fried clams

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by John D. Misrahi, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. Anyone have a good recipe? What should I coat them in? Egg and milk? Then bread crumbs? or
    flour? cornmeal?

    john
     
    Tags:


  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    John D. Misrahi wrote:
    > Anyone have a good recipe? What should I coat them in? Egg and milk? Then bread crumbs? or flour?
    > cornmeal?
    >
    > john

    I'd dip them in an egg wash (beaten egg and water or milk) and then roll them in seasoned flour.
    Cornmeal doesn't sound good (to me) for fried clams.

    Jill
     
  3. Mr. Wizard

    Mr. Wizard Guest

    "John D. Misrahi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone have a good recipe? What should I coat them in? Egg and milk? Then bread crumbs? or flour?
    > cornmeal?
    >
    > john
    >
    Be REALLY careful not to over cook them when frying. The result is fried tire tread.
     
  4. Puester

    Puester Guest

    "John D. Misrahi" wrote:
    >
    > Anyone have a good recipe? What should I coat them in? Egg and milk? Then bread crumbs? or flour?
    > cornmeal?
    >
    > john

    Peter Hunt's Cape Cod Cookbook says:

    Shuck and dry clams. Dip in beaten egg and roll in fine, dry crumbs. Fry in deep hot fat till golden
    brown. Drain on brown paper or paper towels. Serve with quartered lemon or catsup. (I suggest tartar
    sauce or cocktail sauce instead!)

    Clsam fritters

    1 c sifted flour 1 tsp. baking powder 1 quart chopped clams 1 beaten egg fat or oil for frying

    Mix flour and baking powder. Mix in egg and clams. Drop tablespoonsful into hot fat in a deep
    skillet, fry till brown.

    Fanny Farmer Boston Cooking School Cookbook says:

    Dip clams in seasoned flour or fritter batter, fry in deep fat heated to 375deg.

    Fritter batter: Sift together: 1 cup flour 1 tsp. baking powder
    1/4 tsp. salt

    Beat till fluffy: 2 eggs

    Add:
    2/3 cup milk 1 tsp. oil dash of lemon juice

    Mix with flour only enough to dampen; add clams and fry by tablespoonsful.

    gloria p
     
  5. Bob

    Bob Guest

    John D. Misrahi wrote:

    > Anyone have a good recipe? What should I coat them in? Egg and milk? Then bread crumbs? or flour?
    > cornmeal?

    Rule for coating foods to be fried is: If it's wet, dry it; if it's dry, wet it.

    Clams are wet. Dredge them in seasoned flour, egg wash, crumbs or flour. All stages of coating
    should be seasoned lightly. Can't go wrong with Old Bay or similar.

    But you have to have the right sorts of clams. Big ones will be exceedingly tough. Tiny ones will be
    coated more heavily than you're likely to like.

    The procedure I use is to toss the clams in a bag with seasoned flour and drop the coated pieces
    into a large-hole sieve to get the excess flour off. Drop a few into seasoned egg wash and scoop up
    with a slotted spoon. Drop into final flour coat. Scoop up with hands, shake off excess flour and
    drop into hot oil (about 350F) for a short time, depending on size. No more than about 2 minutes.
    Serve with lemon wedges and/or some sharp cocktail sauce or tartar sauce.

    Also good piled into a real-bread roll with shred lettuce and tartar sauce.

    Pastorio
     
  6. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > John D. Misrahi wrote:
    > > Anyone have a good recipe? What should I coat them in? Egg and milk? Then bread crumbs? or
    > > flour? cornmeal?
    > >
    > > john
    >
    > I'd dip them in an egg wash (beaten egg and water or milk) and then roll them in seasoned flour.
    > Cornmeal doesn't sound good (to me) for fried clams.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >

    Spiced cracker crumbs... :-d

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  7. Loki

    Loki Guest

    il Mon, 16 Feb 2004 16:17:39 -0500, "Bob (this one)" ha scritto:

    >
    > Rule for coating foods to be fried is: If it's wet, dry it; if it's dry, wet it.
    >
    > Clams are wet. Dredge them in seasoned flour, egg wash, crumbs or flour. All stages of coating
    > should be seasoned lightly. Can't go wrong with Old Bay or similar.
    >
    > But you have to have the right sorts of clams. Big ones will be exceedingly tough. Tiny ones will
    > be coated more heavily than you're likely to like.
    >
    > The procedure I use is to toss the clams in a bag with seasoned flour and drop the coated pieces
    > into a large-hole sieve to get the excess flour off. Drop a few into seasoned egg wash and scoop
    > up with a slotted spoon. Drop into final flour coat. Scoop up with hands, shake off excess flour
    > and drop into hot oil (about 350F) for a short time, depending on size. No more than about 2
    > minutes. Serve with lemon wedges and/or some sharp cocktail sauce or tartar sauce.
    >
    > Also good piled into a real-bread roll with shred lettuce and tartar sauce.
    >
    > Pastorio

    What is the ratio of water to egg in an eggwash? I've never heard of it before. Is it suitable for
    zucchini flowers? I'm looking for a light batter coating. One that doesn't pickup too much oil when
    cooking. It'll have to be homemade batter, I'm unlikely to have US products down here.

    --
    Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
     
  8. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Loki wrote:

    > il Mon, 16 Feb 2004 16:17:39 -0500, "Bob (this one)" ha scritto:
    >
    >
    >>Rule for coating foods to be fried is: If it's wet, dry it; if it's dry, wet it.
    >>
    >>Clams are wet. Dredge them in seasoned flour, egg wash, crumbs or flour. All stages of coating
    >>should be seasoned lightly. Can't go wrong with Old Bay or similar.
    >>
    >>But you have to have the right sorts of clams. Big ones will be exceedingly tough. Tiny ones will
    >>be coated more heavily than you're likely to like.
    >>
    >>The procedure I use is to toss the clams in a bag with seasoned flour and drop the coated pieces
    >>into a large-hole sieve to get the excess flour off. Drop a few into seasoned egg wash and scoop
    >>up with a slotted spoon. Drop into final flour coat. Scoop up with hands, shake off excess flour
    >>and drop into hot oil (about 350F) for a short time, depending on size. No more than about 2
    >>minutes. Serve with lemon wedges and/or some sharp cocktail sauce or tartar sauce.
    >>
    >>Also good piled into a real-bread roll with shred lettuce and tartar sauce.
    >>
    >>Pastorio
    >
    > What is the ratio of water to egg in an eggwash? I've never heard of it before.

    An eggwash can be any of several different things starting with just whipped eggs. Beyond that, dry
    seasonings and/or other liquids (water, milk, wine, cream, orange juice concentrate or whatever) can
    be added. The purpose is to moisten the surface and add a bit of sticking power to it. Helps to hold
    on the dry stuff. It's *not* a batter.

    > Is it suitable for zucchini flowers? I'm looking for a light batter coating. One that doesn't
    > pickup too much oil when cooking. It'll have to be homemade batter, I'm unlikely to have US
    > products down here.

    Here's an article I wrote a few years ago about just that.
    <http://www.epicurus.com/features/members/food/rose.html>

    Pastorio
     
  9. Loki

    Loki Guest

    il Mon, 16 Feb 2004 23:38:20 -0500, "Bob (this one)" ha scritto:

    > Loki wrote:
    >
    > > il Mon, 16 Feb 2004 16:17:39 -0500, "Bob (this one)" ha scritto:

    > An eggwash can be any of several different things starting with just whipped eggs. Beyond that,
    > dry seasonings and/or other liquids (water, milk, wine, cream, orange juice concentrate or
    > whatever) can be added. The purpose is to moisten the surface and add a bit of sticking power to
    > it. Helps to hold on the dry stuff. It's *not* a batter.

    I kinda knew that ;-) It was just my mind leaping to a related topic...
    >
    > > Is it suitable for zucchini flowers? I'm looking for a
    > > light batter coating. One that doesn't pickup too much oil when cooking. It'll have to be
    > > homemade batter, I'm unlikely to have US products down here.
    >
    > Here's an article I wrote a few years ago about just that.
    > <http://www.epicurus.com/features/members/food/rose.html>
    >
    > Pastorio

    Hmmm, dunno about all that beer... Doesn't seem very italian to me. I had been meaning to use
    tempura batter but have never got around to it. Deep fryiing always seems greasier when I do it,
    rather than when I get to scoff someone else's efforts. :)

    --
    Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
     
Loading...