French Silk Chocolate Pie Rules

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Anne Bourget, Mar 14, 2004.

  1. Anne Bourget

    Anne Bourget Guest

    Someone asked for a recipe for French Silk Pie. This pie is
    ubiquitous but seldom the real thing. It has gone the way of
    Key Lime Pie I fear. I made this pie often as a youngster in
    the late 1950s. The recipe was from one of my mother's
    Pillsbury Bake-Off annual pamphlets. I do not have the
    pamphlet, however, I have a copy of Pillsbury's Best 1000
    Recipes (Barb Schaller also has a copy of this wonderful
    book.) The book is a consolidation of the annual booklets
    from 1949-1959.

    French Silk Chocolate Pie was a Best of Class Winner by Mrs.
    K. E. Cooper of Silver Springs, Maryland. I do not know in
    what year she won. But here is the recipe:

    "A magnificent chocolate pie--rich, creamy smooth and
    luscious, and you don't cook the filling."

    Bake at 450 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes Makes 8-inch pie

    Prepare recipe for One-Crust Pastry, using 8-inch pie pan;
    bake as directed

    Cream 1.2 cup butter or margarine [editoral comment
    here...this was the 1950s. Do not use margarine if you make
    this pie. It must be real butter] Gradually add 3/4 cup
    sugar, creaming well

    Blend in 2 squares (2 oz.) unsweetened chocolate, melted and
    thoroughly cooled, and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    Add 2 eggs, one at a time; beat 5 minutes after each. (With
    mixer use medium speed.)

    Turn into pie shell. Chill 2 hours. Top with whipped cream
    and walnuts if desired.

    The photograph in the book shows the pie with a rim of
    whipped cream and whole walnuts placed about 3 inches apart
    so that each piece of cut pie gets one walnut.

    It is important to make your own pastry dough. Do not buy a
    ready made shell unless you are absolutely afraid to tackle
    pie dough...and I know that there are many who are terrified
    of the thought of such an undertaking.

    I will also confess to altering the recipe over the years. I
    add a third square (oz.) of chocolate because I prefer a
    more chocolate pie. I also add mint extract to the filling
    when I add the vanilla. I frost the entire top of the pie
    with whipped cream and decorate the top with chocolate
    curls. And I happily skip the walnuts.

    Now I wonder if Mrs. Cooper is still alive and if she
    realizes that her recipe has become such a famous American
    dessert standard?
     
    Tags:


  2. Misnomer

    Misnomer Guest

    I got a little confused by the 1.2 cups of butter, so looked
    for the recipe at pillsbury. (maybe my newsreader changed
    the font or something)

    http://www.pillsbury.com/recipesearch/showRecipe.asp?re-
    cipeID=469

    It looks like it won 1000$ prize in 1951 and has a rating of
    almost 5 stars!

    This newsgroup is so much fun! This is definatly a "maker"
    right after Martha's chocolate and ginger cookies.

    take care Liz

    Hey! Look what [email protected] (Anne Bourget) wrote :

    >Someone asked for a recipe for French Silk Pie. This pie is
    >ubiquitous but seldom the real thing. It has gone the way
    >of Key Lime Pie I fear. I made this pie often as a
    >youngster in the late 1950s. The recipe was from one of my
    >mother's Pillsbury Bake-Off annual pamphlets. I do not have
    >the pamphlet, however, I have a copy of Pillsbury's Best
    >1000 Recipes (Barb Schaller also has a copy of this
    >wonderful book.) The book is a consolidation of the annual
    >booklets from 1949-1959.
     
  3. Ypauls

    Ypauls Guest

    After reading the post I downloaded the recipe & bought all
    the ingredients per the instructions.

    Problem: Unfortunately it appears to have a granular look
    (it does not taste granular). I am positive I whipped it
    long enough (it really looked good until I added the last 2
    oz. of egg). Any idea as to why I got the granular look? I
    will make it again, but would like to avoid whatever the
    problem was. Cordially ypauls

    "MisNomer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I got a little confused by the 1.2 cups of butter, so
    > looked for the
    recipe at
    > pillsbury. (maybe my newsreader changed the font or
    > something)
    >
    > http://www.pillsbury.com/recipesearch/showRecipe.asp?reci-
    > peID=469
    >
    > It looks like it won 1000$ prize in 1951 and has a rating
    > of almost 5
    stars!
    >
    > This newsgroup is so much fun! This is definatly a "maker"
    > right after
    Martha's
    > chocolate and ginger cookies.
    >
    > take care Liz
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Hey! Look what [email protected] (Anne Bourget) wrote :
    >
    > >Someone asked for a recipe for French Silk Pie. This pie
    > >is ubiquitous but seldom the real thing. It has gone the
    > >way of Key Lime Pie I fear. I made this pie often as a
    > >youngster in the late 1950s. The recipe was from one of
    > >my mother's Pillsbury Bake-Off annual pamphlets. I do not
    > >have the pamphlet, however, I have a copy of Pillsbury's
    > >Best 1000 Recipes (Barb Schaller also has a copy of this
    > >wonderful book.) The book is a consolidation of the
    > >annual booklets from 1949-1959.
     
  4. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-03-17, ypauls <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Unfortunately it appears to have a granular look (it does
    > not taste granular). I am positive I whipped it long
    > enough (it really looked good until I added the last 2 oz.
    > of egg).

    You may have added the eggs while the chocolate was still
    too warm and the eggs broke (scrambled). This would explain
    the grainy look without the grainy feel. OTOH, it may have
    been the pasturized egg/fake egg product thing. Try it with
    a couple real eggs.

    nb
     
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