Frame pump recommendations



K

Király

Guest
I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
disposable junk, I want something that will last.

These things are a must:

-durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
-it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
spare parts
-it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
-long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
-should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.

These things would also be nice:

-double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
high pressure easier)
-it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge

These things are less important:

-weight (I'm not too concerned that what I want might be much heavier
than a cheapo plastic pump, but I obviously don't want to be lugging a
floor pump around)
-cost. I am willing to pay good money for something that is of good
quality and will last.

Most pumps I see in LBSes these days are these shorty little
lightweight plastic things. Not for me. The Topeak looks like it might
fit the bill. Has anyone used one?

Thanks for any suggestions.

--
K.

Te tetted e tettetett tettet? Te tettetett tettek tettese, te!
 
http://www.topeak.com/2006/products/minipumps/roadmorphg.php
A Topeak Morph with or without gauge.

Király wrote:
> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> disposable junk, I want something that will last.
>
> These things are a must:
>
> -durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
> -it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
> spare parts
> -it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
> -long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
> -should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>
> These things would also be nice:
>
> -double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
> both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
> high pressure easier)
> -it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge
>
> These things are less important:
>
> -weight (I'm not too concerned that what I want might be much heavier
> than a cheapo plastic pump, but I obviously don't want to be lugging a
> floor pump around)
> -cost. I am willing to pay good money for something that is of good
> quality and will last.
>
> Most pumps I see in LBSes these days are these shorty little
> lightweight plastic things. Not for me. The Topeak looks like it might
> fit the bill. Has anyone used one?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions.
>
> --
> K.
>
> Te tetted e tettetett tettet? Te tettetett tettek tettese, te!
 
Z

Zog The Undeniable

Guest
Király wrote:

> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> disposable junk, I want something that will last.


Truflo hpX, the pump formerly known as Zefal hpX.
 
W

Wilfred Kazoks

Guest
I can recommend the Zefal HPX. Mine is over 20 years old. Bit scuffed now
but still works as good as ever.

Wilfred
"Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Király wrote:
>
>> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
>> disposable junk, I want something that will last.

>
> Truflo hpX, the pump formerly known as Zefal hpX.
 
S

Skippy

Guest
"Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Király wrote:
>
>> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
>> disposable junk, I want something that will last.

>
> Truflo hpX, the pump formerly known as Zefal hpX.


I concur. Good pump.

Skippy
E&OE
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
Király wrote:
> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> disposable junk, I want something that will last.


Blackburn..

>
> These things are a must:
>
> -durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
> -it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
> spare parts
> -it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
> -long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
> -should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>
> These things would also be nice:
>
> -double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
> both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
> high pressure easier)
> -it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge
>
> These things are less important:
>
> -weight (I'm not too concerned that what I want might be much heavier
> than a cheapo plastic pump, but I obviously don't want to be lugging a
> floor pump around)
> -cost. I am willing to pay good money for something that is of good
> quality and will last.
>
> Most pumps I see in LBSes these days are these shorty little
> lightweight plastic things. Not for me. The Topeak looks like it might
> fit the bill. Has anyone used one?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions.
>
> --
> K.
>
> Te tetted e tettetett tettet? Te tettetett tettek tettese, te!
 
R

richard

Guest
Zefal (Truflo?) HpX or Blackburn. I've not seen it, but I think Topeak
now makes a frame fit as well. (The Morph is a great pump, but it's
heavy and the mounting is ugly.)

I'd go with whatever the local shop has and has a good supply of spare
parts for. On the other hand, the Zefal has been around for like 20-25
years, so parts for those should be plentiful.

Király wrote:
> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> disposable junk, I want something that will last.
>
> These things are a must:
>
> -durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
> -it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
> spare parts
> -it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
> -long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
> -should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>
> These things would also be nice:
>
> -double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
> both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
> high pressure easier)
> -it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge
>
> These things are less important:
>
> -weight (I'm not too concerned that what I want might be much heavier
> than a cheapo plastic pump, but I obviously don't want to be lugging a
> floor pump around)
> -cost. I am willing to pay good money for something that is of good
> quality and will last.
>
> Most pumps I see in LBSes these days are these shorty little
> lightweight plastic things. Not for me. The Topeak looks like it might
> fit the bill. Has anyone used one?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions.
>
 
K

Ken C. M.

Guest
Király wrote:
> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> disposable junk, I want something that will last.
>
> These things are a must:
>
> -durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
> -it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
> spare parts
> -it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
> -long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
> -should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>
> These things would also be nice:
>
> -double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
> both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
> high pressure easier)
> -it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge
>
> These things are less important:
>
> -weight (I'm not too concerned that what I want might be much heavier
> than a cheapo plastic pump, but I obviously don't want to be lugging a
> floor pump around)
> -cost. I am willing to pay good money for something that is of good
> quality and will last.
>
> Most pumps I see in LBSes these days are these shorty little
> lightweight plastic things. Not for me. The Topeak looks like it might
> fit the bill. Has anyone used one?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions.
>


Go with a Topeak Road Morp. With a guage. Great pump.

Ken
--
New cycling jersey: $49
new cycling shorts: $39
Not being a slave to the petrol pump: priceless.
 
D

David L. Johnson

Guest
On Sat, 20 May 2006 22:45:52 +0000, Király wrote:

> -durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
> -it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
> spare parts
> -it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
> -long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
> -should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>
> These things would also be nice:
>
> -double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
> both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
> high pressure easier)
> -it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge


I don't know why you don't want the gauge, but the Topeak Road Morph is
the best pump I've ever had. I usually volunteer to inflate the tires of
those who flat on rides, since I want to get back moving. It's faster
than any full-frame pump. I don't count the strokes, but it's reasonable,
and you get 120psi or more easily. Really. Several times people will say
to put as much in as I can. I ask them what pressure they want, and they
are usually surprised when the 100-120 they ask for is not a problem.
I've never not been able to get to the pressure people want --- though I
haven't gone past 120. With most mini-pumps, people seem happy to get
80psi and just hope that will get them home.

Mine is maybe 4 years old, and has gotten a fair amount of use, mostly on
other people's tires. I did have the first one break (developed a leak),
but I stopped by REI where I bought it and groused about it, and they
gave me a new one. So, I don't know how hard they are to repair.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | "Business!" cried the Ghost. "Mankind was my business. The
_`\(,_ | common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance,
(_)/ (_) | and benevolence, were, all, my business. The dealings of my
trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my
business!" --Dickens, "A Christmas Carol"
 
R

Robin Hubert

Guest
David L. Johnson wrote:
> On Sat, 20 May 2006 22:45:52 +0000, Király wrote:
>
>
>>-durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
>>-it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
>> spare parts
>>-it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
>>-long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
>>-should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>>
>>These things would also be nice:
>>
>>-double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
>> both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
>> high pressure easier)
>>-it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge

>
>
> I don't know why you don't want the gauge, but the Topeak Road Morph is
> the best pump I've ever had. I usually volunteer to inflate the tires of
> those who flat on rides, since I want to get back moving. It's faster
> than any full-frame pump. I don't count the strokes, but it's reasonable,
> and you get 120psi or more easily.


That's impossible. The Morphe has less stroke volume than the Road
Master Blaster frame fit pump. How could it be faster?

> Really. Several times people will say
> to put as much in as I can. I ask them what pressure they want, and they
> are usually surprised when the 100-120 they ask for is not a problem.
> I've never not been able to get to the pressure people want --- though I
> haven't gone past 120. With most mini-pumps, people seem happy to get
> 80psi and just hope that will get them home.
>
> Mine is maybe 4 years old, and has gotten a fair amount of use, mostly on
> other people's tires. I did have the first one break (developed a leak),
> but I stopped by REI where I bought it and groused about it, and they
> gave me a new one. So, I don't know how hard they are to repair.
>


Todson (Topeak) offers repair kits to shops. All parts are replaceable.


Robin Hubert
 
B

Brian Phillips

Guest
My Zefal HPX is only about 12 years old, but it still works great...
unfortunately, when I bought a new carbon fiber bike this year, I discovered
a frame pump doesn't fit well in it, so I've had to resort to carrying Co2.

"Wilfred Kazoks" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I can recommend the Zefal HPX. Mine is over 20 years old. Bit scuffed now
> but still works as good as ever.
>
> Wilfred
> "Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Király wrote:
> >
> >> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> >> disposable junk, I want something that will last.

> >
> > Truflo hpX, the pump formerly known as Zefal hpX.

>
>
 
J

John Forrest Tomlinson

Guest
On Sun, 21 May 2006 13:26:33 -0700, "Brian Phillips"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>My Zefal HPX is only about 12 years old, but it still works great...
>unfortunately, when I bought a new carbon fiber bike this year, I discovered
>a frame pump doesn't fit well in it, so I've had to resort to carrying Co2.


There often are other ways to carry the frame pump than along the top
tube or seattube. For example, between the rear quickrelease and left
seatstay-seattube junction. This works on some swoopy carbon fiber
frames. Though pumps don't last so long in this position -- road
spray gets into them easily.

JT

****************************
Remove "remove" to reply
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R

Robin Hubert

Guest
John Forrest Tomlinson wrote:
> On Sun, 21 May 2006 13:26:33 -0700, "Brian Phillips"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>My Zefal HPX is only about 12 years old, but it still works great...
>>unfortunately, when I bought a new carbon fiber bike this year, I discovered
>>a frame pump doesn't fit well in it, so I've had to resort to carrying Co2.

>
>
> There often are other ways to carry the frame pump than along the top
> tube or seattube. For example, between the rear quickrelease and left
> seatstay-seattube junction. This works on some swoopy carbon fiber
> frames. Though pumps don't last so long in this position -- road
> spray gets into them easily.
>
> JT
>


I run one pump along my left seat stay. Due to physical constraints it
has to be mounted handle down. The handle and locking mechanism get
filled with grit on rainy rides and I have to clean it out before it'll
work (easy enough). On another bike I have the pump mounted more in the
line of fire, spray-wise, behind the seat tube, slightly off to the
left. However, since it's (same model pump) mounted with the handle up,
it never suffers the indignity of silt clogging. I don't like top tube
mounts because they get in the way of shouldering the bike. Perhaps one
bottle cage and an anterior seat tube oriented mount would solve the
problem for me.


Robin Hubert
 
P

Phil, Squid-in-Training

Guest
Robin Hubert wrote:
> David L. Johnson wrote:
>> On Sat, 20 May 2006 22:45:52 +0000, Király wrote:
>>
>>
>>> -durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
>>> -it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily
>>> available spare parts
>>> -it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
>>> -long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
>>> -should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>>>
>>> These things would also be nice:
>>>
>>> -double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels,
>>> use both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make
>>> pumping at high pressure easier)
>>> -it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge

>>
>>
>> I don't know why you don't want the gauge, but the Topeak Road Morph
>> is the best pump I've ever had. I usually volunteer to inflate the
>> tires of those who flat on rides, since I want to get back moving. It's
>> faster than any full-frame pump. I don't count the strokes, but
>> it's reasonable, and you get 120psi or more easily.

>
> That's impossible. The Morphe has less stroke volume than the Road
> Master Blaster frame fit pump. How could it be faster?


That's like asking how to cut a tree down: a saw or a steak knife?

The Morph-series portable floor pumps are far faster than any 120-capable
pump because you can pump against the ground instead of against your other
hand. You use less than half the effort (because you can use your body
weight and gravity to pump, something impossible with regular frame pumps),
and you don't get fatigued doing so. You don't use your frame pump to top
off your tires at home before a ride now, do you? You use the more
efficient floor pump.

I used the new Topeak Mini Morph yesterday, which doesn't have a gauge, and
it's so fast to pump up a MTB tire to 50psi that we didn't even bother
changing the flat... we were 20 minutes away from the parking lot. It's
tiny (fits in a jersey pocket) and you can push against the ground with this
one, too. Easily disassembled and serviced. It's pretty much a winner in
every category.

--
Phil
 
D

David L. Johnson

Guest
On Sun, 21 May 2006 18:35:42 +0000, Robin Hubert wrote:

> That's impossible. The Morphe has less stroke volume than the Road
> Master Blaster frame fit pump. How could it be faster?


Well, I've never used the Master Blaster, but you anchor the Road Morph
base on the ground, and pump vertically, rather than holding on to the
wheel and simultaneously holding the head on the valve, which limits your
stroke to what strength you have forcing your hands together. With
the Road Morph, you just put your weight behind the stroke. Less need for
strength, so faster.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | "What am I on? I'm on my bike, six hours a day, busting my ass.
_`\(,_ | What are you on?" --Lance Armstrong
(_)/ (_) |
 
T

Tuschinski

Guest
The HP from Zefal is the best frame pump by far.


Király wrote:
> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> disposable junk, I want something that will last.
>
> These things are a must:
>
> -durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
> -it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
> spare parts
> -it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
> -long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
> -should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>
> These things would also be nice:
>
> -double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
> both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
> high pressure easier)
> -it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge
>
> These things are less important:
>
> -weight (I'm not too concerned that what I want might be much heavier
> than a cheapo plastic pump, but I obviously don't want to be lugging a
> floor pump around)
> -cost. I am willing to pay good money for something that is of good
> quality and will last.
>
> Most pumps I see in LBSes these days are these shorty little
> lightweight plastic things. Not for me. The Topeak looks like it might
> fit the bill. Has anyone used one?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions.
>
> --
> K.
>
> Te tetted e tettetett tettet? Te tettetett tettek tettese, te!
 
T

Tim McTeague

Guest
My Blackburn FP-1 just keeps going. A while back the rubber insert in the
t-handle started coming apart so Blackburn sent me a new handle, not just
the rubber part, free. This year I found air started to leak once I got to
about 80psi. I asked the company for a new grommet and they send an entire
rebuild kit, also at no charge. I actually tried to "upgrade" to their new
carbon pump, just because it looks cool, but the large would not fit and the
medium was too small. Seems they changed the sizing from the previous
model.

Tim McTeague
 
J

john

Guest
Tim McTeague wrote:
> My Blackburn FP-1 just keeps going. A while back the rubber insert in the
> t-handle started coming apart so Blackburn sent me a new handle, not just
> the rubber part, free. This year I found air started to leak once I got to
> about 80psi. I asked the company for a new grommet and they send an entire
> rebuild kit, also at no charge. I actually tried to "upgrade" to their new
> carbon pump, just because it looks cool, but the large would not fit and the
> medium was too small. Seems they changed the sizing from the previous
> model.
>
> Tim McTeague


Wasn't/ isn't Blackburn owned by Bell? Isn't Bell the co. that turns
out junk daily w/ lousy customer service? Or am I mistaken?

Regards, John
 
K

Király

Guest
Thanks to all for the many useful suggestions. I'll visit some more
LBSes to see if they stock what's been suggested so I can compare.

--
K.

Te tetted e tettetett tettet? Te tettetett tettek tettese, te!
 
M

Mike Reed

Guest
Ditto. I have 2 HPXs, 12 and 8 years old (MTB and Road).

My HPX-4 gets a road 700x23c road tire to 90 psi in around 100 strokes.
Obviously, the longer the pump, the quicker it will go, but you have to
size for your frame.

My HPX-3 on the MTB seems to take 120 or so to get up to ~45psi on
2.25" tires, but at lower pressure, the strokes are pretty easy. It's a
road pump, so it's a little slower than some MTB pumps. Still, your
tire changing time is going to be most dependent on other parts of the
operation, not the pump choice.

I keep mine along my left seat-stay on the road bike, and along the
seat tube (butting into the left chain-stay) on the MTB. Never had a
problem with them there -- though I have to think twice grabbing when
hoising the bikes into the hooks in my garage. It's nice being able to
shoulder them w/out a pump in the way.

-Mike



Brian Phillips wrote:
> My Zefal HPX is only about 12 years old, but it still works great...
> unfortunately, when I bought a new carbon fiber bike this year, I discovered
> a frame pump doesn't fit well in it, so I've had to resort to carrying Co2.
>
> "Wilfred Kazoks" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > I can recommend the Zefal HPX. Mine is over 20 years old. Bit scuffed now
> > but still works as good as ever.
> >
> > Wilfred
> > "Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> > > Király wrote:
> > >
> > >> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> > >> disposable junk, I want something that will last.
> > >
> > > Truflo hpX, the pump formerly known as Zefal hpX.

> >
> >