Freezing Yorkshire Puddings



D

Daisy

Guest
I have successfully made Yorkshire Pudding for many years, but this
year the family want a Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding Christmas
Dinner. There will be 12 of us altogether and I only have one oven -
it's a European one and not very big. I can manage a 4-5lb roast of
beef ok, but don't want it to rest the 45 minutes the puddings will
take.

Has anyone made these in muffin pans (similar to popovers) and then
frozen and reheated them? If so, I would really like to know if
there is anything I should do in the freezing and reheating process.

I found a recipe that said frozen Yorkshire puddings can be reheated
from frozen in 15-20 minutes. But there was no review of the
recipe.

Thanks all, and Merry Christmas.


Daisy

Carthage demands an explanation for this insolence!
 
N

Noises Off

Guest
Daisy wrote:

> I have successfully made Yorkshire Pudding for many years, but this
> year the family want a Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding Christmas
> Dinner. There will be 12 of us altogether and I only have one oven -
> it's a European one and not very big. I can manage a 4-5lb roast of
> beef ok, but don't want it to rest the 45 minutes the puddings will
> take.
>
> Has anyone made these in muffin pans (similar to popovers) and then
> frozen and reheated them? If so, I would really like to know if
> there is anything I should do in the freezing and reheating process.
>
> I found a recipe that said frozen Yorkshire puddings can be reheated
> from frozen in 15-20 minutes. But there was no review of the
> recipe.


In the UK you can buy frozen Yorkshire Puddings (the small
individual ones not the whole meat pan type). They seem sell
well so I guess they are OK. When I make Yorkshire Puddings
I cook them for 20 min. or less at 230C. What temperature
are you using for them to take 45 Min?

Whenever a cookery program does them, searing heat is
stressed. Last night Gordon Ramsey did not even remove the
pre-heated pan from the oven to pour in the mixture! Just
opened the door and reached in with the bowl.

Noises Off
 
K

Kathy in NZ

Guest
On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 14:59:22 +1300, Daisy <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I have successfully made Yorkshire Pudding for many years, but this
>year the family want a Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding Christmas
>Dinner. There will be 12 of us altogether and I only have one oven -
>it's a European one and not very big. I can manage a 4-5lb roast of
>beef ok, but don't want it to rest the 45 minutes the puddings will
>take.
>
>Has anyone made these in muffin pans (similar to popovers) and then
>frozen and reheated them? If so, I would really like to know if
>there is anything I should do in the freezing and reheating process.
>
>I found a recipe that said frozen Yorkshire puddings can be reheated
>from frozen in 15-20 minutes. But there was no review of the
>recipe.
>
>Thanks all, and Merry Christmas.
>
>
>Daisy
>
>Carthage demands an explanation for this insolence!


Daisy I have made, frozen and reheated Yorkshire puddings made in
muffin tins. They are good. I thawed them in advance. That may not be
necessary, but I didn't try. The key is to reheat them back to crisp
on the outside stage. I think I'd tend to thaw them first, so the
inside stays moist.

I just put the cooked puddings in a plastic bag in the freezer, then
to reheat them (from thawed) I put them on an oven tray at a fairly
high temperature till hot. They go a bit flatter when cooled and don't
rise like they did the first time, but taste fine.

Kathy in NZ
 
P

Pandora

Guest
"Noises Off" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel
messaggio news:[email protected]
> Daisy wrote:
>
>> I have successfully made Yorkshire Pudding for many years, but this
>> year the family want a Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding Christmas
>> Dinner. There will be 12 of us altogether and I only have one oven -
>> it's a European one and not very big. I can manage a 4-5lb roast of
>> beef ok, but don't want it to rest the 45 minutes the puddings will
>> take.
>>
>> Has anyone made these in muffin pans (similar to popovers) and then
>> frozen and reheated them? If so, I would really like to know if
>> there is anything I should do in the freezing and reheating process.
>>
>> I found a recipe that said frozen Yorkshire puddings can be reheated
>> from frozen in 15-20 minutes. But there was no review of the
>> recipe.

>
> In the UK you can buy frozen Yorkshire Puddings (the small individual ones
> not the whole meat pan type). They seem sell well so I guess they are OK.
> When I make Yorkshire Puddings I cook them for 20 min. or less at 230C.
> What temperature are you using for them to take 45 Min?
>
> Whenever a cookery program does them, searing heat is stressed. Last night
> Gordon Ramsey did not even remove the pre-heated pan from the oven to pour
> in the mixture! Just opened the door and reached in with the bowl.
>
> Noises Off


I think it is more simple to reheat roastbeef, rather then yorks.
If you want to freeze YP you must do it freezing dough, but not when they
are ready.
BTW when I made YP this summer with Ophelia's recipe they were ready in
about 30 minutes, or less...
Pandora
>
 
D

Daisy

Guest
On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 03:02:27 +0000, Noises Off
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Daisy wrote:
>
>> I have successfully made Yorkshire Pudding for many years, but this
>> year the family want a Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding Christmas
>> Dinner. There will be 12 of us altogether and I only have one oven -
>> it's a European one and not very big. I can manage a 4-5lb roast of
>> beef ok, but don't want it to rest the 45 minutes the puddings will
>> take.
>>
>> Has anyone made these in muffin pans (similar to popovers) and then
>> frozen and reheated them? If so, I would really like to know if
>> there is anything I should do in the freezing and reheating process.
>>
>> I found a recipe that said frozen Yorkshire puddings can be reheated
>> from frozen in 15-20 minutes. But there was no review of the
>> recipe.

>
>In the UK you can buy frozen Yorkshire Puddings (the small
>individual ones not the whole meat pan type). They seem sell
>well so I guess they are OK. When I make Yorkshire Puddings
>I cook them for 20 min. or less at 230C. What temperature
>are you using for them to take 45 Min?


Oh I use about 210 to 220 for a large pudding that takes 40-45 mins.
But I would use about 220 for 20 mins for smaller (large muffin size)
puddings.
>
>Whenever a cookery program does them, searing heat is
>stressed. Last night Gordon Ramsey did not even remove the
>pre-heated pan from the oven to pour in the mixture! Just
>opened the door and reached in with the bowl.
>
>Noises Off


Oh yes I guess Gordon Ramsey would do that. I would be terribly
afraid of burning myself. I think you have to be fairly quick though.
My mother (from whom I learned to make these puddings) always had the
mixture at hand - and had one of us standing by to open and shut the
oven when the smoking hot enamel dish came out of the oven and she
plopped the batter in very quickly and someone opened the oven very
quickly - an in it went! She was Northern English and knew ALL about
Yorkshire puddings believe me!

I can remember her being very fussy about the mixture. It had to be
beaten (whisked - and there were no electric beaters in those days)
until little bubbles formed at the top. Then the mixture had to rest
- she liked at least an hour - and then whisked again until bubbles
appeared.

Thanks for your help. Merry Christmas and all the best for 2006.


Daisy

Carthage demands an explanation for this insolence!
 
D

Daisy

Guest
On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 06:58:16 GMT, [email protected] (Kathy in NZ) wrote:

>On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 14:59:22 +1300, Daisy <[email protected]>
>wrote:
>
>>I have successfully made Yorkshire Pudding for many years, but this
>>year the family want a Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding Christmas
>>Dinner. There will be 12 of us altogether and I only have one oven -
>>it's a European one and not very big. I can manage a 4-5lb roast of
>>beef ok, but don't want it to rest the 45 minutes the puddings will
>>take.
>>
>>Has anyone made these in muffin pans (similar to popovers) and then
>>frozen and reheated them? If so, I would really like to know if
>>there is anything I should do in the freezing and reheating process.
>>
>>I found a recipe that said frozen Yorkshire puddings can be reheated
>>from frozen in 15-20 minutes. But there was no review of the
>>recipe.
>>
>>Thanks all, and Merry Christmas.
>>
>>
>>Daisy
>>
>>Carthage demands an explanation for this insolence!

>
>Daisy I have made, frozen and reheated Yorkshire puddings made in
>muffin tins. They are good. I thawed them in advance. That may not be
>necessary, but I didn't try. The key is to reheat them back to crisp
>on the outside stage. I think I'd tend to thaw them first, so the
>inside stays moist.
>
>I just put the cooked puddings in a plastic bag in the freezer, then
>to reheat them (from thawed) I put them on an oven tray at a fairly
>high temperature till hot. They go a bit flatter when cooled and don't
>rise like they did the first time, but taste fine.
>
>Kathy in NZ


Thanks for all of that. I am in NZ as well (fancy that!). I have
just taken a batch of 6 from the oven and they look just fine. I have
another 5 that I cooked earlier and cooled and then froze separately -
so as to get free flow. I will put them in a plastic bag and then
freeze the new ones in the same way and they can join the others
tomorrow.

I am so pleased to learn that these little puddings will reheat. I
will thaw them out before I reheat them. One recipe on the Net gave
10-15 mins from frozen - what timing do you think from the thawed
state? And what heat? I will have taken the roast beef (which is a
2.3kg scotch fillet in the piece) from the oven at about 190-200C -
would that be okay for another (say) 10-12 mins for the puddings do
you think?

I like to rest my meat for at least 15 minutes before carving. We are
having roast vegetables (and some greens like peas and broccoli) and
the roast vegies will have been cooked earlier and can be reheated in
the m/w and then crisped off - perhaps when the puddings go in?

This Christmas Dinner doesn't have to be "perfect", but because it's
the biggest I've ever been involved in, I certainly don't want soggy
Yorkshire puddings. You understand .....

Cheers and Merry Christmas


Daisy

Carthage demands an explanation for this insolence!
 
C

Christine Dabney

Guest
On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 21:04:06 +1300, Daisy <[email protected]>
wrote:

>My mother (from whom I learned to make these puddings) always had the
>mixture at hand - and had one of us standing by to open and shut the
>oven when the smoking hot enamel dish came out of the oven and she
>plopped the batter in very quickly and someone opened the oven very
>quickly - an in it went!


I was thinking about making this this year...is it safe to make
Yorkshire pudding in a Le Crueset pot/pan? I am thinking about
getting the fat all hot before adding the batter..and wondering how
that will do.

I have several Le Crueset pans that would work for this..if it is safe
enough for the pan.

Christine
 
W

Wayne Boatwright

Guest
On Sat 17 Dec 2005 01:20:27a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Christine
Dabney?

> On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 21:04:06 +1300, Daisy <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
>>My mother (from whom I learned to make these puddings) always had the
>>mixture at hand - and had one of us standing by to open and shut the
>>oven when the smoking hot enamel dish came out of the oven and she
>>plopped the batter in very quickly and someone opened the oven very
>>quickly - an in it went!

>
> I was thinking about making this this year...is it safe to make
> Yorkshire pudding in a Le Crueset pot/pan? I am thinking about
> getting the fat all hot before adding the batter..and wondering how
> that will do.
>
> I have several Le Crueset pans that would work for this..if it is safe
> enough for the pan.


There shouldn't be a problem, Christine. I've never done it with Yorkshire
pudding, but I routinely use a Le Crueset enamelled skillet in a similar
manner to bake cornbread.

I preheat at 425 degrees, the skillet with the fat in it until it just
begins to smoke, then quickly pour the batter in and pop it back into the
oven. The batter sizzles when it hits the skillet. I've been doing this
for years with no ill effect.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
_____________________________________________

A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
 
C

Christine Dabney

Guest
On 17 Dec 2005 09:34:19 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
<[email protected]> wrote:

>There shouldn't be a problem, Christine. I've never done it with Yorkshire
>pudding, but I routinely use a Le Crueset enamelled skillet in a similar
>manner to bake cornbread.
>
>I preheat at 425 degrees, the skillet with the fat in it until it just
>begins to smoke, then quickly pour the batter in and pop it back into the
>oven. The batter sizzles when it hits the skillet. I've been doing this
>for years with no ill effect.
>
>--


Thanks Wayne. I might try this afterall.

Christine
 
O

Ophelia

Guest
"Noises Off" <[email protected]> wrote in
message >
> In the UK you can buy frozen Yorkshire Puddings (the small individual
> ones not the whole meat pan type). They seem sell well so I guess they
> are OK. When I make Yorkshire Puddings I cook them for 20 min. or less
> at 230C. What temperature are you using for them to take 45 Min?
>
> Whenever a cookery program does them, searing heat is stressed. Last
> night Gordon Ramsey did not even remove the pre-heated pan from the
> oven to pour in the mixture! Just opened the door and reached in with
> the bowl.


Yes I make mine like that too. I don't take the tin out of the oven'

I have seen Yorkshire pudding for sale in shops but I have never bought
them. Making them from scratch is part of my heritage:)))))

O a Yorkshire woman:)
 
O

Ophelia

Guest
"Daisy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> I can remember her being very fussy about the mixture. It had to be
> beaten (whisked - and there were no electric beaters in those days)
> until little bubbles formed at the top. Then the mixture had to rest
> - she liked at least an hour - and then whisked again until bubbles
> appeared.


Yep... she knew what she was doing:))

>
> Thanks for your help. Merry Christmas and all the best for 2006.


Merry Christmas too you too:)
 
S

Syssi

Guest
"Daisy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I have successfully made Yorkshire Pudding for many years, but this
> year the family want a Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding Christmas
> Dinner. There will be 12 of us altogether and I only have one oven -
> it's a European one and not very big. I can manage a 4-5lb roast of
> beef ok, but don't want it to rest the 45 minutes the puddings will
> take.
>
> Has anyone made these in muffin pans (similar to popovers) and then
> frozen and reheated them? If so, I would really like to know if
> there is anything I should do in the freezing and reheating process.
>
> I found a recipe that said frozen Yorkshire puddings can be reheated
> from frozen in 15-20 minutes. But there was no review of the
> recipe.
>
> Thanks all, and Merry Christmas.
>
>
> Daisy
>
>===============


I've never froze mine but I have made them in both muffin tins and glass
ramekins. Both work wonderfully! If you used ramekins you could surround
the roast by them and cook at the same time... That's how I'd do it.


--
Syssi
 
K

Kathy in NZ

Guest
On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 21:16:10 +1300, Daisy <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Thanks for all of that. I am in NZ as well (fancy that!). I have
>just taken a batch of 6 from the oven and they look just fine. I have
>another 5 that I cooked earlier and cooled and then froze separately -
>so as to get free flow. I will put them in a plastic bag and then
>freeze the new ones in the same way and they can join the others
>tomorrow.
>
>I am so pleased to learn that these little puddings will reheat. I
>will thaw them out before I reheat them. One recipe on the Net gave
>10-15 mins from frozen - what timing do you think from the thawed
>state? And what heat? I will have taken the roast beef (which is a
>2.3kg scotch fillet in the piece) from the oven at about 190-200C -
>would that be okay for another (say) 10-12 mins for the puddings do
>you think?


That sounds about right to me, 10-12 minutes at 190-200C. Just keep an
eye on them that they don't get too brown, but they should be fine. I
always make my YP in advance, usually earlier on the day, and reheat
them while the meat is resting. Sometimes I freeze leftovers if
there's only two of us for the meal.
>
>I like to rest my meat for at least 15 minutes before carving. We are
>having roast vegetables (and some greens like peas and broccoli) and
>the roast vegies will have been cooked earlier and can be reheated in
>the m/w and then crisped off - perhaps when the puddings go in?
>
>This Christmas Dinner doesn't have to be "perfect", but because it's
>the biggest I've ever been involved in, I certainly don't want soggy
>Yorkshire puddings. You understand .....
>
>Cheers and Merry Christmas
>
>
>Daisy
>
>Carthage demands an explanation for this insolence!
 
G

Goomba38

Guest
Kathy in NZ wrote:
.. Sometimes I freeze leftovers if
> there's only two of us for the meal.


Leftover YPs!?!? Is there really such a thing?! LOL
 
D

Don Gray

Guest
In message "Syssi" wrote:

> "Daisy" wrote in message
>
> > I have successfully made Yorkshire Pudding for many years, but this year
> > the family want a Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding Christmas Dinner.
> > There will be 12 of us altogether and I only have one oven - it's a
> > European one and not very big. I can manage a 4-5lb roast of beef ok,
> > but don't want it to rest the 45 minutes the puddings will take.
> >
> > Has anyone made these in muffin pans (similar to popovers) and then
> > frozen and reheated them? If so, I would really like to know if there
> > is anything I should do in the freezing and reheating process.
> >
> > I found a recipe that said frozen Yorkshire puddings can be reheated from
> > frozen in 15-20 minutes. But there was no review of the recipe.
> >
> > Thanks all, and Merry Christmas.
> >
> > Daisy

>
> I've never froze mine but I have made them in both muffin tins and glass
> ramekins. Both work wonderfully! If you used ramekins you could surround
> the roast by them and cook at the same time... That's how I'd do it.
>

Sorry, but got to disagree with this. Yorkshire puds really do need high
heat, both to get the fat to burning point before pouring in the batter and
to lift them up high once the oven door is closed. Putting them in the oven
alongside a roasting joint really defeats the objective. The temperature
would be far too low.

They also can be frozen (a sacreligious process!) for after re-heating in the
oven they come out far too crunchy. A good pud IMHO should be well risen,
crunchy on the outside, but still retain a softer inner layer.

Don, a Yorky born and bred.
 
S

sf

Guest
On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 00:49:11 GMT, Don Gray <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Sorry, but got to disagree with this. Yorkshire puds really do need high
>heat, both to get the fat to burning point before pouring in the batter and
>to lift them up high once the oven door is closed. Putting them in the oven
>alongside a roasting joint really defeats the objective. The temperature
>would be far too low.
>

I agree, high temp is mandatory. If you need to, heat the bottom of
your pan on the stove before pouring in the batter. In fact, given
the time crunch Syssi is in, stovetop preheating would be a good idea
because she doesn't have time to preheat her tins in the oven. Like a
souffle, yorkshire pudding needs a boost of heat from the bottom to
rise properly.

>They also can be frozen (a sacreligious process!) for after re-heating in the
>oven they come out far too crunchy. A good pud IMHO should be well risen,
>crunchy on the outside, but still retain a softer inner layer.
>
>Don, a Yorky born and bred.


Don, I need to ask you about those muffin sized puddings. Sure they
**** up, but do they flatten as much as those made in a skillet?

yorkshire pudding:
http://www.uknet.net/showcase/BritishFood/aaa.sized.jpg
The individuals look more like popovers to me:
http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/countries/uk/yorkshire-pudding.htm

popover:
http://food.oregonstate.edu/images/baked_products/popovers/popover6.jpg

When I try to make individuals, they turn out between popovers and
what the picture of individual yorkies looks like... so I am
reverting back to a big one for xmas dinner.