front dynohub - wheel building

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by dan_s, Jan 8, 2005.

  1. dan_s

    dan_s Guest

    i'm trying to calculate the spoke length for a wheel with a front
    sturmey archer dynohub and a sun CR18 26x1-3/8 rim.
    in the instructions for wheel building
    http://www.rickadee.net/~zephyrus/ad4935/ad4935.html (thanks!) they
    write that the rim should be off-centre.
    does anyone know the reason for that and how much off should it be?
    better still, the exact lengths of the spokes?

    dan
     
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  2. Dan Limon writes:

    > I'm trying to calculate the spoke length for a wheel with a front
    > Sturmey archer dynohub and a sun CR18 26x1-3/8 rim. In the
    > instructions for wheel building:


    http://www.rickadee.net/~zephyrus/ad4935/ad4935.html

    > they write that the rim should be off-centre. Does anyone know the
    > reason for that and how much off should it be? Better still, the
    > exact lengths of the spokes?


    Use the standard spoke length programs available on the web and enter
    cross zero for the lacing pattern. The 'dish' of the wheel is
    immaterial to spoke length, the cosine of small angles being
    essentially one. The offset will develop itself as you center the rim
    between the locknuts on the axle as is standard for wheels.

    Jobst Brandt
    [email protected]
     
  3. [email protected] wrote:
    > Dan Limon writes:
    >
    > > I'm trying to calculate the spoke length for a wheel with a front
    > > Sturmey archer dynohub and a sun CR18 26x1-3/8 rim. In the
    > > instructions for wheel building:

    ....
    >
    > Use the standard spoke length programs available on the web and enter
    > cross zero for the lacing pattern. The 'dish' of the wheel is
    > immaterial to spoke length, the cosine of small angles being
    > essentially one. The offset will develop itself as you center the

    rim
    > between the locknuts on the axle as is standard for wheels.
    >


    Dan- Damon Rinard's Spocalc has values for many hubs and rims already
    in place. I checked mine (an older download) and it has values for the
    Sturmey Dynohub and a Sun CR20 rim. If those aren't close enough, you
    can measure the rim yourself and manually input values. It's available
    at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/rinard/spocalc.htm . As Jobst says, any
    assymetry will resolve itself as you true the wheel.

    Jobst- why "cross zero"? Surely you aren't recommending he build the
    wheel radially. The keyhole spoke holes on the small flange would make
    it difficult to keep the wheel tensioned and true, I think.

    Jeff
     
  4. Jeff Wills writes:

    >> Use the standard spoke length programs available on the web and
    >> enter cross zero for the lacing pattern. The 'dish' of the wheel
    >> is immaterial to spoke length, the cosine of small angles being
    >> essentially one. The offset will develop itself as you center the
    >> rim between the locknuts on the axle as is standard for wheels.


    > Dan- Damon Rinard's Spocalc has values for many hubs and rims
    > already in place. I checked mine (an older download) and it has
    > values for the Sturmey Dynohub and a Sun CR20 rim. If those aren't
    > close enough, you can measure the rim yourself and manually input
    > values. It's available at:


    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/rinard/spocalc.htm

    > As Jobst says, any asymmetry will resolve itself as you true the
    > wheel.


    > Jobst- why "cross zero"? Surely you aren't recommending he build the
    > wheel radially. The keyhole spoke holes on the small flange would
    > make it difficult to keep the wheel tensioned and true, I think.


    I don't see any reason to cross lace spokes on a steel flange of that
    diameter. I have one like that and the small flange should be cross
    three so that the double keyhole spoke holes in the hub will give
    their best support to the spokes.

    Jobst Brandt
    [email protected]
     
  5. [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > I don't see any reason to cross lace spokes on a steel flange of that
    > diameter. I have one like that and the small flange should be cross
    > three so that the double keyhole spoke holes in the hub will give
    > their best support to the spokes.
    >
    > Jobst Brandt
    > [email protected]


    OK- radial on the large flange side, 3X on the small flange. It'll look
    cool!

    FWIW: there's a drum-braked single-speed cruiser running around town
    with a radial-spoked front wheel. I don't think it gets heavy braking
    on that wheel...

    Jeff
     
  6. Quoth Jobst Brandt:

    [Sturmey-Archer DynoHub with huge flange on one side]

    > I don't see any reason to cross lace spokes on a steel flange of that
    > diameter. I have one like that and the small flange should be cross
    > three so that the double keyhole spoke holes in the hub will give
    > their best support to the spokes.


    There's no techincal reason, but as a practical matter, it may be
    difficult to find appropriate length spokes for this at a typical LBS.

    Sheldon "253 mm?" Brown
    +----------------------------------------+
    | The race is not always to the swift, |
    | nor the battle to the strong |
    | -but that's the way to bet. |
    | --Damon Runyon |
    +----------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
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