Free road bike found in river.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Mason, Oct 19, 2003.

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  1. "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Isn't there some law whereby if it's beyond the tidal watermark it doesn't belong to anybody, or
    > something like that?
    >

    Perhaps you mean the law relating to wrecks:

    "Property found in the sea or on the seashore could be from a ship and is known technically as
    wreck. Wreck cannot be treasure because it will not have been buried with the intention to
    recover it.

    All wrecks must be reported to the Receiver of Wreck, whose address is:-

    Bay 1/05 Spring Place 105 Commercial Road Southampton Hampshire SO1 OZD Tel: 02380 329167 Website:
    http://www.mcga.gov.uk "

    It seems the Receiver of Wreck can either allow the finder to keep the wreck, or hold it themselves
    for up to a year while they try & trace the owner... I would bet good money they wouldn't be the
    least bit interested in your wreck!

    Rich
     


  2. <ouch> wrote in message news:p[email protected]...
    >> Fair enough. maybe that's what I would do too, I don't really know.
    > What would happen though if it was on a "wanted" list and they found it in Simon's possession?
    > Would he be charged with theft?

    I should imagine there would be a theoretical possibility of charges such as theft or handling
    stolen goods, were someone to have reported it stolen, and were the police to think that Simon
    either nicked it or knew or had reason to believe that it had been nicked. But I can't imagine that
    they would think that - Simon can easily account for how he came by it, and has the photos to prove
    it. I don't see any reason to believe it was a stolen bike just because it's in the mudflats. The
    damn thing has a square rear wheel and no front tyre - everything points to it having been abandoned
    as worthless, and Simon having performed a public service by removing a large unsightly piece of
    litter that would otherwise have taken a very long time to disintegrate! If it was me, I wouldn't
    give it a second thought. But if it was me, I wouldn't bother with it in the first place either ;-).

    Rich
     
  3. Ouch

    Ouch Guest

    >I should imagine there would be a theoretical possibility of charges such as theft or handling
    >stolen goods, were someone to have reported it stolen, and were the police to think that Simon
    >either nicked it or knew or had reason to believe that it had been nicked. But I can't imagine that
    >they would think that - Simon can easily account for how he came by it, and has the photos to prove
    >it. I don't see any reason to believe it was a stolen bike just because it's in the mudflats. The
    >damn thing has a square rear wheel and no front tyre - everything points to it having been
    >abandoned as worthless, and Simon having performed a public service by removing a large unsightly
    >piece of litter that would otherwise have taken a very long time to disintegrate! If it was me, I
    >wouldn't give it a second thought. But if it was me, I wouldn't bother with it in the first place
    >either ;-).
    >
    >Rich
    >

    You're right about it being a theoretical possibility. Very unlikely outcome indeed.

    Ah, the photos. I forgot about them. ;-)

    Only Simon can tell if it's worth restoring I suppose. I wouldn't restore it if it was a cheapo
    mountainbike, but that's because I already have a decent one. I'd probably give a road bike a
    go though.
     
  4. Davo

    Davo Guest

    Take it back abd throw it back

    1. Its Knackered
    2. Its not worth the time or trouble
    3.Its not yours
    4.The owner ore than likley threw it in there in the first place
    5.did you see ''Beadle'' anywhere

    [email protected]

    the bigger the ring the more it hurts


    "A.Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1g32ztf.1jyajou1w3895N%[email protected]...
    > Simon Mason <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Setting out for a 30 mile run yesterday, I headed for the Humber
    foreshore
    > > near the bridge and was somewhat startled to see a Raleigh Team Banana
    road
    > > bike dumped in the mud flats at low tide. After finding a plank of wood
    to
    > > walk on, I managed to drag it out of the river. I then hid it in some
    gorse
    > > bushes and returned to pick it up today.
    > >
    > > I know it's not exactly akin to finding King John's jewels in The Wash
    but
    > > there's not a lot wrong with it. Needs a front tyre, rear wheel and the crank sorting out. Gears
    > > and brakes seem OK.
    >
    > After you've spent on a tyre/wheel/sundry other bits, it would have been cheaper to go to your
    > local secondhand/junk shop, and get one in working order for £25. Looks like it was put in the
    > river for a reason - it wouldnt fit in a dustbin! Alan.
    >
    > --
    > Change the 'minus' to 'plus' to reply by mail. http://www.dvatc.co.uk off-road cycling in the
    > North Midlands.
     
  5. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Setting out for a 30 mile run yesterday, I headed for the Humber foreshore near the bridge and was
    > somewhat startled to see a Raleigh Team Banana road bike dumped in the mud flats at low tide.
    > After finding a plank of wood to walk on, I managed to drag it out of the river. I then hid it in
    > some gorse bushes and returned to pick it up today.
    >
    > I know it's not exactly akin to finding King John's jewels in The Wash but there's not a lot
    > wrong with it. Needs a front tyre, rear wheel and the crank sorting out. Gears and brakes
    > seem OK.

    Disassemble it and hose it down to wash all the salt water out urgently
    - it is fearsomely corrosive. Pay special attention to bearings.

    Also, check with the police that it hasn't been reported as stolen. Save any problems later.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    I'm fed up with Life 1.0. I never liked it much and now it's getting me down. I think I'll
    upgrade to MSLife 97 -- you know, the one that comes in a flash new box and within weeks you're
    crawling with bugs.
     
  6. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I would say that the front fork is bent, probably following a head-on with something solid.
    >
    > Being a steel bike that may be fixable, but check the top and downtubes
    for
    > wrinkles behind the headset lugs.

    The front wheel is dead perfect true, so it is unlikely to have been in a head on - I can't
    see anyone buying a new front wheel for bent forks. There is no paint damage to the forks
    either. Simon.
     
  7. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Simon Mason wrote:
    > >
    > > Isn't there some law whereby if it's beyond the tidal watermark it doesn't belong to anybody, or
    > > something like that?

    > Would you be happy with that excuse if it was your bike that had been
    found?

    If I hadn't waded out into all that cack -it would have been swept away by now and no-one would
    have had it, but I take your point. However, the bike is practically worthless in it's present
    state and even if the rightful owner (if indeed its owner wasn't the one who dumped it there) could
    be found I wonder if they'd bother taking it back.

    Simon
     
  8. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

  9. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "A.Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1g32ztf.1jyajou1w3895N%[email protected]...

    > After you've spent on a tyre/wheel/sundry other bits, it would have been cheaper to go to your
    > local secondhand/junk shop, and get one in working order for £25. Looks like it was put in the
    > river for a reason - it wouldnt fit in a dustbin! Alan.

    Indeed you are right, but then there's not the satisfaction of dragging the thing out of the river,
    cleaning it up and getting it into working order then riding it. It just something that appeals.

    Simon
     
  10. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 17:42:42 +0100, "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"A.Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:1g32ztf.1jyajou1w3895N%[email protected]...
    >
    >> After you've spent on a tyre/wheel/sundry other bits, it would have been cheaper to go to your
    >> local secondhand/junk shop, and get one in working order for £25. Looks like it was put in the
    >> river for a reason - it wouldnt fit in a dustbin! Alan.
    >
    > Indeed you are right, but then there's not the satisfaction of dragging the thing out of the
    > river, cleaning it up and getting it into working order then riding it. It just something that
    > appeals.

    Just as it does for me buying old crap from auctions and saving them death. Yesterday I picked up an
    old 25"[my size] Falcon road bike for £3 from the local auction that I'll get working and use as
    some kind of hack. Right now, I've got it stripped down to the frame ready for reassembly. It's
    needs a couple of wheels [which I have from other bikes] and the gears sorting out. When it's all
    done there's the satisfaction of cheap around-town transport.

    And maybe I need to get out more too.

    gb
     
  11. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 17:18:29 +0100, "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> I would say that the front fork is bent, probably following a head-on with something solid.
    >>
    >> Being a steel bike that may be fixable, but check the top and downtubes
    >for
    >> wrinkles behind the headset lugs.
    >
    > The front wheel is dead perfect true, so it is unlikely to have been in a head on - I can't see
    > anyone buying a new front wheel for bent forks.

    Plenty of people would do a bodge like that, even if it was just a temporary measure.

    > There is no paint damage to the forks either.

    There doesn't necessarily have to be.

    If you imagine a line going from the top of the headset down to the ground, the top half of your
    front folks should always lie on this line. Considering it's an old Raleigh, and not some kind of
    special experimental frame design or something, those forks are almost definitely damaged. It would
    affect your steering considerably.

    Garryb
     
  12. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    ouch <> writes:

    > >That's been my experience of lost property handed in. No doubt it is the legally correct thing
    > >to do. Still, it wouldn't surprise me if even the police told him to take it away, in the
    > >condition it's in. If they do hang on to it, it has to be 99.9% certain it won't be claimed, and
    > >it'll just rust up and seize up even more, while he's waiting to claim it back, now that it's
    > >out of the mud.
    > >
    > >I'd say be practical and realistic about this - let Simon do it up if he wants and restore it to
    > >some useful life. Albeit with the caveat that in the unlikely event that if it ever did happen to
    > >have been reported missing and rediscovered in Simon's possession, the original owner would be
    > >the legal owner and it would have to be returned - no doubt in a better state than when it was
    > >dumped.
    >
    > Fair enough. maybe that's what I would do too, I don't really know. What would happen though if it
    > was on a "wanted" list and they found it in Simon's possession? Would he be charged with theft?

    I don't think I'd take it to the police station; I think I'd phone them up, tell them I'd found
    it, and tell them the frame number, and make sure you know who you talked to and that they logged
    the call. Then if anyone has reported that frame number as stolen, you'll have to give it back,
    but if the police have no record at least you have 'done the right thing' and there can be no
    comeback later.

    And then I would get ahead and sort out the salt before serious corrosion set in.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    I'm fed up with Life 1.0. I never liked it much and now it's getting me down. I think I'll
    upgrade to MSLife 97 -- you know, the one that comes in a flash new box and within weeks you're
    crawling with bugs.
     
  13. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > ouch <> writes:

    >
    > And then I would get ahead and sort out the salt before serious corrosion set in.

    It was in a part of the river 35 miles from the sea and there's no salt in it there-maybe after
    wasting my money doing up an "ex-catalogue" bike, I'll wish it had been eaten away. Although to be
    fair, it's far superior a bike to the modern gas pipe 100 quid heavy clunkers around today - so not
    everything has improved, even at the low end . Simon
     
  14. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    <ouch> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >I should imagine there would be a theoretical possibility of charges such
    as
    > >theft or handling stolen goods, were someone to have reported it stolen,
    and
    > >were the police to think that Simon either nicked it or knew or had
    reason
    > >to believe that it had been nicked. But I can't imagine that they would think that - Simon can
    > >easily account for how he came by it, and has the photos to prove it. I don't see any reason to
    > >believe it was a stolen
    bike
    > >just because it's in the mudflats. The damn thing has a square rear
    wheel
    > >and no front tyre - everything points to it having been abandoned as worthless, and Simon having
    > >performed a public service by removing a
    large
    > >unsightly piece of litter that would otherwise have taken a very long
    time
    > >to disintegrate! If it was me, I wouldn't give it a second thought. But
    if
    > >it was me, I wouldn't bother with it in the first place either ;-).
    > >
    > >Rich
    > >
    >
    > You're right about it being a theoretical possibility. Very unlikely outcome indeed.
    >
    > Ah, the photos. I forgot about them. ;-)

    I have several photos of it buried in the mudflats at low tide and of course at home in its present
    condition. However, in the unlikely event that someone saw me riding it around and stopped me,
    claiming it was theirs, I would give them it back after taking off my new bits of course, but it's
    not very likely given it's only a cheapo thing anyway but it has decent enough gears (Sachs -Hurot)
    and brakes (Weinmann) to warrant doing up.

    By the way, in the 24 hours that it was lying in the bushes awaiting my return, someone whipped off
    the rear carrier it had leaving the brakes dangling free.

    Simon
     
  15. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    These kind of bikes are worth restoring if you canibalise two or three similar second-hand bikes for
    parts and build one reasonable one out of it, otherwise not worth it, IMO.

    ~PB
     
  16. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Simon Mason wrote:

    > The front wheel is dead perfect true, so it is unlikely to have been in a head on - I can't see
    > anyone buying a new front wheel for bent forks. There is no paint damage to the forks either.

    Unless it's why the bike's called the "Banana", those forks are well bent* and will give an
    "interesting" ride. I've bought bikes with bent forks and true wheels. An ignorant/desperate cyclist
    could easily have changed the wheel and continued with funny steering, or the original wheel could
    possibly have survived the impact. Forks from a similar type & size abandoned or second-hand bike
    might do fine.

    * I'll check by x-posting link to the pics to r.b.t

    ~PB
     
  17. M Series

    M Series Guest

    Simon Mason wrote:
    > "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> I would say that the front fork is bent, probably following a head-on with something solid.
    >>
    >> Being a steel bike that may be fixable, but check the top and downtubes for wrinkles behind the
    >> headset lugs.
    >
    > The front wheel is dead perfect true, so it is unlikely to have been in a head on - I can't
    > see anyone buying a new front wheel for bent forks. There is no paint damage to the forks
    > either. Simon.

    Notice that the rear wheel has a reflector, the front doesn't. Why remove one and not both ? OK it
    could still be in the Humber of course. I think the front wheel is not the original. Bike was in a
    crash, forks bent wheel knackered. Owner replaces wheel.
     
  18. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 17:18:29 +0100, "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> I would say that the front fork is bent, probably following a head-on with something solid.
    >>
    >> Being a steel bike that may be fixable, but check the top and downtubes
    >for
    >> wrinkles behind the headset lugs.
    >
    > The front wheel is dead perfect true, so it is unlikely to have been in a head on - I can't see
    > anyone buying a new front wheel for bent forks. There is no paint damage to the forks either.

    Notice too, how, little clearance there is between the rim and the frame. Try fitting a tyre on
    there, and then some mudguards [which I'm assuming the bike was designed for as it has the relevant
    screw eyelets]...and then see how near the frame the mudguards are!

    garryb
     
  19. The Mark

    The Mark Guest

    Simon Mason wrote:
    > Setting out for a 30 mile run yesterday, I headed for the Humber foreshore near the bridge and was
    > somewhat startled to see a Raleigh Team Banana road bike dumped in the mud flats at low tide.
    > After finding a plank of wood to walk on, I managed to drag it out of the river. I then hid it in
    > some gorse bushes and returned to pick it up today.
    >
    > I know it's not exactly akin to finding King John's jewels in The Wash but there's not a lot
    > wrong with it. Needs a front tyre, rear wheel and the crank sorting out. Gears and brakes
    > seem OK.
    >
    > http://www.simonmason.karoo.net/zbanana.htm
    >
    > Will post photos of it on the mud flats later.
    >
    > Simon

    When I was a kid a friend and me found a chopper and a mini moulton in a river they were in almost
    perfect condition apart from being wet. We decided to take them to the local police station but on
    our way there the owners mother stopped us and took them back. Later, thinking about the way she
    spoke to us, she must have thought that we had stolen them.
    --
    Mark
     
  20. "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Indeed you are right, but then there's not the satisfaction of dragging
    the
    > thing out of the river, cleaning it up and getting it into working order then riding it. It just
    > something that appeals.

    I guess similar to finding an old original cd of m$ windows 3.11 in a trashcan and getting it
    installed sucessfully on your pc ;-)
     
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