From the "why did they change it?" file

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sheryl Rosen, Mar 15, 2004.

  1. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    Egg noodles.

    Simple, right? You'd think so!

    Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.

    Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my mom
    used to call what Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's like they
    take the flat strips and give them a twist, so that when
    they cook, they cook up curly and twisted.

    I HATE THAT!

    If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.

    When i want noodles, I want flat noodles. Especially if
    I'm making a casserole or a kugel. But even if I'm
    making the noodles as an accompaniment to goulash or
    meatballs in gravy.

    Pennsylvania Dutch egg noodles are all twisty. The store
    brand egg noodles are all twisty. All the other brands I've
    seen at my market are twisty.

    Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    they dry so they cook up twisty? Why can't you buy flat
    noodles anymore?

    Why did they change it????
     
    Tags:


  2. "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BC7BC1E7.49055%[email protected]...
    > Egg noodles.
    >
    > Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    > Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >
    > Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    > Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my mom
    > used to call
    what
    > Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's like they take the flat
    > strips and give
    them
    > a twist, so that when they cook, they cook up curly and
    > twisted.
    >
    > I HATE THAT!
    >
    > If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.
    >
    > When i want noodles, I want flat noodles. Especially if
    > I'm making a casserole or a kugel. But even if I'm making
    > the noodles as an
    accompaniment
    > to goulash or meatballs in gravy.
    >
    > Pennsylvania Dutch egg noodles are all twisty. The store
    > brand egg noodles are all twisty. All the other brands
    > I've seen at my market are twisty.
    >
    > Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    > they dry so they
    cook
    > up twisty? Why can't you buy flat noodles anymore?
    >
    > Why did they change it????
    >
    I can't recall seeing flat egg noodles in the stupidmarket
    in at least fifteen years. Although I have seen the flat
    ones at some ethnic markets. I either live with the curly
    ones or get out the atlas and crank away.

    I wonder if the change allows sauces to stick to the noodles
    better? Just a thought.

    Jessica
     
  3. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Tue, 16 Mar 2004 01:26:19 GMT, Sheryl Rosen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Egg noodles.
    >
    >Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    >Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >
    >Now, they are flat, but also twisted.

    They always have at least one brand of flat egg noodles
    at my grocers (I know because I but them). They're
    usually in smaller packages. Standard size seems to be
    about 1.5" X 3/8"

    -sw
     
  4. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >
    > Egg noodles.
    >
    > Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    > Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >
    > Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    > Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my mom
    > used to call what Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's like
    > they take the flat strips and give them a twist, so that
    > when they cook, they cook up curly and twisted.
    >
    > I HATE THAT!
    >
    > If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.
    >
    > When i want noodles, I want flat noodles. Especially if
    > I'm making a casserole or a kugel. But even if I'm making
    > the noodles as an accompaniment to goulash or meatballs
    > in gravy.
    >
    > Pennsylvania Dutch egg noodles are all twisty. The store
    > brand egg noodles are all twisty. All the other brands
    > I've seen at my market are twisty.
    >
    > Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    > they dry so they cook up twisty? Why can't you buy flat
    > noodles anymore?
    >
    > Why did they change it????

    What's so funny is I don't recall ever seeing them flat! I
    think they are perfect with stuff like stroganoff, and you
    can pick them up with a fork. Sorry for your loss, if I see
    flat ones I'll send some along.

    nancy
     
  5. Vox Humana

    Vox Humana Guest

    "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BC7BC1E7.49055%[email protected]...
    > Egg noodles.
    >
    > Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    > Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >
    > Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    > Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my mom
    > used to call
    what
    > Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's like they take the flat
    > strips and give
    them
    > a twist, so that when they cook, they cook up curly and
    > twisted.
    >
    > I HATE THAT!
    >
    > If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.
    >
    > When i want noodles, I want flat noodles. Especially if
    > I'm making a casserole or a kugel. But even if I'm making
    > the noodles as an
    accompaniment
    > to goulash or meatballs in gravy.
    >
    > Pennsylvania Dutch egg noodles are all twisty. The store
    > brand egg noodles are all twisty. All the other brands
    > I've seen at my market are twisty.
    >
    > Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    > they dry so they
    cook
    > up twisty? Why can't you buy flat noodles anymore?
    >
    > Why did they change it????

    The twisty ones take up more space so it looks like you are
    getting more. That's my guess. I got the pasta roller/cutter
    attachment for my KitchenAid mixer for Christmas, so I don't
    buy noodles anymore. Of course, the homemade ones are flat.
    I suppose that's a $100 solution to a $1 problem but I enjoy
    making them. I made chicken ravioli yesterday with basil
    cream sauce.
     
  6. "Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 16 Mar 2004 01:26:19 GMT, Sheryl Rosen
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Egg noodles.
    > >
    > >Simple, right? You'd think so!
    > >
    > >Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    > >
    > >Now, they are flat, but also twisted.
    >
    > They always have at least one brand of flat egg noodles
    > at my grocers (I know because I but them). They're
    > usually in smaller packages. Standard size seems to be
    > about 1.5" X 3/8"
    >
    > -sw

    Good Lord, did you go to the store and whip out a tape
    measure? Is there *any* thread that goes by in here without
    your input?
     
  7. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Tue, 16 Mar 2004 01:26:19 GMT, Sheryl Rosen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    >they dry so they cook up twisty? Why can't you buy flat
    >noodles anymore?
    >
    >Why did they change it????

    Maybe the twisty ones don't break as much?

    Sue(tm) Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  8. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    > Sheryl Rosen writes:
    >
    >Egg noodles.
    >
    >Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    >Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >
    >Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    >Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my mom
    >used to call what Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's like they
    >take the flat strips and give them a twist, so that when
    >they cook, they cook up curly and twisted.
    >
    >I HATE THAT!
    >
    >If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.
    >
    >When i want noodles, I want flat noodles. Especially if
    >I'm making a casserole or a kugel. But even if I'm making
    >the noodles as an accompaniment to goulash or meatballs
    >in gravy.
    >
    >Pennsylvania Dutch egg noodles are all twisty. The store
    >brand egg noodles are all twisty. All the other brands I've
    >seen at my market are twisty.
    >
    >Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    >they dry so they cook up twisty? Why can't you buy flat
    >noodles anymore?
    >
    >Why did they change it????

    Curly/twisted noodles are a product of worn pasta dies.
    Years ago rather than toss out the imperfect (not flat)
    noodles they began to market them. Now it seems they simply
    use the worn pasta dies rather than continusly replace them
    with nice new smooth slippery ones (and worn dies can go a
    very long time before they wear so much that they become
    totally non-functional). New pasta dies are not cheap and
    down time is expensive while they're changed (and there are
    many hundreds of dies on one extruder. If you'll notice,
    various shapes of pasta cost more (yet the ingredients,
    packaging, and handling is exactly the same as any other),
    that's because the dies used to produce those particular
    more intricate shapes are more prone to wear and those
    shapes produced with a distorted configuration simply will
    not sell... the higher price compensates for the
    changing/maintaining of the dies, and those dies are
    expensive... the more simple shape pasta may be extruded
    using teflon dies (plastic - relatively inexpensive as they
    are mass produced using plastic injection molding) but the
    more intricate shapes require bronze dies, and bronze dies
    need to be cast and then hand finished and hand polished,
    bronze die production and fitting requires many hours labor
    by highly paid skilled craftsmen.

    Of course my explanation is an over simplification of what
    in actuality is a very complicated proceedure... perhaps
    this will help clarify... pay particular attention to pg.
    two, center:

    http://www.maldari.com/design_and_performance_of_pasta_.htm

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
    NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
    devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  9. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], Steve Wertz at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/15/04 8:56 PM:

    > On Tue, 16 Mar 2004 01:26:19 GMT, Sheryl Rosen
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Egg noodles.
    >>
    >> Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >>
    >> Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >>
    >> Now, they are flat, but also twisted.
    >
    > They always have at least one brand of flat egg noodles
    > at my grocers (I know because I but them). They're
    > usually in smaller packages. Standard size seems to be
    > about 1.5" X 3/8"
    >
    > -sw

    I checked my pantry and found a bag of "Mother's Egg
    Noodles" Medium width (probably 3/8", I didn't measure it,
    just eyeballed it...maybe a quarter inch), in a 10 ounce
    bag. It has a sticker on it that says 99 cents. They are
    FLAT. That's rather expensive, IMO, for what it is. I will
    check the kosher food aisle, and see if they have flat
    noodles there in different widths.

    Does Mueller's still make noodles? I remember they had
    nice big wide noodles at one time....maybe an inch wide
    (uncooked). I liked those with meatballs, stroganoff,
    etc. The medium width are nice in casseroles and kugels,
    and the fine noodles are good in chicken soup and to
    break up and put into rice pilaf. They came in a box,
    too, which was nice.

    I also recall Goodman's noodles from when I was little. We
    always used either Goodman's or Mueller's when I was growing
    up. In a box.
     
  10. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], Nancy Young at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/15/04 8:57 PM:

    > What's so funny is I don't recall ever seeing them flat! I
    > think they are perfect with stuff like stroganoff, and you
    > can pick them up with a fork. Sorry for your loss, if I
    > see flat ones I'll send some along.
    >
    > nancy

    I made beef goulash last night (not the hamburger/macaroni
    mixture that some people call goulash, that's what I call
    American Chop Suey or Beefy-Mac)...I basically used the
    goulash recipe in Joy of Cooking, leaving out the bell
    peppers and the sour cream because my friend does not care
    for peppers and sour cream is very mean to me. It was tasty
    and I served it over egg noodles. As I glanced across the
    table at my friend's plate, I noticed how funny the noodles
    looked on her plate, all curly and twisty, with gravy on
    them. I thought they looked funny. What can I say?

    I have an Atlas pasta roller. Perhaps I should just make my
    own. Anyone have a recipe for Egg Noodles? (such as one
    would serve in soup or with stroganoff or goulash, not
    Italian pasta)
     
  11. Dan Levy

    Dan Levy Guest

    "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BC7BC1E7.49055%[email protected]...

    > Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    > they dry so they
    cook
    > up twisty? Why can't you buy flat noodles anymore?

    > Why did they change it????

    I also remember many of the old noodles having cooking
    instructions that said to put them in the boiling water then
    put a lid on and *turn the heat off*, letting them cook in
    the still hot water.

    My guess is this technique, a little less user-friendly than
    just boiling at a constant rate until done, with pot open to
    facilitate sampling for al denteness as the time approached,
    was needed to keep the noodles from sticking together in big
    lumps. The twisty noodles present smaller amounts of
    parallel surface to one another and don't stick together so
    tenaciously.
     
  12. Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >
    > Egg noodles.
    >
    > Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    > Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >
    > Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    > Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my mom
    > used to call what Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's like
    > they take the flat strips and give them a twist, so that
    > when they cook, they cook up curly and twisted.
    >
    > I HATE THAT!
    >
    > If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.
    >
    > When i want noodles, I want flat noodles. Especially if
    > I'm making a casserole or a kugel. But even if I'm making
    > the noodles as an accompaniment to goulash or meatballs
    > in gravy.
    >
    > Pennsylvania Dutch egg noodles are all twisty. The store
    > brand egg noodles are all twisty. All the other brands
    > I've seen at my market are twisty.
    >
    > Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    > they dry so they cook up twisty? Why can't you buy flat
    > noodles anymore?
    >
    > Why did they change it????

    Doesn't bother me in the least. I don't really see what
    difference it makes. I've used PA Dutch egg noodles for as
    long as I can remember, which is a damn long time, and I
    don't recall them being flat at any point. If they were I
    guess I just never noticed the change. Kate

    --
    Kate Connally “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead
    already.” Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.” What if the hokey pokey
    really *is* what it's all about? mailto:[email protected]
     
  13. stan

    stan Guest

    Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Egg noodles.

    > Simple, right? You'd think so!

    > Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.

    > Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    > Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my mom
    > used to call what Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's like
    > they take the flat strips and give them a twist, so that
    > when they cook, they cook up curly and twisted.

    > I HATE THAT!

    > If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.

    Where do you live? Here in the Philly area, both twisted and
    flat egg noodles have been available in the Kosher section
    of most grocery stores for many years. Take your pick.
     
  14. stan

    stan Guest

    Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Egg noodles.

    > Simple, right? You'd think so!

    Oops. I just realized who I responded to.

    You guys in Connecticut must be egg noodle deprived.

    Perhaps you can find what you want, in a flat egg noodle at
    Zabar's the next time we get together in NYC.
     
  15. "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BC7BC1E7.49055%[email protected]...
    > Egg noodles.
    >
    > Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    > Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >
    > Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    > Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my mom
    > used to call
    what
    > Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's like they take the flat
    > strips and give
    them
    > a twist, so that when they cook, they cook up curly and
    > twisted.
    >
    > I HATE THAT!
    >
    > If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.
    >
    > When i want noodles, I want flat noodles. Especially if
    > I'm making a casserole or a kugel. But even if I'm making
    > the noodles as an
    accompaniment
    > to goulash or meatballs in gravy.
    >
    > Pennsylvania Dutch egg noodles are all twisty. The store
    > brand egg noodles are all twisty. All the other brands
    > I've seen at my market are twisty.
    >
    > Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    > they dry so they
    cook
    > up twisty? Why can't you buy flat noodles anymore?
    >
    > Why did they change it????
    >

    What about Goodman's or Mueller's? I don't think they twist
    their noodles. Well, not in the box, anyway. Well, not in
    the noodle box, anyway. Sheesh, I'm digging myself a hole
    here, aren't I?

    Jack Goodmanoodletwisterama
     
  16. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    Here's another thing. Remember when you could buy American
    Beauty "long" spaghetti in most grocery stores? It was about
    two feet long, probably twice as long as normal.

    I don't know why, but I prefer it that way. And I haven't
    seen it in years.

    I know shelf space is a premium commodity, but it would be
    so cool to be able to get that again....

    --
    Mark Shaw contact info at homepage -->
    http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
    ========================================================================

    "[The Blues] is the kind of music that doesn't mince words
    -- it gets right to it." -Bonnie Raitt
     
  17. Dan Levy

    Dan Levy Guest

    "Dan Levy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > My guess is this technique, a little less user-friendly
    > than just boiling
    at
    > a constant rate until done, with pot open to facilitate
    > sampling for al denteness as the time approached, was
    > needed to keep the noodles from sticking together in
    > big lumps.

    Also, from sticking to the bottom of the pan
     
  18. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Jessica Vincent wrote:

    >
    > >
    > > If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.
    > >
    > > When i want noodles, I want flat noodles. Especially if
    > > I'm making a casserole or a kugel. But even if I'm
    > > making the noodles as an
    > accompaniment
    > > to goulash or meatballs in gravy.
    > >
    > > Pennsylvania Dutch egg noodles are all twisty. The store
    > > brand egg noodles are all twisty. All the other brands
    > > I've seen at my market are twisty.
    > >
    > > Does anyone know why they now twist the noodles before
    > > they dry so they
    > cook
    > > up twisty? Why can't you buy flat noodles anymore?
    > >
    > > Why did they change it????
    > >
    > I can't recall seeing flat egg noodles in the stupidmarket
    > in at least fifteen years. Although I have seen the flat
    > ones at some ethnic markets. I either live with the curly
    > ones or get out the atlas and crank away.
    >
    > I wonder if the change allows sauces to stick to the
    > noodles better? Just a thought.

    I thought that maybe it was because they take up more space
    in the bag and make it look like you are getting more.
     
  19. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], [email protected] at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/16/04 1:41 PM:

    > Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Egg noodles.
    >
    >> Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    >> Used to be, egg noodles were flat strips of pasta.
    >
    >> Now, they are flat, but also twisted. Not twisted, like
    >> Rotini/Rotelli/fusilli/"bed springs" (which is what my
    >> mom used to call what Ronzoni calls Rotini), but it's
    >> like they take the flat strips and give them a twist, so
    >> that when they cook, they cook up curly and twisted.
    >
    >> I HATE THAT!
    >
    >> If I want twisty pasta, I'll buy bed spring pasta.
    >
    > Where do you live? Here in the Philly area, both
    > twisted and flat egg noodles have been available in the
    > Kosher section of most grocery stores for many years.
    > Take your pick.
    >

    Stan???? You know where I live!!!! You've been here!!!! LOL
     
  20. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], [email protected] at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/16/04 1:42 PM:

    > Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Egg noodles.
    >
    >> Simple, right? You'd think so!
    >
    > Oops. I just realized who I responded to.

    See my response to other post!!!!

    >
    > You guys in Connecticut must be egg noodle deprived.

    We must be.

    >
    > Perhaps you can find what you want, in a flat egg noodle
    > at Zabar's the next time we get together in NYC.

    I'll look. But you might have to remind me because I doubt
    I'll remember.
     
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