Frequent flat tire on a bike trainer.



Y

Yum

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I have been riding only on a bike trainer for about a month. To my
surprize, I had to repair flat tire three times already in a month. I have
been riding only about 10minutes a day. The same symptom. A very tiny
hole and very slow leak. It takes about 24 - 48 hours to become complete
flat. It is a magnetic trainer and the roller looks very smooth. I have
used the tire for whole summer and didn't have any flats on the wheel until
I started to ride the bike on a trainer. What might have caused the flat ?
Is this a common problem ? Thanks.
 
"Yum" <[email protected]> wrote:
>I have been riding only on a bike trainer for about a month. To my
>surprize, I had to repair flat tire three times already in a month. I have
>been riding only about 10minutes a day. The same symptom. A very tiny
>hole and very slow leak. It takes about 24 - 48 hours to become complete
>flat. It is a magnetic trainer and the roller looks very smooth. I have
>used the tire for whole summer and didn't have any flats on the wheel until
>I started to ride the bike on a trainer. What might have caused the flat ?


A bit of glass or a thorn adhering to your tire that was driven in by the constant pressure of the trainer would do the trick.

>Is this a common problem ?


No.
 
"Yum" <[email protected]> wrote:
>I have been riding only on a bike trainer for about a month. To my
>surprize, I had to repair flat tire three times already in a month. I have
>been riding only about 10minutes a day. The same symptom. A very tiny
>hole and very slow leak. It takes about 24 - 48 hours to become complete
>flat. It is a magnetic trainer and the roller looks very smooth. I have
>used the tire for whole summer and didn't have any flats on the wheel until
>I started to ride the bike on a trainer. What might have caused the flat ?


A bit of glass or a thorn adhering to your tire that was driven in by the constant pressure of the trainer would do the trick.

>Is this a common problem ?


No.
 
Yum who? writes:

> I have been riding only on a bike trainer for about a month. To my
> surprise, I had to repair flat tire three times already in a month.
> I have been riding only about 10minutes a day. The same symptom. A
> very tiny hole and very slow leak. It takes about 24 - 48 hours to
> become complete flat. It is a magnetic trainer and the roller looks
> very smooth. I have used the tire for whole summer and didn't have
> any flats on the wheel until I started to ride the bike on a
> trainer. What might have caused the flat?


A thorn or "Michelin wire" that is still in the tire casing and
protrudes just enough to penetrate if the tube massaged long enough.
A trainer puts a greater strain on the tire and tube than a flat road.
It is much like riding over a continuous cattle guard.

> Is this a common problem ?


Yes. Many riders are loath to run their thumb around inside the
casing to locate barely visible penetrators.

http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.1.html

Jobst Brandt
[email protected]
 
On Thu, 4 Nov 2004 20:29:57 -0800, "Yum" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I have been riding only on a bike trainer for about a month. To my
>surprize, I had to repair flat tire three times already in a month.


Were all of the holes in the same area of the tube, or were they
spread around?

> I have
>been riding only about 10minutes a day. The same symptom. A very tiny
>hole and very slow leak. It takes about 24 - 48 hours to become complete
>flat. It is a magnetic trainer and the roller looks very smooth. I have
>used the tire for whole summer and didn't have any flats on the wheel until
>I started to ride the bike on a trainer. What might have caused the flat ?
>Is this a common problem ? Thanks.


In addition to the observations of the other posters, I'll guess that
it could be a very small piece of loose sharp debris inside the tire;
the additional flexing that the tire gets on a trainer (as compared to
riding on the street) might be enough to work it into the tube, while
it would otherwise just sit unnoticed. I'd double-check for both
embedded and loose potential puncture producers inside the tire.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
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I'll look into see if I can find any small object in a tire, next time I
need to repair flat. The location of holes are spread around. Thank you
all for good suggestions.
 
Yum who? writes:

> I'll look into see if I can find any small object in a tire, next
> time I need to repair flat. The location of holes are spread
> around.


All around what? If you don't align the tire (label) with the stem
hole in the rim, then you will of course have punctures at random
locations even if it is caused by the same sharp object.

> Thank you all for good suggestions.


Please let us know what you find. It helps those who make suggestions
when they find the appropriateness of their perception of a problem.

Jobst Brandt
[email protected]
 
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Yum who? writes:
>
> > I'll look into see if I can find any small object in a tire, next
> > time I need to repair flat. The location of holes are spread
> > around.

>
> All around what? If you don't align the tire (label) with the stem
> hole in the rim, then you will of course have punctures at random
> locations even if it is caused by the same sharp object.


Good point. I didn't think about that. It was different location of a
tube, but might have
been the same place of a tire. I'll never know.

>
> > Thank you all for good suggestions.

>
> Please let us know what you find. It helps those who make suggestions
> when they find the appropriateness of their perception of a problem.
>


Yes, I'll. Thanks again.
 
"Yum" <[email protected]> writes:

> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> Yum who? writes:
>>
>> > I'll look into see if I can find any small object in a tire, next
>> > time I need to repair flat. The location of holes are spread
>> > around.

>>
>> All around what? If you don't align the tire (label) with the stem
>> hole in the rim, then you will of course have punctures at random
>> locations even if it is caused by the same sharp object.

>
> Good point. I didn't think about that. It was different location of a
> tube, but might have
> been the same place of a tire. I'll never know.


No offense, Yum, but I'm surprised when helping people fix a flat that
they don't always do this, that is, align the tire to the rim. It's
an easy thing to do and can give useful information about weird
punctures.

It's too bad that the tube companies don't get a clue and imprint an
arrow/label on tubes so that we can consistently orient them. I usually
try to keep the tire/tube together until I've located the flat,
however, that isn't always practical. Of course, because there are
only two orientations, this isn't quite so pressing.


Joe
 
"Joe Riel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Yum" <[email protected]> writes:
>
> > <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> >> Yum who? writes:
> >>
> >> > I'll look into see if I can find any small object in a tire, next
> >> > time I need to repair flat. The location of holes are spread
> >> > around.
> >>
> >> All around what? If you don't align the tire (label) with the stem
> >> hole in the rim, then you will of course have punctures at random
> >> locations even if it is caused by the same sharp object.

> >
> > Good point. I didn't think about that. It was different location of

a
> > tube, but might have
> > been the same place of a tire. I'll never know.

>
> No offense, Yum, but I'm surprised when helping people fix a flat that
> they don't always do this, that is, align the tire to the rim. It's
> an easy thing to do and can give useful information about weird
> punctures.
>
> It's too bad that the tube companies don't get a clue and imprint an
> arrow/label on tubes so that we can consistently orient them. I usually
> try to keep the tire/tube together until I've located the flat,
> however, that isn't always practical. Of course, because there are
> only two orientations, this isn't quite so pressing.
>
>
> Joe


I decided to examine the tire without waiting for another flat.
It turned out two of my patches were at exactly symmetric location from a
stem.
Then, I tried to find any object in tire at inside wall and rim, but
couldn't find.
However, finally, I found a tiny piece of glass, half burried on a outside
wall, at the
exact location of last patch. Thanks a lot.
 
In article <[email protected]>,
"Yum" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I have been riding only on a bike trainer for about a month. To my
>surprize, I had to repair flat tire three times already in a month. I have
>been riding only about 10minutes a day. The same symptom. A very tiny
>hole and very slow leak. It takes about 24 - 48 hours to become complete
>flat. It is a magnetic trainer and the roller looks very smooth. I have
>used the tire for whole summer and didn't have any flats on the wheel until
>I started to ride the bike on a trainer. What might have caused the flat ?
>Is this a common problem ? Thanks.


I got that a lot, and tried sticking a strip of used innertube
between the tube and tire. Seems to have worked--no more flats on the
trainer, and fewer on the road too. Rather ungangly mess when a patch
is needed, though. I have been tempted to just glue it onto the tube,
but haven't yet, fearing that might cause more trouble than it avoids.
I also try to keep the air pressure in the tire high and use the
lightest pressure possible to keep the roller engaged.

--
B.B. --I am not a goat! thegoat4 at airmail.net
http://www.sorryeverybody.com/
 
Yum ? writes:

> I decided to examine the tire without waiting for another flat. It
> turned out two of my patches were at exactly symmetric location from
> a stem. Then, I tried to find any object in tire at inside wall and
> rim, but couldn't find. However, finally, I found a tiny piece of
> glass, half buried on a outside wall, at the exact location of last
> patch.


Good work.

> Thanks a lot.


Next time put your reply under the original heading so it can be found
more easily in connection with that thread. I know one could look for
articles by you but normally such responses are expected at the end of
the thread that started the exchange. It's not a rule, just a
convenience.

Thanks for the report.

Jobst Brandt
[email protected]
 
On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 16:47:34 GMT, Joe Riel <[email protected]> wrote:

>No offense, Yum, but I'm surprised when helping people fix a flat that
>they don't always do this, that is, align the tire to the rim. It's
>an easy thing to do and can give useful information about weird
>punctures.
>
>It's too bad that the tube companies don't get a clue and imprint an
>arrow/label on tubes so that we can consistently orient them. I usually
>try to keep the tire/tube together until I've located the flat,
>however, that isn't always practical. Of course, because there are
>only two orientations, this isn't quite so pressing.


My custom, when I'm thinking about it, has been to place the *pressure
rating* adjacent to the valve stem. Somehow, that seems to make more
sense than any other marker.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
[email protected] writes:

> Next time put your reply under the original heading so it can be found
> more easily in connection with that thread. I know one could look for
> articles by you but normally such responses are expected at the end of
> the thread that started the exchange. It's not a rule, just a
> convenience.


I'm surprised tin didn't thread it properly, isn't that what you use?
Gnus had no problem following the thread despite the change in subject
name.


Joe
 
Joe Riel writes:

>> Next time put your reply under the original heading so it can be
>> found more easily in connection with that thread. I know one could
>> look for articles by you but normally such responses are expected
>> at the end of the thread that started the exchange. It's not a
>> rule, just a convenience.


> I'm surprised tin didn't thread it properly, isn't that what you
> use? Gnus had no problem following the thread despite the change in
> subject name.


If the name is changed, on what does it sort. It certainly cannot
look at the meaning of the title. TIN lists the threads by title and
when a change in the title string occurs, it becomes a new thread...
which it should.

Jobst Brandt
[email protected]
 
On Sun, 07 Nov 2004 23:57:33 GMT, [email protected]
wrote:

>Joe Riel writes:
>
>>> Next time put your reply under the original heading so it can be
>>> found more easily in connection with that thread. I know one could
>>> look for articles by you but normally such responses are expected
>>> at the end of the thread that started the exchange. It's not a
>>> rule, just a convenience.

>
>> I'm surprised tin didn't thread it properly, isn't that what you
>> use? Gnus had no problem following the thread despite the change in
>> subject name.

>
>If the name is changed, on what does it sort. It certainly cannot
>look at the meaning of the title. TIN lists the threads by title and
>when a change in the title string occurs, it becomes a new thread...
>which it should.


tin preserved the header that would have permitted thread connection
across subject change boundaries;

References: <[email protected]>
<[email protected]>
<[email protected]>
<[email protected]> <[email protected]>
<[email protected]>
<[email protected]> <[email protected]>

It's been a long time since I last used it and I don't know if they
ever made thread construction by use of References an option. The
last tin FAQ that I have still states, in response to the question,
"Why do some people say that tin doesn't support threading?":
"Because not everyone defines threading in the same way. Those who
assert tin doesn't thread consider threading to be building up a tree
data structure out of references lines and message-ids, allowing one
to deal with followups by subthread in logical response order and
irrespective of subject changes. What tin calls threading is actually
what some other newsreaders call subject/date sorting. A future
release of tin will support reference threading." Maybe that release
exists; I don't know.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> It's been a long time since I last used it and I don't know if they
> ever made thread construction by use of References an option. The
> last tin FAQ that I have still states, in response to the question,
> "Why do some people say that tin doesn't support threading?":
> "Because not everyone defines threading in the same way. Those who
> assert tin doesn't thread consider threading to be building up a tree
> data structure out of references lines and message-ids, allowing one
> to deal with followups by subthread in logical response order and
> irrespective of subject changes. What tin calls threading is actually
> what some other newsreaders call subject/date sorting. A future
> release of tin will support reference threading." Maybe that release
> exists; I don't know.


Yes, tin now lets the user thread by subject, references, or both.
I don't know which version number was the first to support this feature.
In my current version, 1.7.6, threading is controlled by the "Thread articles
by" config option. If your tin version supports it, you can turn on
threading by reference (and then, by subject) by adding lines like this
to your tinrc:

# Thread articles on 0=(nothing) 1=(Subject) 2=(References) 3=(Both)
# 4=(Multipart Subject).
thread_articles=3

Otherwise, tin retains the clean and efficient interface it has had for
years.

--
Todd Bryan
Santa Barbara, CA
bryan at cs dot utk dot edu
 
"Werehatrack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 16:47:34 GMT, Joe Riel <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >No offense, Yum, but I'm surprised when helping people fix a flat that
> >they don't always do this, that is, align the tire to the rim. It's
> >an easy thing to do and can give useful information about weird
> >punctures.
> >
> >It's too bad that the tube companies don't get a clue and imprint an
> >arrow/label on tubes so that we can consistently orient them. I usually
> >try to keep the tire/tube together until I've located the flat,
> >however, that isn't always practical. Of course, because there are
> >only two orientations, this isn't quite so pressing.

>
> My custom, when I'm thinking about it, has been to place the *pressure
> rating* adjacent to the valve stem. Somehow, that seems to make more
> sense than any other marker.
> --

I like the idea. It really makes sense. We have four bicycles with
different tires.
I always have hard time finding the tire pressure rating, especially in a
garage.
 
<[email protected]> wrote:
>Joe Riel writes:
>>I'm surprised tin didn't thread it properly, isn't that what you
>>use? Gnus had no problem following the thread despite the change in
>>subject name.

>If the name is changed, on what does it sort.


The References: header, which contains the Message-IDs of previous
articles in the thread. This is threading; what you have is
group-by-subject. Changing the Subject line is perfectly acceptable (and
sensible when the topic itself has changed).

It's unfortunate that Google's interface [1], even though it does parse
References:, presents a change of subject as if it were a new thread; but I
don't see why we should change correct behaviour to accomodate broken
newsreading software.

[1] I know you use tin, not Google, I'm speaking more generally.
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!