Front willie on a mountain bike?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Brett, Jun 8, 2003.

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  1. Brett

    Brett Guest

    Sometimes I see pro mountain bike riders do a nose willie. The back tire isn't very high off the
    ground and the rear end usually swings out a little. Any one have some tips on how this is done?

    Thanks, Brett
     
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  2. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote
    > Sometimes I see pro mountain bike riders do a nose willie. The back tire isn't very high off the
    > ground and the rear end usually swings out a
    little.
    > Any one have some tips on how this is done?
    >
    > Thanks, Brett

    The key to doing a 'nose wheelie' is practice. Good brakes help.

    Pete
     
  3. W K

    W K Guest

    "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > Sometimes I see pro mountain bike riders do a nose willie. The back
    tire
    > > isn't very high off the ground and the rear end usually swings out a
    > little.
    > > Any one have some tips on how this is done?
    > >
    > > Thanks, Brett
    >
    > The key to doing a 'nose wheelie' is practice. Good brakes help.

    They used to be called "endos". There is a slight body movement required to help the end come up.

    I still have all the reflex actions to control one, as I found out when I got my first V-brakes.
     
  4. Brett

    Brett Guest

    "W K" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > > Sometimes I see pro mountain bike riders do a nose willie. The back
    > tire
    > > > isn't very high off the ground and the rear end usually swings out a
    > > little.
    > > > Any one have some tips on how this is done?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks, Brett
    > >
    > > The key to doing a 'nose wheelie' is practice. Good brakes help.
    >
    > They used to be called "endos". There is a slight body movement required to help the end come up.
    >
    > I still have all the reflex actions to control one, as I found out when I got my first V-brakes.
    >
    >
    Endos don't move...I think. Maybe rolling endo? I use to do it very good on my freestyle bike but
    guess it's back to the basic on the mountain bike.

    Brett
     
  5. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Sometimes I see pro mountain bike riders do a nose willie. The back tire isn't very high off the
    > ground and the rear end usually swings out a
    little.
    > Any one have some tips on how this is done?
    >
    > Thanks, Brett
    >

    Gave me a good laugh this morning! It brought me back to the question from a Frenchman awhile back
    who wanted to know "how do I pull a willie?".

    Pat
     
  6. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > > > The key to doing a 'nose wheelie' is practice. Good brakes help.
    > >
    > > They used to be called "endos". There is a slight body movement required to help the end
    > > come up.
    > >
    > > I still have all the reflex actions to control one, as I found out when
    I
    > > got my first V-brakes.
    > >
    > >
    > Endos don't move...I think. Maybe rolling endo? I use to do it very good on my freestyle bike but
    > guess it's back to the basic on the mountain
    bike.

    You are right, it will be very different on your mountain bike, mostly because the center of gravity
    is different and you don't have nearly as much space to move around. Your freestyle bike probably
    had the seat down around your knees if you were standing on the pedals. The mountain bike will never
    get the seat that low. This restricts how far you can lift the rear wheel before the seat contacts
    you somewhere and pushes you over the bars.

    A set of v-brakes will really help you get the stopping force to endo. My first panic stop on my
    mountain bike after switching from cantilevers to v-brakes put me over the bars instantly. I tend to
    stop fairly hard fairly often and lifting the rear wheel while stopping is a regular occurence. Just
    be ready for it when it happens and be prepared to let up a bit on the brakes. Don't panic and clamp
    down or you will go over. Also notice that most guys get off the seat and move waaaayy back. This
    moves the center of gravity back far enough to get maximum height from the rear wheel without going
    over the bars.

    Get some speed, get off the saddle and hit the front brake. Up (and hopefully not over) you will
    go. Of course, maybe your best bet is to save the mountain bike for trails and break out the
    freestyle bike for the endos. A mountain bike can do it, but it is certainly more impressive on the
    right kind of bike.

    Good luck, Buck
     
  7. Brett

    Brett Guest

    "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > > > The key to doing a 'nose wheelie' is practice. Good brakes help.
    > > >
    > > > They used to be called "endos". There is a slight body movement required to help the end
    > > > come up.
    > > >
    > > > I still have all the reflex actions to control one, as I found out
    when
    > I
    > > > got my first V-brakes.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > Endos don't move...I think. Maybe rolling endo? I use to do it very
    good
    > > on my freestyle bike but guess it's back to the basic on the mountain
    > bike.
    >
    > You are right, it will be very different on your mountain bike, mostly because the center of
    > gravity is different and you don't have nearly as
    much
    > space to move around. Your freestyle bike probably had the seat down
    around
    > your knees if you were standing on the pedals. The mountain bike will
    never
    > get the seat that low. This restricts how far you can lift the rear wheel before the seat contacts
    > you somewhere and pushes you over the bars.
    >
    > A set of v-brakes will really help you get the stopping force to endo. My first panic stop on my
    > mountain bike after switching from cantilevers to v-brakes put me over the bars instantly. I tend
    > to stop fairly hard fairly often and lifting the rear wheel while stopping is a regular occurence.
    Just
    > be ready for it when it happens and be prepared to let up a bit on the brakes. Don't panic and
    > clamp down or you will go over. Also notice that most guys get off the seat and move waaaayy back.
    > This moves the center of gravity back far enough to get maximum height from the rear wheel without
    > going over the bars.
    >
    > Get some speed, get off the saddle and hit the front brake. Up (and hopefully not over) you will
    > go. Of course, maybe your best bet is to save the mountain bike for trails and break out the
    > freestyle bike for the
    endos.
    > A mountain bike can do it, but it is certainly more impressive on the
    right
    > kind of bike.

    I thought it looked better on the mountain bike. These guys come across the finish line, raise
    the rear end while sitting back over the seat, swing the back to the side and ride the willie.
    Very neat.

    >
    > Good luck, Buck
     
  8. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:T43Fa.39685

    Buck wrote:

    > > A mountain bike can do it, but it is certainly more impressive on the
    > right
    > > kind of bike.

    Brett:

    > I thought it looked better on the mountain bike. These guys come across
    the
    > finish line, raise the rear end while sitting back over the seat, swing
    the
    > back to the side and ride the willie. Very neat.

    Please, please stop calling it a "willie." The word you are looking for is "wheelie," a derivative
    of the word "wheel." "Willie" is a slang term for your private parts or, if the word "slick" is
    added to it, a term for a former president.

    -Buck
     
  9. Brett

    Brett Guest

    "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:T43Fa.39685
    >
    > Buck wrote:
    >
    > > > A mountain bike can do it, but it is certainly more impressive on the
    > > right
    > > > kind of bike.
    >
    > Brett:
    >
    > > I thought it looked better on the mountain bike. These guys come across
    > the
    > > finish line, raise the rear end while sitting back over the seat, swing
    > the
    > > back to the side and ride the willie. Very neat.
    >
    > Please, please stop calling it a "willie." The word you are looking for is "wheelie," a derivative
    > of the word "wheel." "Willie" is a slang term for your private parts or, if the word "slick" is
    > added to it, a term for a former president.
    >
    > -Buck
    >
    Yes - you are right. Sorry.

    Brett
     
  10. W K

    W K Guest

    "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote in message

    > > brakes. Don't panic and clamp down or you will go over. Also notice that most guys get off the
    > > seat and move waaaayy back. This moves the center
    of
    > > gravity back far enough to get maximum height from the rear wheel
    without
    > > going over the bars.

    Pah! I'd prefer duration over height. oops, perhaps that looks odd when we are talking willies.

    > > A mountain bike can do it, but it is certainly more impressive on the
    > right
    > > kind of bike.

    Pah! Right kind of bike eh? see below.

    > I thought it looked better on the mountain bike. These guys come across
    the
    > finish line, raise the rear end while sitting back over the seat, swing
    the
    > back to the side and ride the

    I'd still call it an endo. Anyway, from what you say I'd think its a question of learning endos, and
    then learning to control them as they go a little to far. After a while it'll look good - you'll do
    it smoothly. The only thing that would worry me would be going too far, but I suppose the guys that
    really know what they are doing can hop out of it. I thought you might be meaning the BMX trick
    where they seem to roll all over the place on the front wheel, thats got to take some practice.

    Right bike? Well I learned to do rolling endos on a kid's 26 inch wheel racer (old style, not MTB
    26") . One day I'll re-learn them and perhaps re-learn unicycling on a fixed wheel road bike.

    Wheelies on tandems. Now thats a step too far, but I'd love to see it done.
     
  11. On Mon, 09 Jun 2003 09:44:49 +0000, Pat wrote:

    > Gave me a good laugh this morning! It brought me back to the question from a Frenchman awhile back
    > who wanted to know "how do I pull a willie?".

    Being French, you'd think he'd know.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front _`\(,_ | of enough
    typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the
    collected works of Shakespeare. The internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  12. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "W K" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > I'd still call it an endo.

    Maybe I'm old school, but an 'endo' is NOT something you really want to do.

    "End over end"

    i.e. a crash in which you go over the front. A nose wheelie is merely the first
    (unpainful) part...;)

    Pete
     
  13. Mark Lee

    Mark Lee Guest

    "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Sometimes I see pro mountain bike riders do a nose willie. The back tire isn't very high off the
    > ground and the rear end usually swings out a
    little.
    > Any one have some tips on how this is done?
    >
    First, you need a really long willie. Mark Lee
     
  14. "Mark Lee" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Sometimes I see pro mountain bike riders do a nose willie. The back tire isn't very high off the
    > > ground and the rear end usually swings out a
    > little.
    > > Any one have some tips on how this is done?
    > >
    > First, you need a really long willie.

    Hmm :) some years back the world record - on a motorcycle, was 150m or so.

    --
    __o | Øyvind Røtvold _`\(, | http://www.darkside.no/olr/index.html (_)/(_) | ... biciclare
    necesse est ...
     
  15. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    > > > Sometimes I see pro mountain bike riders do a nose willie. The back
    tire
    > > > isn't very high off the ground and the rear end usually swings out a
    > > little.
    > > > Any one have some tips on how this is done?

    > > >
    > > First, you need a really long willie.

    >
    > Hmm :) some years back the world record - on a motorcycle, was 150m or so.
    >
    >
    > --
    > __o | Øyvind Røtvold
    >

    Now THERE's a willie! Bret, the word is "wheelie."

    Pat
     
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