frugal low-carbing

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Apr 22, 2006.

  1. Well, I do low-carb cheaply, but hubby does not low-carb at all, so the
    post is only partially about low-carbing frugally.

    I am *extremely* cheap when I shop. I went shopping today as a matter
    of fact. I shop about every 10-12 days or so.

    Here's where I went...

    Store #1 (Karn's). This store is on the other side of Carlisle from
    me. So I don't go there every time, only if they have sales that make
    it worthwhile as it's about 15 minutes away and there has to be deals
    worth the gas for me to go there. They had whole pork loins for
    $1.38/lb, so it was a no-brainer to go today.

    Store #2 (Weis) and store #3 (Giant). These stores are in Carlisle. I
    live about 4 miles from Carlisle, so hit these stores nearly every
    time, but sometimes just one or the other.

    Store #4 (Shurfine) - This is on my way home, on this side of Carlisle,
    so often in the regular rotation too.

    I also go to Aldi's about every 2 months or so. It's a good half hour
    away, in either Harribsurg or Chambersburg, so I only go when I have an
    errand in either place. Aldi's has really, really good prices on a lot
    of stuff... I have cases of canned fruit for hubby and get most of his
    junk food there and most of my non-food products like aluminum foil,
    toilet paper, etc. But I didn't do Aldi's today.

    What I bought today...

    a whole pork loin - cut into 2 huge roasts and 27 chops
    4 quarts heavy cream
    pack of Mission low-carb tortillas
    4 green bell peppers
    1 honeydew melon
    5 lbs zucchini
    1.5 lbs yellow summer squash
    2 Bartlett pears
    7 lbs vidalia onions (for canning - I make a great sweet onion relish)
    2 cucumbers
    3 tomatoes
    4 large packs of batteries
    1/2 lb catnip (for... the cats, of course!)
    2 12-packs of soda (for hubby to take on the road)
    2 2-liters of diet sode
    2 boxes of saltine crackers
    3 lbs red bell peppers
    1/2 watermelon
    head of Boston lettuce
    head of radicchio
    3 large cartons of cottage cheese
    2 loaves of whole wheat bread (for hubby... was buy one, get one free)
    8 boxes Pasta Roni (for my sister-in-law, apparently they can't get the
    same flavors in Canada... also on sale buy one, get one free)
    lb of baby bella mushrooms
    container of sour cream
    bulk package of dried parsley
    pack of baby carrots (for hubby to take on the road)
    marked-down easter cake from the bakery (in the freezer for hubby)
    container of Parmesan cheese
    2 12-packs of off-brand Pop Tarts (hubby loves them for some
    inexplicable reason)

    Most of these items were on sale. I stock up at sales. We have a
    freezer, huge pantry, root cellar, etc. My overall goal is to buy
    everything on sale. I don't always make it, some stuff never goes on
    sale, and sometimes in spite of all my planning and organizing, we run
    out of something critical.

    I spent $111 today. I'll probably wind up spending around $250 total
    this month on food, including all the meals my husband eats on the road
    (he's a truck driver), eating out and pet food.

    I send frozen meals with hubby that he can reheat in an electric
    lunchbox thingy (ham and scalloped potatoes, roast and mashed potatoes
    with mixed veggies, hamburger/cabbage stiryfry, chicken & rice, etc.).
    I also can other meals for him too (chili, split pea soup, baked beans,
    etc). He generally only eats one actual meal a day, and otherwise
    snacks. I send some junk food, about half store-bought stuff and half
    home-baked stuff. But I send a lot of "good" snacks he can eat when
    driving - carrots, fruit, nuts, raisins, crackers, trail mix, etc. And
    I usually send sandwich fixings too. He probably eats better than 90%
    of the drivers out there - both healtheir and yummier.

    My daughter doesn't live here, but nearby. She is young and poor...
    and therefore sometimes does her "grocery shopping" at my house when
    she's broke. She takes piles of stuff out of here semi-regularly.

    We've got enough pork for the next 4 months easy. In fact, my freezer
    is entirely full of meat after putting the loin in, about a year's
    worth overall - I bought a whole beef round a month or so ago, a whole
    ham the month before that and 40 lbs of chicken a few months earlier -
    plus there's random stuff bought on sale in smaller quantities: italian
    sausage, polish sausage, smoked sausage, breakfast sausage, ground
    chuck, corned beef, mozzarella, cheddar, colby, monterey jack, about 10
    packs of various frozen veggies, couple packs of ravioli, lunch meats,
    butter, etc.

    My pantry is a bunch of shelves 8 foot high by 8 foot wide by 4 foot
    deep. It's always full. Home-canned pickles, relishes, soups, beans,
    broths and meats fill probably half of it. There's a good bit of
    home-dehydrated foods too, though they don't take up any space to speak
    of - lotsa food in little space: carrots, swiss chard,tomatoes, celery,
    onions, garlic, etc. The rest is store-bought stuff: cases of
    peaches, pears, pineapple, pumpkin, peanut butter, black olives and
    spaghetti sauce; dried goods like pasta, dried beans and peas, whole
    grains of all sorts, crackers; bottles of various wines, vinegars and
    oils; canned meats; condiments (soy sauce, salad dressings, mayo,
    aspartame, etc.); and bulk baking supplies of every imaginable sort.

    My root cellar is low... we finished the piles of cabbage I got on sale
    around St. Patrick's Day had lots of corned beef and cabbage,
    hamburger/cabbage stirfry and cole slaw for a while. There's only
    maybe 10 lbs each of potatoes and onions in there. I'll replenish from
    the garden shortly.

    I also have giant containers of dry goods on top of my fridge: nuts,
    chocolate and butterscotch chips, oatmeal, soft wheatm hard wheat,
    other grains, powdered milk, etc. Most of these are replenished from
    giant buckets on my porch cause I buy in bulk.

    Since the garden will be producing soon, my costs will be cut in half.
    In summer, it only costs me around $100-150/month to feed us rather
    than the extravagant $250/month I spend in winter. Sugar snap peas and
    lettuces will be ready shortly...

    We eat out rarely. Sometimes, hubby will have a break in town, but
    have to deliver nearby before coming home, so we'll meet at a truckstop
    for dinner, share a shower, and watch a movie in the truck. And I take
    my daughter out to lunch or dinner maybe once a month or so.

    But... even including the cost of eating out, gardening supplies, food
    for the cats (one of which drinks half of the cream I buy!) and chicken
    feed, I average under $200/month year round to feed us.

    Tonight, I had to wrap the meat to freeze when I got home. I also cut
    up a lot of the fruit and veggies ahead of time so I can make salads
    fast. I'm lazy, so stuff will go bad unless it's prepped right away.
    If it's prepped, I munch on veggies all day...

    I plan my meals based on produce because everything else will keep.
    Plus, frankly, produce is what I most like, most crave, most think
    about when it comes to food. I'll pick the protein based on what goes
    with the produce.

    My breakfasts for the next 10 days or so will be cottage cheese and
    melon. I have a big batch of turkey salad in the fridge, so along with
    the garden salad ingredients, that will be my lunches for a while.

    Over the next week or so... I'll bake and freeze a couple butterscotch
    zucchini cakes for hubby, can up some sugar-free onion relish (I love
    the stuff with sausage), fry up a mess of bell peppers with onion and
    garlic with some Italian sausage out of the freezer, steam a bunch of
    zucchini and yellow squash with herbs with a thick ham slice, probably
    do quiche with the mushrooms and some mozzarella cheese (as the hens
    are laying like crazy and I've got a lot of eggs here).

    I don't cook daily. I keep a lot of foods like ricotta, cottage cheese
    and yogurt around. I always have protein powder and fixings for a fast
    snack/meal. I keep fresh produce already cut up so salads and such are
    easy. For actual cooked meals, I cook when I'm in the mood to cook,
    usually cook 2 or 3 meals at once, and then nuke when I'm in the mood
    to eat.
    So... there's nothing to do for breakfast or lunch, and often dinner,
    but open containers, and usually if dinner is more complex, it just
    involves nuking.

    There's prep work, of course, but I consider that leisure time rather
    than work. Tonight, while I was chopping melons and veggies and
    wrapping meat, I was watching the latest arrival from Netflix. Usually
    when I'm working in the kitchen, I have a DVD or audiobook going - I
    don't like just sitting and watching/listening. I cook when I feel
    like it, not because I have to. Actual meals take about 2 minutes to
    prepare here.

    But you do have to *like* cooking and baking to be this frugal.

    You also have to like the "game" of doing it on the cheap. I don't
    bother with coupons - they're almost always for name-brand prepared
    foods that cost too much even on sale. I just browse the ads that come
    in the mail and hit several stores and mostly buy loss-leader items.
    And I buy a few things in bulk - sometimes at the health food store
    downtown and sometimes online. I once figured it out and concluded I
    "earn" around $40/hour for the time I spend planning and doing my
    shopping this way. But it's not just about saivngs, it's about the
    "score" of hauling home a giant pile of food for the elast amount of
    money possible. I get real satisfaction from that.

    While I raise a good bit of food, it is definetly not work at ALL.
    Gardening is *absolutely* leisure time for me. I should count
    gardening costs under entertainment... or therapy... rather than as a
    food cost. ;)

    Looking at the Medifast site due to Caorl Ann's post got me thinking
    about all this. They want like $300 to sell one month's worth of food
    for a diabetic... for *one* person... and you still have to make a
    meat-and-veggie meal every day on your own dime on top of that. So
    that $300 didn't even cover one person's food for a month since you
    still have to buy groceries! I feed me and my husband full-time, my
    daughter part-time, four cats, 6 hens and maintain over a year's worth
    of food storage here for significantly less than what they charge for a
    *partial* diet for one person!

    What a great racket the weight-loss industry is. You get to charge
    people *more* money for *less* food. Really, when you think about
    it... that's what all these programs do... sell you a safe
    "weight-loss" portion of food at an outrageous price. It's sort of the
    opposite of an all-you-can-eat-buffet... it's an all-we-can-charge
    method of selling food. ;)
     
    Tags:


  2. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Wow....I read that!

    One thing is for sure, Jackie, you are NOT lazy! :)

    I'm impressed. Even the thought of doing this make my head spin! My answer
    is to eat simple and shop as much as possible at Sams. Of course, I'm only
    one person here.


    [email protected] wrote:
    :: Well, I do low-carb cheaply, but hubby does not low-carb at all, so
    :: the post is only partially about low-carbing frugally.
    ::
     
  3. Hannah Gruen

    Hannah Gruen Guest

    On 22 Apr 2006 00:17:05 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >I am *extremely* cheap when I shop. I went shopping today as a matter
    >of fact. I shop about every 10-12 days or so.


    Great post, Jackie!

    I'm with you on the coupons. The only ones I ever use are for toilet
    paper, pet food, soy milk, and occasionally toiletries. But I usually
    wait to use them until the item is already on sale.

    I did my shopping last night. Like you, I tend to rotate between a
    number of stores in the area. I look over the flyers, but tend to base
    where I shop on where I'm going that day, so I can combine a trip.

    I wish I had all your storage space! I have to shop weekly, or more
    often, because at the moment I have a teensy fridge, small amount of
    freezer and pantry space. I'm getting ready to move, though, and when
    that happens I can get a larger fridge/freezer and set up lots of
    pantry space. That really helps in taking advantage of the specials.
    And I'll have space for a kitchen garden, too, which not only saves
    money, but gives you the best tasting produce available.

    Last night I got a big pack of Perdue chicken leg quarters for
    $.59/lb. Tomorrow I'll put most of them in my Nesco slow-cooker along
    with a little water and herbs, onion, carrot, and celery.Chicken legs
    absolutely delicious cooked this way, and the bit of broth is a great
    sauce or soup base. I chill it and take the chicken fat layer off the
    top - it's wonderful for sauteeing. I don't remove any of the skin
    till after cooking, so I get that fat rendered off.

    Being flexible and buying what is on special really does cut way, way
    down on my spending. I can easily spend twice as much, or even more,
    if I don't pay attention to prices.

    HG
     
  4. MëreMalë

    MëreMalë Guest

    [email protected], ryetes
    >Well, I do low-carb cheaply, but hubby does not low-carb at all, so the
    >post is only partially about low-carbing frugally.
    >
    >I am *extremely* cheap when I shop. I went shopping today as a matter
    >of fact. I shop about every 10-12 days or so.
    >

    Ditto here, mainly because of logistics. Rural Australia isn't
    littered with Woolworths, contrary to popular thinking.

    >
    >While I raise a good bit of food, it is definetly not work at ALL.
    >Gardening is *absolutely* leisure time for me. I should count
    >gardening costs under entertainment... or therapy... rather than as a
    >food cost. ;)
    >

    Part of "on farm" work audit, here.

    >Looking at the Medifast site due to Caorl Ann's post got me thinking
    >about all this. They want like $300 to sell one month's worth of food
    >for a diabetic... for *one* person... and you still have to make a
    >meat-and-veggie meal every day on your own dime on top of that. So
    >that $300 didn't even cover one person's food for a month since you
    >still have to buy groceries! I feed me and my husband full-time, my
    >daughter part-time, four cats, 6 hens and maintain over a year's worth
    >of food storage here for significantly less than what they charge for a
    >*partial* diet for one person!
    >

    Oh, but you get a alum. foil container with each meal!

    >What a great racket the weight-loss industry is. You get to charge
    >people *more* money for *less* food. Really, when you think about
    >it... that's what all these programs do... sell you a safe
    >"weight-loss" portion of food at an outrageous price. It's sort of the
    >opposite of an all-you-can-eat-buffet... it's an all-we-can-charge
    >method of selling food. ;)
    >

    A case of "more for less" in actual success at weight loss too, I
    would offer?

    Great post Jacki. Has to take top shelf prize for this weeks
    read.
    Thanks.

    MM
     
  5. PhillyDude

    PhillyDude Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Well, I do low-carb cheaply, but hubby does not low-carb at all, so the>
    > post is only partially about low-carbing frugally.
    >


    My wife does not do Low Carb either. I find this to be a challenge
    sometimes, because the food she desires is a temptation to me.

    > I am *extremely* cheap when I shop. I went shopping today as a matter
    > of fact. I shop about every 10-12 days or so.
    >


    One thing about Low Carb eating that I've notice - feel free to correct me
    if I'm wrong - is that vegetables are your best friend. Having said that I
    feel a need to shop at least once a week for vegetables because they can go
    bad quicker than other foods that can be frozen. Also I HATE old fruit -
    gotta be fresh! IMHO

    Thanks
    -Phil
     
  6. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >

    <snip>
    >I spent $111 today. I'll probably wind up spending around $250 total
    > this month on food, including all the meals my husband eats on the road
    > (he's a truck driver), eating out and pet food.
    >

    <snip>
    > What a great racket the weight-loss industry is. You get to charge
    > people *more* money for *less* food. Really, when you think about
    > it... that's what all these programs do... sell you a safe
    > "weight-loss" portion of food at an outrageous price. It's sort of the
    > opposite of an all-you-can-eat-buffet... it's an all-we-can-charge
    > method of selling food. ;)
    >



    Wow! I'm impressed. I spent that much yesterday and only got a fraction of
    what you bought. Everything I bought was fresh food except for a jar of
    olives (nothing processed!), and it was all good food that fits within my
    diet, but I have found that it has been *more* expensive to eat healthy than
    what I spent in my junk food days. I obviously could learn a lot from you.
    On the other hand, I live in a very small town, and we have only a few
    groceries available unless I want to drive 35 miles (to another small town).
    Still, I fail to peruse ads, and I can see that is key to your success.

    I like your comment about the weight-loss industry. I do, at least, avoid
    all those programs -- originally for the reason you stated and now because I
    have found that I can eat better by preparing it for myself (even though I
    live alone and definitely am not "a cook" -- everything I prepare has to be
    quick and easy).

    Thanks for posting!

    MaryL
     
  7. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    "PhillyDude" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Well, I do low-carb cheaply, but hubby does not low-carb at all, so the>
    >> post is only partially about low-carbing frugally.
    >>

    >
    > My wife does not do Low Carb either. I find this to be a challenge
    > sometimes, because the food she desires is a temptation to me.
    >
    >> I am *extremely* cheap when I shop. I went shopping today as a matter
    >> of fact. I shop about every 10-12 days or so.
    >>

    >
    > One thing about Low Carb eating that I've notice - feel free to correct me
    > if I'm wrong - is that vegetables are your best friend. Having said that
    > I feel a need to shop at least once a week for vegetables because they can
    > go bad quicker than other foods that can be frozen. Also I HATE old
    > fruit - gotta be fresh! IMHO
    >
    > Thanks
    > -Phil
    >
    >


    This is one of the reasons why I have found that low-carb (or, more
    correctly, "lower"-carb in my case) has been expensive. I eat a great many
    fresh veggies and a considerable amount of fresh fruit -- and that means
    frequent shopping. Since I buy for one person, it has also meant a
    considerable amount of waste. I bought a vacuum sealer that I like for
    meats and leftovers, but I do not spend much time cooking (and there is the
    other reason for waste because I don't spend the time and effort that I know
    would make use of some of those products that now end up in the trash can).

    MaryL
     
  8. Hannah Gruen wrote:

    > I wish I had all your storage space! I have to shop weekly, or more
    > often, because at the moment I have a teensy fridge, small amount of
    > freezer and pantry space. I'm getting ready to move, though, and when
    > that happens I can get a larger fridge/freezer and set up lots of
    > pantry space. That really helps in taking advantage of the specials.
    > And I'll have space for a kitchen garden, too, which not only saves
    > money, but gives you the best tasting produce available.


    Yeah, storage space is crucial for me being as frugal as I manage to
    be. There's lots of stuff I see on sale and buy a year's worth of it
    at a time.

    > Being flexible and buying what is on special really does cut way, way
    > down on my spending. I can easily spend twice as much, or even more,
    > if I don't pay attention to prices.


    Agreed.

    I figure the folks who shop without paying attention are paying a big
    chunk of the cost for my groceries. ;)
     
  9. Roger Zoul wrote:

    > One thing is for sure, Jackie, you are NOT lazy! :)


    No, I really am. There are people out there who prepare 3 meals a day
    for their families. I would go nuts if I had to do that.

    The trick is to work within my own desires so it's not work. For me,
    shopping is time spent with my daughter. Cooking in big batches or
    doing food prep is something to do while I'm watching a movie. And
    gardening is a great pleasure in my life.

    The only "work" involved is the organizing and planning bits, and as
    noted, I make it a "game" or challenge. I get real pleasure out of
    buying something for significantly less than it has cost for the past 3
    months. I win!
     
  10. Susan

    Susan Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    [email protected] wrote:

    > I figure the folks who shop without paying attention are paying a big
    > chunk of the cost for my groceries. ;)
    >


    <*waving*>

    You can just thank me here!! :-D

    I easily spend 3-4X what you do for food per month. That includes
    groceries and restaurants.

    Actually, I pay close attention, though.

    Part of my added cost is that I'll only buy wild caught fish (Trader
    Joe's has decent prices for this) and non feedlot beef and dairy,
    organic produce. Some of our takeout meals cost less or equal to what I
    would make at home.


    Susan
     
  11. PhillyDude wrote:

    > My wife does not do Low Carb either. I find this to be a challenge
    > sometimes, because the food she desires is a temptation to me.


    It helps if they don't eat the stuff that is your absolute favorites.
    Luckily, hubby doesn't care about Ben and Jerry's coffee heath bar
    crunch - I'd be in trouble if that stuff were in my freezer.

    I think of hubby's food sort of how I think about cat food or chicken
    feed. I buy good stuff for them, healthy and appetizing, but it is not
    Jackie-food. I am not gonna eat his whole wheat bread or crackers
    anymore than I'm gonna eat cat food.

    > One thing about Low Carb eating that I've notice - feel free to correct me
    > if I'm wrong - is that vegetables are your best friend.


    ABSOLUTELY!

    I never liked veggies all that much years ago, except maybe corn,
    onions and tomatoes.

    But I get more and more passionate about them as time goes on. Tastes
    really do change on low-carb.

    > Having said that I
    > feel a need to shop at least once a week for vegetables because they can go
    > bad quicker than other foods that can be frozen. Also I HATE old fruit -
    > gotta be fresh! IMHO


    I buy a variety of fresh stuff, some of which "keeps" better than
    others, so I don't have to go quite that often.

    And I have frozen, dehydrated and root-cellared stuff on hand too to
    fill in the gaps. I have literally gallons upon gallons of homemade
    soups canned up with all sorts of veggies in 'em.

    But fresh produce is why I shop as often as I do. I have to have the
    stuff. I could cut our costs down even further if I quit buying so
    much fresh produce, especially in the winter, but it's worth it to me.
     
  12. MaryL wrote:

    > This is one of the reasons why I have found that low-carb (or, more
    > correctly, "lower"-carb in my case) has been expensive. I eat a great many
    > fresh veggies and a considerable amount of fresh fruit -- and that means
    > frequent shopping. Since I buy for one person, it has also meant a
    > considerable amount of waste. I bought a vacuum sealer that I like for
    > meats and leftovers, but I do not spend much time cooking (and there is the
    > other reason for waste because I don't spend the time and effort that I know
    > would make use of some of those products that now end up in the trash can).


    I *have* to chop stuff up before I put it away - salad ingredients and
    melon and such. Cause... otherwise it goes bad and winds up an
    extravagance rather than a good deal.

    If there's a tupperware of cucumbers or watermelon in the fridge and I
    want a snack, I'll have some. But... if there's a whole cucumber or a
    wrapped melon wedge, I tend to pass it by and have a spoon of peanut
    butter instead.

    I really *am* lazy, so I don't assume I'm gonna not be, but rather plan
    for the fact that when I want something to eat, I want it easy and
    fast.

    I feed scraps to my chickens, and then compost their waste for the
    garden, so nothing *really* gets wasted here since it turns into eggs,
    chicken meat, and more veggies.

    Knowing that makes it easier to do the chopping too... to know I only
    have to shred enough cabbage for the cole slaw recipe and can just
    fling the rest to the chickens and it isn't wasted. It means I can
    chop the easiest bits of the cabbage, so am less likely to postpone it
    and have the whole thing go bad on me.

    Another thing I do when there's space in the freezer is save veggie
    peelings for making stock out of. I can up the stock, and still feed
    the veggies into the chicken -> eggs -> compost cycle.
     
  13. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > MaryL wrote:
    >
    >> This is one of the reasons why I have found that low-carb (or, more
    >> correctly, "lower"-carb in my case) has been expensive. I eat a great
    >> many
    >> fresh veggies and a considerable amount of fresh fruit -- and that means
    >> frequent shopping. Since I buy for one person, it has also meant a
    >> considerable amount of waste. I bought a vacuum sealer that I like for
    >> meats and leftovers, but I do not spend much time cooking (and there is
    >> the
    >> other reason for waste because I don't spend the time and effort that I
    >> know
    >> would make use of some of those products that now end up in the trash
    >> can).

    >
    > I *have* to chop stuff up before I put it away - salad ingredients and
    > melon and such. Cause... otherwise it goes bad and winds up an
    > extravagance rather than a good deal.
    >
    > If there's a tupperware of cucumbers or watermelon in the fridge and I
    > want a snack, I'll have some. But... if there's a whole cucumber or a
    > wrapped melon wedge, I tend to pass it by and have a spoon of peanut
    > butter instead.
    >
    > I really *am* lazy, so I don't assume I'm gonna not be, but rather plan
    > for the fact that when I want something to eat, I want it easy and
    > fast.
    >
    > I feed scraps to my chickens, and then compost their waste for the
    > garden, so nothing *really* gets wasted here since it turns into eggs,
    > chicken meat, and more veggies.
    >
    > Knowing that makes it easier to do the chopping too... to know I only
    > have to shred enough cabbage for the cole slaw recipe and can just
    > fling the rest to the chickens and it isn't wasted. It means I can
    > chop the easiest bits of the cabbage, so am less likely to postpone it
    > and have the whole thing go bad on me.
    >
    > Another thing I do when there's space in the freezer is save veggie
    > peelings for making stock out of. I can up the stock, and still feed
    > the veggies into the chicken -> eggs -> compost cycle.
    >


    I like your ideas and already do some of them (cut up veggies for snacks,
    for example), but I almost never get around to making soup. That's
    something on my "to do" list because I love soup, it's good for me, and it
    would save a lot money! I live in town, so I can't throw scraps to the
    chickens and don't have a root cellar. I remember those things from my
    grandparents, though. They were farmers, and I used to marvel at the row
    after row of canned goods in the basement (even canned beef).

    Thanks for the tips. They're great -- and a good motivator to hear of what
    someone has actually accomplished.

    MaryL
     
  14. MaryL wrote:

    > I like your ideas and already do some of them (cut up veggies for snacks,
    > for example), but I almost never get around to making soup. That's
    > something on my "to do" list because I love soup, it's good for me, and it
    > would save a lot money!


    Google the group for the Italian sausage soup recipe. It's a good
    weekend project cause it only takes about 20-30 minutes to make, but
    then you let it cook 4+ hours.

    It's *so* good. Utterly yummy!
     
  15. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > MaryL wrote:
    >
    >> I like your ideas and already do some of them (cut up veggies for snacks,
    >> for example), but I almost never get around to making soup. That's
    >> something on my "to do" list because I love soup, it's good for me, and
    >> it
    >> would save a lot money!

    >
    > Google the group for the Italian sausage soup recipe. It's a good
    > weekend project cause it only takes about 20-30 minutes to make, but
    > then you let it cook 4+ hours.
    >
    > It's *so* good. Utterly yummy!
    >


    Thanks for the reminder! I had copied that recipe earlier, and it would be
    a good project for this weekend. I even bought a Rival Kitchen Kettle
    because it looked like a good way to make some soup for one person (with
    leftover to freeze).

    MaryL
     
  16. PhillyDude

    PhillyDude Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > MaryL wrote:
    >
    > I really *am* lazy, so I don't assume I'm gonna not be, but rather plan
    > for the fact that when I want something to eat, I want it easy and
    > fast.
    >


    From what you've posted, if your're lazy then there's no hope for me - LOL.

    -Phil
    230/227/170
     
  17. Susan

    Susan Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    PhillyDude wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>MaryL wrote:
    >>
    >>I really *am* lazy, so I don't assume I'm gonna not be, but rather plan
    >>for the fact that when I want something to eat, I want it easy and
    >>fast.
    >>

    >
    >
    > From what you've posted, if your're lazy then there's no hope for me - LOL.
    >
    > -Phil
    > 230/227/170


    I get what she means, though. People have always said I'm very
    organized and I guess it's true in a way, but I create order because
    otherwise I feel disorganized.

    But I *am* lazy; I buy stuff already cut up if it's organic and fresh.
    I buy big bags of prewashed organic baby greens for salad, washed and
    strung sugar snaps for snacks, etc. I need a 12 step program for Exotic
    Marinade and Condiment Dependence Disorder...

    Susan
     
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