front wheel drive recumbent trike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Daniel Parry, May 15, 2003.

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  1. Daniel Parry

    Daniel Parry Guest

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  2. Daniel Parry

    Daniel Parry Guest

  3. Daniel Parry wrote:

    > Is this a flawed design? The only example I could find was:
    >
    > http://home.mindspring.com/~kb7mxu/images/Zenit.jpg
    >
    > Just curious as the chain lengths involved look really quite long on the rear wheel drive trikes.

    Nothing much wrong with the design; the real problem seems to be availability. I've heard a Several
    of stories about people who have been waiting months, if not years, for trikes.

    FWIW there are other FWD trikes, with a single front wheel, which usually steer by leaning.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
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  4. Mads Hilberg

    Mads Hilberg Guest

    > FWIW there are other FWD trikes, with a single front wheel, which usually steer by leaning.

    And of course there are FWD 2-wheel recumbents as well. These rely on the 'natural' ability of a
    chain to twist slightly at each link. Zox makes some nice ones - especially their tandem looks very
    well thought out (the ultimate in independent pedalling) http://www.zoxbikes.com/index_e.html

    Mads
     
  5. On Thu, 15 May 2003 12:02:32 -0400, Daniel Parry wrote:

    > Is this a flawed design? The only example I could find was:
    >
    > http://home.mindspring.com/~kb7mxu/images/Zenit.jpg
    >
    > Just curious as the chain lengths involved look really quite long on the rear wheel drive trikes.

    It's the natural way to make a hand-powered trike. I saw a couple over the past weekend on TOSRV
    ridden by cyclists missing both legs. The ride was 100 miles out and 100 miles back the next day,
    and both bikes made it without incident, so how badly flawed could the design be?
     
  6. Daniel Parry

    Daniel Parry Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Steve Palincsar wrote:
    > It's the natural way to make a hand-powered trike. I saw a couple over the past weekend on TOSRV
    > ridden by cyclists missing both legs. The ride was 100 miles out and 100 miles back the next day,
    > and both bikes made it without incident, so how badly flawed could the design be?

    I guess not flawed at all, then? ^_^ I'm curious as to whether a front wheel drive would
    perform/handle better than a rear wheel drive recumbent trike. Are there parallels with front/rear
    wheel drive cars?

    cheers

    daniel
     
  7. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Daniel Parry wrote:

    > I guess not flawed at all, then? ^_^ I'm curious as to whether a front wheel drive would
    > perform/handle better than a rear wheel drive recumbent trike. Are there parallels with front/rear
    > wheel drive cars?

    I think the main parallel is that it's intrinsically harder to drive a wheel that you have to steer
    as well, especially where power comes from cranks that are ideally in line with both the rider's
    legs and the powered axles. You could try rear wheel steering, but I recall an answer in C+ once
    from a Mr. M. Burrows to such a question suggesting that (for various reasons I can't recall) such
    machines tend to be the province of people with red noses called Koko.

    An interesting solution for both bikes and trikes is the Flevo, which steers through a joint in the
    middle of the frame. These can be ridden entirely hands free routinely, with the bars just somewhere
    to mount brake and gear controls (if you can ride them at all!) Pretty much proof against
    opportunist rideaway theft! See http://www.flevobike.nl for more info...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  8. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:

    : I think the main parallel is that it's intrinsically harder to drive a wheel that you have to
    : steer as well, especially where power comes from cranks that are ideally in line with both the
    : rider's legs and the powered axles.

    http://www.eland.org.uk/s327.html

    for another (nice) example.

    The basic problem is that if you do this you can do longer use many standard bike parts making the
    whole thing very expensive. The russians could do it 'cos they had a whole load of cnc machining kit
    standing idle after the collapse of the ussr.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  9. here's another fwd trike: www.m-gineering.nl/caferace.htm

    --
    Marten
     
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