Frog Legs

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mary, Jan 31, 2004.

  1. Mary

    Mary Guest

    While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since living
    there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not have
    much flavor or meat.

    Tom
     
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  2. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 03:08:40 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since living
    >there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    >domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not have
    >much flavor or meat.

    I should know, shouldn't I? :) Around here (SE Virginia) WalMart occasionally has them in the fish
    dept. I noticed that CajunGrocer.com mentioned "imported." They're pretty pricey. Taste like
    chicken. :)
     
  3. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Frogleg wrote:
    > On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 03:08:40 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    >> living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    >> domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not
    >> have much flavor or meat.
    >
    > I should know, shouldn't I? :) Around here (SE Virginia) WalMart occasionally has them in the
    > fish dept. I noticed that CajunGrocer.com mentioned "imported." They're pretty pricey. Taste like
    > chicken. :)

    As with many things, older (older than me!) folks will talk about just catching bull frogs and pan-
    frying the legs.

    I had a particularly tasty lunch at Owen Brennan's (in Memphis, not the New Orleans one) at which I
    had a great bowl of turtle soup. When I mentioned this to my 79 year old father, he told me his
    uncle used to catch plain ol' snapping turtles at the creek by their Pennsylvania home and use those
    to make wonderful soup.

    Found this recipe on a site that sells turtle meat for quite a lot per/lb. http://www.crawfish.cc/

    Turtle Soup

    1-1/2lbs turtle meat 2 qts beef stock 2 tsp Tabasco 1 large onion, chopped coarsely 2 ribs celery,
    chopped coarsely
    1/4 can tomato puree Put above ingredients into a 4uart stock pot and bring to a boil. Lower heat
    to simmer, and cook for 1 hour. Remove meat and de-bone, cut meat in half inch pieces and
    return to pot.

    Then add: 2 bay leaves 2 tsp mace 1-1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
    2/3 cup sherry

    Let cook for another hour.

    Then add:

    2 hard cooked egg whites chopped
    3/2 cup parsley

    Serve and enjoy!

    Jill
     
  4. Frogleg wrote:
    > On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 03:08:40 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    >>living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    >>domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not have
    >>much flavor or meat.
    >
    >
    > I should know, shouldn't I? :) Around here (SE Virginia) WalMart occasionally has them in the
    > fish dept. I noticed that CajunGrocer.com mentioned "imported." They're pretty pricey. Taste like
    > chicken. :)

    You are a Cannibal!!! What would Kermit The Frog think of you.
     
  5. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Margaret Suran wrote:
    > Frogleg wrote:
    >> On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 03:08:40 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    >>> living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    >>> domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not
    >>> have much flavor or meat.
    >>
    >>
    >> I should know, shouldn't I? :) Around here (SE Virginia) WalMart occasionally has them in the
    >> fish dept. I noticed that CajunGrocer.com mentioned "imported." They're pretty pricey. Taste like
    >> chicken. :)
    >
    >
    > You are a Cannibal!!! What would Kermit The Frog think of you.

    Now now, Margaret! No thinking about that kitten in the frog costume :)

    Jill
     
  6. Peter Lucas

    Peter Lucas Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in news:v6OSb.2994$tl5.1808
    @bignews1.bellsouth.net:

    > Margaret Suran wrote:
    >> Frogleg wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 03:08:40 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    >>>> living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    >>>> domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not
    >>>> have much flavor or meat.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I should know, shouldn't I? :) Around here (SE Virginia) WalMart occasionally has them in the
    >>> fish dept. I noticed that CajunGrocer.com mentioned "imported." They're pretty pricey. Taste
    >>> like chicken. :)
    >>
    >>
    >> You are a Cannibal!!! What would Kermit The Frog think of you.
    >
    > Now now, Margaret! No thinking about that kitten in the frog costume
    :)
    >

    Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, Kermit legs, Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm :)

    http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/fish/frog/loiseau.htm

    http://tinyurl.com/2kar9

    http://tinyurl.com/yqt75

    Enjoy :)

    --
    Peter Lucas There is a thin line between insanity Brisbane and all other forms of life. Australia I
    am slowly removing this line because I feel that everyone would be better off crazy.
     
  7. > While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always
    buy
    > frog legs. Since living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would
    > frogs be raised domestically for that purpose, or
    are
    > the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not have much flavor
    or
    > meat.

    Frog legs are raised on farms (well, I think they actually raise whole frogs). The farm-raised ones
    are probably tastier and more tender than most of the ones caught wild.

    The meat does taste like chicken, but I think it's juicier and sweeter.

    Your question recalled a cartoon I saw years ago which showed a man about to enter a restaurant. He
    notices a procession of frogs coming around the building from the rear, where the kitchen must be,
    all of them legless, and moving on little crutches.
     
  8. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Frogleg wrote:
    > > On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 03:08:40 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    > >> living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    > >> domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not
    > >> have much flavor or meat.
    > >
    > > I should know, shouldn't I? :) Around here (SE Virginia) WalMart occasionally has them in the
    > > fish dept. I noticed that CajunGrocer.com mentioned "imported." They're pretty pricey. Taste
    > > like chicken. :)
    >
    > As with many things, older (older than me!) folks will talk about just catching bull frogs and pan-
    > frying the legs.
    >
    > I had a particularly tasty lunch at Owen Brennan's (in Memphis, not the New Orleans one) at which
    > I had a great bowl of turtle soup. When I mentioned this to my 79 year old father, he told me his
    > uncle used to catch plain ol' snapping turtles at the creek by their Pennsylvania home and use
    > those to make wonderful soup.
    >
    > Found this recipe on a site that sells turtle meat for quite a lot per/lb. http://www.crawfish.cc/
    >
    > Turtle Soup
    >
    > 1-1/2lbs turtle meat 2 qts beef stock 2 tsp Tabasco 1 large onion, chopped coarsely 2 ribs celery,
    > chopped coarsely
    > 1/4 can tomato puree Put above ingredients into a 4uart stock pot and bring to a boil. Lower heat
    > to simmer, and cook for 1 hour. Remove meat and de-bone, cut meat in half inch pieces and return
    > to pot.
    >
    > Then add: 2 bay leaves 2 tsp mace 1-1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
    > 1/3 cup sherry
    >
    > Let cook for another hour.
    >
    > Then add:
    >
    > 2 hard cooked egg whites chopped
    > 1/2 cup parsley
    >
    > Serve and enjoy!
    >
    >
    > Jill

    Heve never used Mace... What does it taste like?

    The above sounds like a tasty thing to do with cooked crawfish tails. <G>

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  9. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Jonathan Sachs wrote:
    >> While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    >> living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    >> domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not
    >> have much flavor or meat.
    >
    > Frog legs are raised on farms (well, I think they actually raise whole frogs). The farm-raised
    > ones are probably tastier and more tender than most of the ones caught wild.
    >
    > The meat does taste like chicken, but I think it's juicier and sweeter.
    >
    > Your question recalled a cartoon I saw years ago which showed a man about to enter a restaurant.
    > He notices a procession of frogs coming around the building from the rear, where the kitchen must
    > be, all of them legless, and moving on little crutches.

    Must have been a Gary Larsen/Far Side cartoon... I always get a chuckle just thinking about the
    "Boneless Chicken Ranch" :)
     
  10. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Katra wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, "jmcquown"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Frogleg wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 03:08:40 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs.
    >> Then add: 2 bay leaves 2 tsp mace Jill
    >
    >
    > Heve never used Mace... What does it taste like?
    >
    It's a bit like anise seed, slightly liquorice-like.

    > The above sounds like a tasty thing to do with cooked crawfish tails.
    > <G>
    >
    > K.
    >
    >
    >> ,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
    >>
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  11. jmcquown wrote:
    > Jonathan Sachs wrote:
    >
    >>>While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    >>>living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    >>>domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not
    >>>have much flavor or meat.
    >>
    >>Frog legs are raised on farms (well, I think they actually raise whole frogs). The farm-raised
    >>ones are probably tastier and more tender than most of the ones caught wild.
    >>
    >>The meat does taste like chicken, but I think it's juicier and sweeter.
    >>
    >>Your question recalled a cartoon I saw years ago which showed a man about to enter a restaurant.
    >>He notices a procession of frogs coming around the building from the rear, where the kitchen must
    >>be, all of them legless, and moving on little crutches.
    >
    >
    > Must have been a Gary Larsen/Far Side cartoon... I always get a chuckle just thinking about the
    > "Boneless Chicken Ranch" :)
    >
    >
    If you remember "The Muppet Movie" of 1979, starring the inimitable Kermit, you would not poke fun
    at Frogs who would like to ban the consumption of frog legs. Didn't the tears run down your cheeks
    when you heard "It Isn't Easy Being Green". What a great actor/singer, in the same league with Mario
    Lanza or Ezio Pinza, though it is difficult to make out whether he sing tenor of baritone.

    What a chase throughout the film by the evil restaurant owner, whose Specialty Of The House is frog
    legs! I will not tell you how it comes out, of course.

    The supporting cast consisted of such luminaries as Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear, Gonzo, etc., all well
    cast and there were also some human actors in cameo roles, not famous, from what I remember, Orson
    Wells, Bob Hope, Mel Brooks and such. :eek:)
     
  12. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 13:22:57 GMT, Margaret Suran
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Frogleg wrote:

    >> Around here (SE Virginia) WalMart occasionally has them in the fish dept. I noticed that
    >> CajunGrocer.com mentioned "imported." They're pretty pricey. Taste like chicken. :)
    >
    >You are a Cannibal!!! What would Kermit The Frog think of you.

    Horrors! My cannibal experience was well before my present incarnation. Kermit is a great
    favorite. Now I suppose I'm going to get it in the neck for the bag of baby goldfish I have beside
    me even now...
     
  13. Stocksrus®

    Stocksrus® Guest

    "mary" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    > living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    > domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not have
    > much flavor or meat.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    Actually, I think real turtle is not allowed anymore. Mock turtle soup is big here..midwest. Frog
    legs are mostly imported now from , guess where? Bangladesh. I grew up on them and there are a few
    places around that specialized in frog legs. Not so good anymore since most are imported.

    --
    StocksRus®
     
  14. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    StocksRus® wrote:
    > "mary" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always buy frog legs. Since
    >> living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would frogs be raised
    >> domestically for that purpose, or are the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not
    >> have much flavor or meat.
    >>
    >> Tom
    >>
    > Actually, I think real turtle is not allowed anymore. Mock turtle soup is big here..midwest. Frog
    > legs are mostly imported now from , guess where? Bangladesh. I grew up on them and there are a few
    > places around that specialized in frog legs. Not so good anymore since most are imported.

    Nonsense. They "farm" turtles for soup. You can buy it at just over $11/lb. (minimum 5 lb. order) -
    that's bone-in. Unfortunately, I have no need for 5 lbs. of turtle meat.

    Jill
     
  15. Miss Jean

    Miss Jean Guest

    "mary" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > While I was living in Baltimore during the 50's, my father would always
    buy
    > frog legs. Since living there, I have never seen them. Are they unique to that area? Also would
    > frogs be raised domestically for that purpose, or
    are
    > the frogs gathered in the wild? I remember they did not have much flavor
    or
    > meat.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >

    Tom,

    Here in the South, frog legs are very common. Any decent fish market will sell them, and some
    grocery stores carry them and many restaurants serve them, battered and fried and still
    joined together. I remember as a youngster going "frog gigging" with the older folks. I have
    a soup recipe in a recipe book that my aunt gave me for Frog Soup, though I've never made it
    because it calls for the meat from the legs and backs of 12 large frogs and I don't go frog
    gigging anymore.

    Though we ate the wild ones we hunted back then, I'm fairly sure the ones I eat now at
    restaurants are farm raised.

    They do taste a great deal like chicken. :) And if you forget to cut the tendons, they'll jump
    out of the skillet when they hit the hot grease. I swear.

    Miss Jean, 9M2W6D
     
  16. Tank

    Tank Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Your question recalled a cartoon I saw years ago which showed a man about to enter a restaurant.
    > > He notices a procession of frogs coming around the building from the rear, where the kitchen
    > > must be, all of them legless, and moving on little crutches.
    >
    > Must have been a Gary Larsen/Far Side cartoon... I always get a chuckle
    just
    > thinking about the "Boneless Chicken Ranch" :)
    >

    Might also have been Sam Gross. I recall at least one cartoon of his featuring a legless frog on a
    little cart, moving himself around with little hand-held weights.

    --
    Tank

    This Space To Let
     
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