Freezer thingummies

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Paul Rooney, Nov 5, 2003.

  1. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    What are they called? They are pads, filled with some sort of gel, that you can freeze and then bung
    in your picnic or whatever. I intend to use them for icing my calves and any other place they might
    be useful. And where can you get them (in England)?

    Thanks.

    --
    Paul My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003): http://paulrooney.netfirms.com

    Please sponsor me for the London Marathon at: http://www.justgiving.com/london2004
     
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  2. Apusapus

    Apusapus Guest

    "Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > What are they called? They are pads, filled with some sort of gel, that you can freeze and then
    > bung in your picnic or whatever. I intend to use them for icing my calves and any other place they
    > might be useful. And where can you get them (in England)?

    They're called 'frozen peas' and you can buy then at any food store that has a working freezer.

    Roger.
     
  3. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Wed, 5 Nov 2003 12:51:52 -0000, "apusapus" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> What are they called? They are pads, filled with some sort of gel, that you can freeze and then
    >> bung in your picnic or whatever. I intend to use them for icing my calves and any other place
    >> they might be useful. And where can you get them (in England)?
    >
    >They're called 'frozen peas' and you can buy then at any food store that has a working freezer.
    >

    I'm a bit reluctant to use peas because I reckon they'd get a bit nasty after several weeks use
    and re-use.

    --
    Paul My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003): http://paulrooney.netfirms.com

    Please sponsor me for the London Marathon at: http://www.justgiving.com/london2004
     
  4. Apusapus

    Apusapus Guest

    "Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...

    > I'm a bit reluctant to use peas because I reckon they'd get a bit nasty after several weeks use
    > and re-use.

    As long as you don't intend to serve them up with the Sunday roast they'll last for ages.

    OTOH, if you're married to a particularly unpleasant soul they make an ideal vegetable accompaniment
    to her evening meal.

    Roger.
     
  5. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    "Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What are they called? They are pads, filled with some sort of gel, that you can freeze and then
    > bung in your picnic or whatever. I intend to use them for icing my calves and any other place they
    > might be useful.

    I hope this doesn't mean that you've knackered your legs already with this forefoot striking
    business. ;-)

    Seriously, take care if you're determined to make a quick change to your running technique. I'm
    inclined to believe that a change in foot strike should come as a consequence of other subtle
    changes to your running form, not as a prime objective.

    Cheers.

    Tim
     
  6. Jonpeace

    Jonpeace Guest

    >What are they called?

    Mines just called ICE-PAK, but rather than use that, ahve you ever tried bags of frozen veggies? I
    use peas, but any would work. They conform nicely to the shape of the body part you're icing, plus
    you get the bonus of REALLY strange looks when you tell people "Well, I pead my foot for 30
    minutes today"!

    Jon Peace
     
  7. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Wed, 5 Nov 2003 17:26:59 -0000, "Tim Downie" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> What are they called? They are pads, filled with some sort of gel, that you can freeze and then
    >> bung in your picnic or whatever. I intend to use them for icing my calves and any other place
    >> they might be useful.
    >
    >I hope this doesn't mean that you've knackered your legs already with this forefoot striking
    >business. ;-)
    >
    >Seriously, take care if you're determined to make a quick change to your running technique. I'm
    >inclined to believe that a change in foot strike should come as a consequence of other subtle
    >changes to your running form, not as a prime objective.
    >
    >Cheers.
    >
    >Tim
    >

    Thanks, all. I've found some in Boots. No - I damaged my calves a few weeks back, and they are not
    entirely healed. I'm still getting some soreness, so I thought I'd try icing them. I'm pretty well
    convinced that the change would lead to a smoother running style, but I'll take on board everyone's
    advice insofar as that's possible!

    --
    Paul My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003): http://paulrooney.netfirms.com

    Please sponsor me for the London Marathon at: http://www.justgiving.com/london2004
     
  8. Chris Russon

    Chris Russon Guest

    They are really good - I bought mine from Boots. No idea what they are called though!

    My only warning is to be careful about using them in bed - I was using one on a hamstring injury,
    fell asleep on it, and it burst overnight. Not the first time I've woken up to discover a mess on
    the sheets, but definitely the first time it was blue ;-)

    "Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What are they called? They are pads, filled with some sort of gel, that you can freeze and then
    > bung in your picnic or whatever. I intend to use them for icing my calves and any other place they
    > might be useful. And where can you get them (in England)?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > --
    > Paul My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003): http://paulrooney.netfirms.com
    >
    > Please sponsor me for the London Marathon at: http://www.justgiving.com/london2004
     
  9. Or you can put 4 parts water and 1 part ETOH in a zip-lock bag and freeze that. Same thing minus the
    pretty blue food coloring.

    Christine

    On Wed, 5 Nov 2003 23:17:08 -0000, "Chris Russon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >They are really good - I bought mine from Boots. No idea what they are called though!
    >
    >My only warning is to be careful about using them in bed - I was using one on a hamstring injury,
    >fell asleep on it, and it burst overnight. Not the first time I've woken up to discover a mess on
    >the sheets, but definitely the first time it was blue ;-)
    >
    >
    >"Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> What are they called? They are pads, filled with some sort of gel, that you can freeze and then
    >> bung in your picnic or whatever. I intend to use them for icing my calves and any other place
    >> they might be useful. And where can you get them (in England)?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Paul My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003): http://paulrooney.netfirms.com
    >>
    >> Please sponsor me for the London Marathon at: http://www.justgiving.com/london2004
     
  10. "apusapus" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:eek:[email protected]...
    >
    > > I'm a bit reluctant to use peas because I reckon they'd get a bit nasty after several weeks use
    > > and re-use.
    >
    > As long as you don't intend to serve them up with the Sunday roast they'll last for ages.
    >
    > OTOH, if you're married to a particularly unpleasant soul they make an ideal vegetable
    > accompaniment to her evening meal.
    >
    Is that what you mum did to you?
     
  11. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    On 5 Nov 2003 18:31:17 -0800, [email protected] (Matthew Mazerowski) wrote:

    >"apusapus" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >OTOH, if you're married to a particularly unpleasant soul they make an ideal
    >> vegetable accompaniment to her evening meal.
    >>
    >Is that what you mum did to you?

    Roidger/Frasier married his mommy? No wonder he's such a basket case.
     
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