From Road to Offroad

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kenny Lee, Jan 23, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Kenny Lee

    Kenny Lee Guest

    I am a road rider who wants to get his offroad riding skills into focus. I've gone offroad riding
    only once in 2 years. The last time I did offroad I had a great time but also crashed big time. Good
    thing I was wearing a helmet. My bike at that time was an MTB wanting to be a road bike, no shock
    absorbtion. I've come to realize that certain road conditions would be best traversed using a
    properly configured bike. To make a long story short I plan on being in Utah to get in some serious
    MTB fun. How long will I need to practice offroad riding in order to develope the skills necessary
    to be at the skill level of a full-time offroad rider with intermediate level ability? All things
    being equal.

    Kenny Lee
     
    Tags:


  2. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >MTB fun. How long will I need to practice offroad riding in order to develope the skills necessary
    >to be at the skill level of a full-time offroad rider with intermediate level ability? All things
    >being equal.
    >
    >Kenny Lee

    It is impossible to say. Offroad riding presents far more challenges to handling skills than road
    riding. Different parts of the country have different conditions so riding in muddy forests might
    not prepare one for the dry desert with dusty tractionless climbs or the rocky dry stream beds one
    finds in the Southwest.

    But the main thing is just to get out and ride and have fun, learn at your own pace and work on
    developing your skills an not worry about being a rider with '"intermediate level ability" whatever
    that means.

    I have been riding motorcycles and bicycles off road for many years. To some I would be an expert,
    to some I would be a novice but to me, I just like to ride.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  3. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    I'm going to agree with Jon on this one. There's really no miracle cure for not having bike handling
    skills. The only thing you can do is ride, fall, figure out what to do right next time, try it
    again, and again, and again...

    For example: I still haven't figured out the dirt here in San Diego. I grew up riding in the
    Mid-Atlantic where traction is good, rocks and logs are big, and leaves are slickery. Here in SD,
    there's a layer of loose stuff over very hard packed dirt that still (after almost 6 years of
    part-time dirt riding) has me puzzled.

    "Jon Isaacs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >MTB fun. How long will I need to practice offroad riding in order to develope the skills
    > >necessary to be at the skill level of a full-time offroad rider with intermediate level ability?
    > >All things being equal.
    > >
    > >Kenny Lee
    >
    > It is impossible to say. Offroad riding presents far more challenges to handling skills than road
    > riding. Different parts of the country have different conditions so riding in muddy forests might
    > not prepare one for
    the
    > dry desert with dusty tractionless climbs or the rocky dry stream beds
    one
    > finds in the Southwest.
    >
    > But the main thing is just to get out and ride and have fun, learn at your
    own
    > pace and work on developing your skills an not worry about being a rider
    with
    > '"intermediate level ability" whatever that means.
    >
    > I have been riding motorcycles and bicycles off road for many years. To
    some I
    > would be an expert, to some I would be a novice but to me, I just like to
    ride.
    >
    > Jon Isaacs
     
  4. On Thu, 23 Jan 2003 16:13:13 +0800 in rec.bicycles.misc, Kenny Lee <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How long will I need to practice offroad riding in order to develope the skills necessary to be at
    > the skill level of a full-time offroad rider with intermediate level ability?

    that depends on how fast you learn physical stuff, including physical reactions that at first seem
    counter-intuitive, and what kind of coaching you have.

    if you learn quickly, you might get to that level in a training camp situation. there are a variety
    of these, some for-profit, some conducted by various cycle clubs. they can last from a weekend to
    several weeks.

    or you can increase your learning by having a knowledgeable friend tutor/mentor you on some rides
    that provide a variety of challenges and situations.

    coaching really helps. a detached observer can watch your body and bike where you can't, and someone
    experienced can tell you what you're doing wrong (or right).
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Kenny Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am a road rider who wants to get his offroad riding skills into focus. I've gone offroad riding
    > only once in 2 years. The last time I did offroad I had a great time but also crashed big time.
    > Good thing I was wearing a helmet. My bike at that time was an MTB wanting to be a road bike, no
    > shock absorbtion. I've come to realize that certain road conditions would be best traversed using
    > a properly configured bike. To make a long story short I plan on being in Utah to get in some
    > serious MTB fun. How long will I need to practice offroad riding in order to develope the skills
    > necessary to be at the skill level of a full-time offroad rider with intermediate level ability?
    > All things being equal.

    Years, I think.
     
  6. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >How long will I need to practice offroad riding in order to
    >> develope the skills necessary to be at the skill level of a full-time offroad rider with
    >> intermediate level ability? All things being equal.
    >
    >Years, I think.

    Peter, I think you pretty much hit the nail on the head.

    jon isaacs
     
  7. Flashsteve

    Flashsteve Guest

    Baloney

    I rode and raced on the road for twenty years. It took me about 20 rides to get pretty darned
    skilled at off-road riding. You will progress faster if you can either ride with skilled riders or
    actually get some technical coaching. OR, read a good off-road skills primer and learn the basics.
    There are certain things that are key to improving, such as (1) momentum is your friend (2) the
    front brake is your enemy , etc.

    Of course, these are generalizations, but get on the bike & ride alot, practice the same section
    repeatedly until you get it right.

    Steve Scarich
     
  8. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >I rode and raced on the road for twenty years. It took me about 20 rides to get pretty darned
    >skilled at off-road riding.

    At least you think you are skilled.

    I don't care how great you are, being a skilled off road rider means a lot more then just tearing
    across the country side as fast as possible.

    The most difficult part is probably judging obstacles and handling difficult terrain at night. The
    light hides holes and can fool you quite easily. I personally have never been with anyone who has
    only been on 20 rides who I would consider really competent.

    jon isaacs
     
  9. Jake Khuon

    Jake Khuon Guest

    ### On Mon, 27 Jan 2003 19:39:35 GMT, [email protected] (Jon Isaacs) [JI] casually decided to
    ### expound upon rec.bicycles.misc the following thoughts about Re: From Road to Offroad:

    JI> >I rode and raced on the road for twenty years. It took me about 20 rides to get pretty darned
    JI> >skilled at off-road riding.
    JI>
    JI> The most difficult part is probably judging obstacles and handling difficult
    JI> terrain at night. The light hides holes and can fool you quite easily. I

    My house backs right into a local heavily wooded singletrack trail system. I thought I knew my way
    around back there pretty well. Then one evening, I decided to go for a night ride. I got lost for at
    least an hour. I normally complete the main loop (2.5 miles) in about 20 minutes. Oh... and yes,
    quite a few pair of glowing eyes got to witness me wipe out on stuff I could have cleared easily in
    daylight. I'm getting better though. I still get lost but I'm starting to come back wearing less
    foliage and ground fodder.

    --
    /*===================[ Jake Khuon <[email protected]> ]======================+
    | Packet Plumber, Network Engineers /| / [~ [~ |) | | --------------- | for Effective Bandwidth
    | Utilisation / |/ [_ [_ |) |_| N E T W O R K S |
    +=========================================================================*/
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...