Frame pump recommendations



D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Ken C. M.
([email protected]) wrote:
> Dave Larrington wrote:
> > Mine appears to read about 2 bar before I start using it...
> >

> Mine is similar, but accurate once you get over that pressure. I have
> used mine on medium pressure tires and found it to be accurate at those
> pressures (85 to 90psi)


I shall check against the gauge on the Joe Blow after the weekend, as I
had cause to use mine this morning.

Note to self: check wear on rear tyre /before/ it gets down to the
canvas in eleven separate places, thus necessitating a two mile walk in
the ipssnig rain...

However, I saw in the CTC rag yesterday that the gauge-free model is
still available, and if the OP *really* doesn't want a gauge, that'd be
my recommendation. I'd never go back to a frame-fitting pump.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
Frozen gorillas can be used to control the temperature of a warm and
stuffy room.
 
K

Ken C. M.

Guest
Dave Larrington wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, Ken C. M.
> ([email protected]) wrote:
>
>>Dave Larrington wrote:
>>
>>>Mine appears to read about 2 bar before I start using it...
>>>

>>
>>Mine is similar, but accurate once you get over that pressure. I have
>>used mine on medium pressure tires and found it to be accurate at those
>>pressures (85 to 90psi)

>
>
> I shall check against the gauge on the Joe Blow after the weekend, as I
> had cause to use mine this morning.
>
> Note to self: check wear on rear tyre /before/ it gets down to the
> canvas in eleven separate places, thus necessitating a two mile walk in
> the ipssnig rain...
>
> However, I saw in the CTC rag yesterday that the gauge-free model is
> still available, and if the OP *really* doesn't want a gauge, that'd be
> my recommendation. I'd never go back to a frame-fitting pump.
>

Well pumps are almost a thing of the past, except on tour maybe. Or if
you are so concerned about rolling resistance that you choose not to
ride on punture resistant tires. I have mostly been riding on a set of
Kendra kevlar belted tire, just replaced them with Panaracers with
kevlar belted and I have only had two punture flats on the Kendras' in
about 3500 miles. I don't know how the Panaracers will compare, but
being that flats seem to be a thing of past I might just go with a co2
inflater system, they seem smaller and lighter.

Ken
--
New cycling jersey: $49
new cycling shorts: $39
Not being a slave to the petrol pump: priceless.
 
B

bktourer1

Guest
Try checking the pump from this site. I have one and it works great.
FYI I have nothing to do with this firm.
www.outdoorsfrontier.com



Király wrote:
> I'm looking for a new, under-the-top-tube frame pump. I'm tired of
> disposable junk, I want something that will last.
>
> These things are a must:
>
> -durability (something made of steel or aluminum would be nice)
> -it can be disassembled, maintained, and repaired with readily available
> spare parts
> -it can pump both presta and schraeder up to 120 psi
> -long enough to fit underneath a 54cm top tube
> -should not take 400 strokes to inflate a tire.
>
> These things would also be nice:
>
> -double barrel (I had a mini frame pump once that had two barrels, use
> both for pumping at low pressure, and shut one off to make pumping at
> high pressure easier)
> -it should NOT come with a built-in pressure gauge
>
> These things are less important:
>
> -weight (I'm not too concerned that what I want might be much heavier
> than a cheapo plastic pump, but I obviously don't want to be lugging a
> floor pump around)
> -cost. I am willing to pay good money for something that is of good
> quality and will last.
>
> Most pumps I see in LBSes these days are these shorty little
> lightweight plastic things. Not for me. The Topeak looks like it might
> fit the bill. Has anyone used one?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions.
>
> --
> K.
>
> Te tetted e tettetett tettet? Te tettetett tettek tettese, te!
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Ken C. M.
([email protected]) wrote:

> Well pumps are almost a thing of the past, except on tour maybe.


(FX: Falls about laughing)

> Or if
> you are so concerned about rolling resistance that you choose not to
> ride on punture resistant tires. I have mostly been riding on a set of
> Kendra kevlar belted tire, just replaced them with Panaracers with
> kevlar belted and I have only had two punture flats on the Kendras' in
> about 3500 miles. I don't know how the Panaracers will compare, but
> being that flats seem to be a thing of past I might just go with a co2
> inflater system, they seem smaller and lighter.


Carrying n CO2 bottles invite n+1 visits from P+nct+r+ Fairy, if you ask
me...

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
It is not possible to call a complex number from a phone box.
 
A

Aeek

Guest
On Tue, 30 May 2006 14:33:44 +0100, Dave Larrington
<[email protected]> wrote:

>In article <[email protected]>, Ken C. M.
>([email protected]) wrote:
>
>> Well pumps are almost a thing of the past, except on tour maybe.

>
>(FX: Falls about laughing)


Can't go past a classic metal Zefal if you have the frame space.
A Topeak Roadmorph is compact and powerful, 100psi easy and the gauge
works well enough (it jumps).
 
A

Aeek

Guest
On Tue, 23 May 2006 00:45:32 +0100, "AndyMorris"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Untill recently I've always used standard LBS type frame fit pumps. The HpX
>is in a different class, its not light but its built like a tank and has no
>trouble at all getting up to high pressure. If only it had a gauge.


Mine has been bent by my bike frame over the years. Still works well!
Was pulled apart once by the LBS when it was sticking.
Was using it everyday before leaving work for the last 2 months,
too lazy to fix a slow leak until last weekend. So easy to use, and I
have NO arm strength.
Andre
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Aeek
([email protected]) wrote:

> Can't go past a classic metal Zefal if you have the frame space.
> A Topeak Roadmorph is compact and powerful, 100psi easy and the gauge
> works well enough (it jumps).


Problem was mostly swapping between four different machines with wildly
different frame layouts. I banged my new back tyre (with new tube) up
to about 115 psi according to the Road Morph's gauge on Friday morning;
on applying the track pump today it said about 70! I don't think it'd
lose 45 psi in the space of 15 km riding and a long weekend of sitting
in the shed...

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
There ought to be a /La/ against it.