freezing roux

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Jp Fournier, Jun 12, 2004.

  1. Jp Fournier

    Jp Fournier Guest

    Hey Folks,

    I wonder if anyone has any details on the freezing of roux.
    My Gisslen textbook suggests that freezing flour will cause
    it to breakdown somewhat and loose some of it's thickening
    power. Does anyone have any experience as to how much roux
    is affected by freezing?

    Any thoughts appreciated.

    jp
     
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  2. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-06-12, JP Fournier <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Any thoughts appreciated.

    I don't understand the point of freezing roux. How much time
    difference can realized between reheating frozen roux and
    preparing fresh roux?

    nb
     
  3. Bob

    Bob Guest

    JP Fournier wrote:

    > Hey Folks,
    >
    > I wonder if anyone has any details on the freezing of
    > roux. My Gisslen textbook suggests that freezing flour
    > will cause it to breakdown somewhat and loose

    lose

    > some of it's

    its

    > thickening power. Does anyone have any experience as to
    > how much roux is affected by freezing?
    >
    > Any thoughts appreciated.

    Many restaurants keep a pot of roux near the stove. Takes
    forever to go off. It should keep just fine at room temp for
    weeks. Even more weeks in the fridge.

    Pastorio
     
  4. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 15:09:45 GMT, notbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 2004-06-12, JP Fournier <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Any thoughts appreciated.
    >
    >I don't understand the point of freezing roux. How much
    >time difference can realized between reheating frozen roux
    >and preparing fresh roux?

    A proper roux does take a bit of time and attention to make
    properly. I make about 2 cups at a time and keep it in a
    jar in the fridge. Long shelf life and it doesn't seem to
    break down any.

    -sw
     
  5. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-06-12, Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > A proper roux does take a bit of time and attention to
    > make properly.

    Hmmmm... I didn't think about a cajun/creole roux. That may
    be a time saver. A basic french roux (white) only takes a
    couple minutes.

    nb
     
  6. R. Weisbloom

    R. Weisbloom Guest

    In the hotel we used to make up a big batch at a time and use the left over
    as a Beurre Marie. Which is the same, but cold.
    Rob
    "JP Fournier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Hey Folks,
    >
    > I wonder if anyone has any details on the freezing of
    > roux. My Gisslen textbook suggests that freezing flour
    > will cause it to breakdown somewhat and loose some of it's
    > thickening power. Does anyone have any experience as to
    > how much roux is affected by freezing?
    >
    > Any thoughts appreciated.
    >
    > jp
     
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