Free donuts!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by ET5057, Jul 7, 2007.

  1. ET5057

    ET5057 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, not really. But now that I have your attention...

    Hi guys I'm new here and I know absolutely nothing about cycling. I'm a teenager who runs cross-country and I have so many problems with my knees and lower legs that I can't run more than the required amount for school (tendenitis of the knees, oshgood slaughters to name a few - I believe it is all mostly growing related). This means I have decided to turn to cycling for my summer training.
    I have a stationary bike but as many of you may agree, it gets boring and my parents are willing to invest in cycling.

    So I think I want an aluminum compact bike. Could you guys give me some options that I have in terms of bikes and prices. And links with more info on these bikes would be great! Also, what is the price difference between aluminum and carbon fiber and hibrid?

    edit: I'm 5'2"

    thanks in advance...
     
    Tags:


  2. ET5057

    ET5057 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    bump...
    guys, I need some knowledge before I got to a store and some goon tells me to buy a junky bike.. it would be much apreciated
     
  3. BikingBrian

    BikingBrian New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2003
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    0
    I had some of the same problems as you when I was high school and doing track and x-country, which is how I got into cycling also.

    Anyway, I would say don't worry about what material the frame is made of, it makes very little difference. The most important thing is that it fits you, and that it is suitable for what you plan to do with it....do you just want to use it for cross-training? Get into bike racing at some point? Do long rides or centuries? This will partially determine what to look for in a bike, for example something with relaxed geometry (long rides, touring etc) or aggresive geometry (racing, esp criteriums), and what kind of handling the bike has.
    The first step would be to get fit at a reputable shop. Better shops have fitters and/or fit systems similar to a stationary cycle so you know what size range you should be looking at.
    As far as bike makers go, there's no easy answer, unfortunately (fortunately?). Mass-produced bikes (relatively speaking), like Trek, Giant, Cannondale, etc generally offer good value for money, and you can't really go wrong. In fact, since you are still in high school, one of those might be the best choice, as you don't know yet whether or not you will stick with cycling in the future. For most of the makers above, there is usually not too much difference between the mid-level and upper level bikes, except the parts spec. So you could buy a cheaper bike from them and still be getting a good frame to upgrade later if you wanted to. A good example is Cannondale, especially their alu frames....the only differences between the Optimo 1, 2, and 3 on their CAAD 9 and 8 series is the parts. Same thing with Giant. These frames may bot be terribly sexy like Colnago, Pinarello, etc, but they would probably serve you just fine.
     
  4. ET5057

    ET5057 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks that's helpful...
    yeah I am planning on just going for like a 45 min. to an hour ride on the road every morning in congruence with my core and upper body workout. Maybe racing but at the rate I'm growing that would be when I buy my second bike at least.
     
  5. ET5057

    ET5057 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    bump.......
     
  6. mskaufman84

    mskaufman84 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2007
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Frame material is really not that important.. its how its used. As many people will tell you.. make sure it feels good and you're comfortable on the bike to start.

    My advice about your knees (as i have a similar history as you)...

    When you get your bike, get a good profeessional fitting done. This is not what they do in the LBS. This is a professional who will at least take 1 to 1.5 hours analizing how you sit and ride on the bike. A badly fitted bike can hurt your knees just as much as running.
    Good luck!
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - donuts
  1. Hoya1500
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    890
  2. Time Cop
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    41,946
Loading...