protects the aluminum from further degradation makes a surface to which very few paints will stick.

    Just put the fork on as is and don't worry about it.
     
  11. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    [email protected] (Tom Kunich) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Matt Egger <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I need to do something to
    > > prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    > > is.
    > >
    > > The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match the frame would be cool.
    > > I've been searching the web for frame painters. I'm pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could
    > > use any suggestions from anyone with experience.
    > >
    > > The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself (probably black). Any advice for
    > > this route?
    >
    > After seeing your 'advice' I suppose that you ought to actually get some.
    >
    > You don't usually paint aluminum forks. They don't degrade like steel.
    >
    > Moreover, home methods of painting bicycles are not very effective because the paints that come in
    > cans are very soft and peel and scratch very easy.
    >
    > And painting aluminum is particularly difficult since the same minute layer of oxidation
    > that protects the aluminum from further degradation makes a surface to which very few paints
    > will stick.
    >
    > Just put the fork on as is and don't worry about it.

    Dear Tom,

    I'm puzzled by your opening line. It seems to sneer at Matt Egger's 'advice,' but since this is the
    only post that I can find from him, this explanation seems unlikely unless a feud is deeply buried.

    Possibly you meant to sneer at the 'advice' given to Matt Egger by earlier posters about how to
    paint his fork a color that he likes? If so, the "your" would be just a poorly chosen word.

    But the earlier adice hardly seem worth a snarl. I see six suggestions before yours: powder coat,
    powder coat, powder coat, either don't paint or else powder coat, wax, and why not anodize--with
    comments about how hard it is to paint aluminum.

    What baffles me is that your advice after that odd first line seems so clear, sensible, and
    courteous, summarizing nicely what some early posts pointed out.

    So I'm hoping that you'll clear up this puzzle for me--either I'm totally misunderstanding you,
    I'm missing something obvious, or your mood changed remarkably for the better after your first
    thirteen words.

    Just curious.

    Carl Fogel
     
  12. Erik Brooks

    Erik Brooks Guest

    Matt Egger <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I need to do something to
    > prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    > is.
    >

    I've got an aluminum fork on one bike. I have no idea what if any finish it has on it, just as I
    have no idea what if any finish is on my other alu bits, like my cranks and deraillers. In any case,
    they are all years old now, and all look very nice, IMHO. The painted frame, ITOH, has a bunch of
    chips by now, as do the painted forks on my other bikes.

    I'm happier with the appearance of the alu fork. Silver looks good with any other color. Why do you
    think you need to do anything? Just wondering.

    Erik
     
  13. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    > "Matt Egger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...

    > > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I
    > need
    > > to do something to prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best option
    > > is.
    > >
    > > The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match the frame would be cool.
    > > I've been searching the web for frame painters. I'm pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could
    > > use any suggestions from
    > anyone
    > > with experience.

    "Q." <LostVideos-AT-hotmail.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Why not anodize?

    I think you'll find that one-off anodizing of a bike part will be quite expensive, more than a
    professional paint job. Anodizing itself is cheap, but the guy who runs the local shop will probably
    pull a big number out of the air, in dealing with a one-off order.

    Powder coat is definately the way to go, for both cost and durability. Also, have you called Surly
    to see if they can paint it, or send you to their painter? That would sure simplify the color match.

    > > The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself (probably black). Any advice for
    > > this route?

    Forget it, unless you already do this kind of thing regularly -- painting cars, etc.

    Matt O.
     
  14. Q.

    Q. Guest

    <snip>
    >I think you'll find that one-off anodizing of a bike part will be quite expensive, more than a
    >professional paint job. Anodizing itself is cheap,
    but
    > the guy who runs the local shop will probably pull a big number out of the
    air,
    > in dealing with a one-off order.
    >
    > Powder coat is definately the way to go, for both cost and durability.
    Also,
    > have you called Surly to see if they can paint it, or send you to their
    painter?
    > That would sure simplify the color match.
    <snip>

    I realize one off anodizing could be expensive ... however, I've anodized lots of little things. The
    OP mentioned they wanted it black, and black is done all the time. My local anodize has no problem
    doing small parts in black, since all he has to do is throw it into someone else's batch. He makes a
    quick buck with hardly any extra effort. However, if the OP wants it purple I'm sure then we would
    be talking a special order.

    You can also anodize at home ... and powdercoat for that matter. I believe the Eastwood company
    deals in a lot of that.

    The only think that has kept me away from powdercoating aluminum, is the high temperatures the metal
    has to be heated to.

    C.Q.C.

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > "Matt Egger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > > I just got an unfinished kinesis crosslight fork (aluminum). I know I
    > > need
    > > > to do something to prevent oxidation, but I'm not sure what my best
    option
    > > > is.
    > > >
    > > > The bike is a '99 bean green surly cross-check. Having the fork match
    the
    > > > frame would be cool. I've been searching the web for frame painters.
    I'm
    > > > pretty overwhelmed by the choices and could use any suggestions from
    > > anyone
    > > > with experience.
    >
    > "Q." <LostVideos-AT-hotmail.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Why not anodize?
    >
    > I think you'll find that one-off anodizing of a bike part will be quite expensive, more than a
    > professional paint job. Anodizing itself is cheap,
    but
    > the guy who runs the local shop will probably pull a big number out of the
    air,
    > in dealing with a one-off order.
    >
    > Powder coat is definately the way to go, for both cost and durability.
    Also,
    > have you called Surly to see if they can paint it, or send you to their
    painter?
    > That would sure simplify the color match.
    >
    > > > The other option I've been mulling over is painting it myself
    (probably
    > > > black). Any advice for this route?
    >
    > Forget it, unless you already do this kind of thing regularly -- painting
    cars,
    > etc.
    >
    > Matt O.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...