Freewheel problem?



J

John Hearns

Guest
My new reoad bike, the Claud Butler, has a problem. On
ascents and under stress, the chain slips.
(ie. the pedals run round for say 1/2 turn then catch
again). Seems like a problem freewheel to me.

Anyone know if this is a major job (read expensive) for a
bikeshop to fix? If I got a cassette remover, is it
something I might tweak in the mechanism, or is a
replacement on the cards? Have consulted Sheldon Brown, and
won't be upgrading to Nanodrive just yet.

Components are Simano Sora.
 
"John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]...
> My new reoad bike, the Claud Butler, has a problem. On
> ascents and under stress, the chain slips.
> (ie. the pedals run round for say 1/2 turn then catch
> again). Seems like a problem freewheel to me.
>
> Anyone know if this is a major job (read expensive) for a
> bikeshop to fix? If I got a cassette remover, is it
> something I might tweak in the mechanism, or is a
> replacement on the cards? Have consulted Sheldon Brown,
> and won't be upgrading to Nanodrive just yet.
>
> Components are Simano Sora.
>
Check the rear mech indexing, if OK sounds like time for a
new chain and cassette to me.

KC
 
On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 08:41:05 +0100, John Hearns <[email protected]>
wrote:

>My new reoad bike, the Claud Butler, has a problem. On
>ascents and under stress, the chain slips.

New bike or new to you?

If it's a new bike, just take it back.
--
"We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to
prevent life escaping from us." http://www.bensales.com
 
John Hearns wrote:

> My new reoad bike, the Claud Butler, has a problem.

How new? This sounds like a job for the LBS under
warranty to me.

> On ascents and under stress, the chain slips.
> (ie. the pedals run round for say 1/2 turn then catch
> again). Seems like a problem freewheel to me.

Prolly indexing. Unlikely to have shagged a chain and / or
cassette on a new bike, unless you've been giving it a
serious hammering.

> Anyone know if this is a major job (read expensive) for a
> bikeshop to fix?

On a new bike it's free ;-)

--
Guy
===
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
Washington University
 
On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 10:08:25 +0100, Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

> John Hearns wrote:
>
>> My new reoad bike, the Claud Butler, has a problem.
>
> How new? This sounds like a job for the LBS under
> warranty to me.

True, but this bike was delivered by courier. I shan't name
the shop - as I haven't even contacted them yet. I guess I
could post th wheel off to them if needed. Anyone actually
posted a rear wheel?

BTW, and this may be a stupid question, why would the
indexing make the chain or freewheel seem like it is
slipping?
 
John Hearns wrote:
> Reading further on Sheldon Brown's pages.
>
> The hub is marked FH-RM40 On the Shimano website, the
> exploded diagram has the frewheel body as part no. Y-3SL
> 98030. Clear as mud. Anyone know which one this would be
> on (say) Wiggle?

Sounds like the chain jumping on the sprockets rather that
the freehub ratchect gone. Does the problem occur in all
combinations of gears or just one specific pairing. A new
cassette and chain would obviously eliminate these
components but if it is simply the rear mech not adjusted
properly you will not need these just yet. Replacing the
chain well before it really needs it means you don't have to
replace the cassette as often, which is important if you use
old kit like I do.
 
On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 10:16:25 +0100, John Hearns <[email protected]>
wrote:

>BTW, and this may be a stupid question, why would the
>indexing make the chain or freewheel seem like it is
>slipping?

Because the chain wouldn't sit properly on the sprocket. It
would try and ride up or down and in trying to move between
sprockets it'll slip because it's not engaged on the teeth.

FWIW I don't think I've ever had a freehub slip in 15 years
and that's with putting them through some seriously high
muddy miles.
--
"We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to
prevent life escaping from us." http://www.bensales.com
 
On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 09:26:50 +0100, MSeries wrote:

>
> Sounds like the chain jumping on the sprockets rather that
> the freehub ratchect gone. Does the problem occur in all
> combinations of gears or just one specific pairing.
That's exactly what is does feel like. Not sure about the
gear combinations - but being the unfot bod I am I'm still
using low range gears on it, to help with spinning.
 
John Hearns wrote:

>> How new? This sounds like a job for the LBS under
>> warranty to me.

> True, but this bike was delivered by courier. I shan't
> name the shop - as I haven't even contacted them yet. I
> guess I could post th wheel off to them if needed. Anyone
> actually posted a rear wheel?

Call the shop and talk to them. And next time remember
that the extra few quid from the LBS can sometimes be
negotiated away ;-)

> BTW, and this may be a stupid question, why would the
> indexing make the chain or freewheel seem like it is
> slipping?

Chain rides up onto the teeth and then slips back is the
usual reason, I think.

Have you got a workstand? Sometimes getting the biek up on
the stand and watching it from behind while an assistant
turns the pedals will reveal the source of the problem.

--
Guy
===
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
Washington University
 
On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 10:24:10 +0100, Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

>
> Call the shop and talk to them. And next time remember
> that the extra few quid from the LBS can sometimes be
> negotiated away ;-)
It was an insurance replacement - and I'm all for the LBS.

> Have you got a workstand?
I do indeed - I have a natty gadget called an X-20 Bike
Stand. Says on it 'Made in England by Pery' Its an upright
tube about three feet high, on two detachable feet. The
chainstay and seatstay are put in hooks on the upright,
raising the rear wheel off the ground. I use it as a storage
stand also.

I got this in a strange shop in Oxford Street, London yonks
ago. It sold off all sorts of en-of-lien sports gear. I got
my Zamberlan hiking boots there too, dead cheap. Still fit
like a dream.
 
John Hearns wrote:
> On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 09:26:50 +0100, MSeries wrote:
>
>>
>> Sounds like the chain jumping on the sprockets rather
>> that the freehub ratchect gone. Does the problem occur in
>> all combinations of gears or just one specific pairing.
> That's exactly what is does feel like. Not sure about the
> gear combinations - but being the unfot bod I am I'm still
> using low range gears on it, to help with spinning.

My bet would be a imperfectly adjusted derailleur which is
starting to change to the next gear (up or down) under load.
Try to determine if it jumps up (my bet) or down, then use
the cable adjuster at the back to move the derailleur the
opposite way (i.e. if if jumps up make the derailleur move
down by a tiny amount. Repeat a few times until the problem
goes away. Check that the hanger (where the derailleur is
attached to the frame) is not bent, it should be true
vertical, adjusting the mech peropely will be much harder if
this is bent.
 
Me again. Sorry if I'm getting boring.

Quick tweaking session of the rear gear cable over
lunchtime, though I haven't ridden the bike yet.

I notice that the smallest cog is firmly fixed, yet the
larger 7 seem to float up and down the splines of the
freehub. Is this correct? Doesn't seem so to me, but I admit
that it may be some feature in the latest Shimano kit?
 
> I notice that the smallest cog is firmly fixed, yet
> the larger 7 seem to float up and down the splines of
> the freehub. Is this correct? Doesn't seem so to me,
> but I admit that it may be some feature in the latest
> Shimano kit?

This is absolutely not meant to happen. Take the bike into a
shop ASAP and get it fixed.

Simon
 
John Hearns wrote:

> I notice that the smallest cog is firmly fixed, yet
> the larger 7 seem to float up and down the splines of
> the freehub. Is this correct? Doesn't seem so to me,
> but I admit that it may be some feature in the latest
> Shimano kit?

Wot Simon said: that is not how it should be. Hie you
to your friendly neighbourhood bikemonger and have
repairs effected.

--
Guy
===
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
Washington University
 
On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 14:35:56 +0100, Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

> Wot Simon said: that is not how it should be. Hie you to
> your friendly neighbourhood bikemonger and have repairs
> effected.

Wilco. Will visit Whitcomb in Deptford (*), Harry Perry or
maybe Evans. There might be a spacer missing between the
first two cogs.

(*) Whitcomb did a smashing job on welding my Orange (water
bottle boss had been damaged and ripped out), plus replacing
entire drivechain. then it got nicked. Sniff...
 
> There might be a spacer missing between the first
> two cogs.

Just out of interest, where did you buy the bike?

Simon
 
On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 14:46:21 +0100, Simonb wrote:

>> There might be a spacer missing between the first
>> two cogs.
>
> Just out of interest, where did you buy the bike?

As I said, its not fair to name the shop as they haven't had
a chance to fix it.
 
In article <[email protected]>,
BenS <[email protected]> wrote:

> If it's a new bike, just take it back.

Sounds like the best advice - however - in case it is
something simple like a stiff like turn the pedals backwards
and watch the chain on the cassette (smallest cog) if it is
a stiff link you will see it easily.

--
A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global
Village http://www.millport.net
 
Thanks to Wharf cycles http://www.wharfcycles.co.uk who
deserve a plug for fitting a new spacer to my cassette this
evening for a very modest price.

Punctured on the way home, but the karma was made up to me
as I stopped in an East End park and loads of local kids
came up to look at the thin tyres on my 'racing bike'. They
were jumping over a bit of plywood they had found,
accompanied by a young lady on a scooter and a disabled
young lad on a trike. Magic. I think he was chuffed when I
siad I liked his bike.
 
Tooo mainy spilling mestaykes you lot. Don'te you evere check youre
postinges?
"John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]...
> On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 10:24:10 +0100, Just zis Guy, you
> know? wrote:
>
> >
> > Call the shop and talk to them. And next time remember
> > that the extra
few
> > quid from the LBS can sometimes be negotiated away ;-)
> It was an insurance replacement - and I'm all for the LBS.
>
>
> > Have you got a workstand?
> I do indeed - I have a natty gadget called an X-20 Bike
> Stand. Says on it 'Made in England by Pery' Its an upright
> tube about three feet high, on two detachable feet. The
> chainstay and seatstay are put in hooks on the upright,
> raising the rear wheel off the ground. I use it as a
> storage stand also.
>
> I got this in a strange shop in Oxford Street, London
> yonks ago. It sold off all sorts of en-of-lien sports
> gear. I got my Zamberlan hiking boots there too, dead
> cheap. Still fit like a dream.
 

Similar threads

B
Replies
15
Views
930
Cycling Equipment
Qui si parla Campagnolo
Q
N
Replies
3
Views
481
UK and Europe
naked_draughtsman
N
Q
Replies
0
Views
389
Cycling Equipment
Qui si parla Campagnolo
Q
R
Replies
22
Views
3K
P