Frustration

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Julianne, Oct 18, 2003.

  1. Julianne

    Julianne Guest

    I worked this week on two huge and exceptionally boring projects for two
    clients. Yesterday, I rose at 4:00 and worked until about 5:00 p.m. on the
    last one.

    As I was just about to leave my client's office, ready to finally relax, my
    client asks me to review something. He is being sued by a former patient
    because of a lost left leg. I was spent but I did read the charts and will
    read them in greater detail next week. Here is what is immediately
    apparent:

    The patient was admitted to home health services with a primary diagnosis of
    PVD and IDDM following a right below the knee amputation. The wound was not
    responding to treatment and the right amputation was revised to above the
    knee. Throughout the clinical record, there were references to the fact
    that the patient was non-compliant with his diabetic treatment and that he
    continued to smoke heavily.

    Up until the patient went into the hospital, there was no indication of any
    wound to the left foot. Upon discharge from the hospital, there were two
    areas of black tissue to the left ankle. At this point, they were
    photographed. The eschar eventually sloughed off revealing a stage III or
    IV pressure ulcer. Orders were continually revised, the MD was contacted
    frequently and in spite of everything, the patient did not respond to
    treatment. He continued to smoke and actually went AWOL from the hospital
    at one point to go smoke cigarettes.

    The last entry in the clinical record was yet another phone call to the
    vascular surgeon who wanted to see the patient in the afternoon. From
    there, the patient was put into the hospital and subsequently had his left
    leg amputated.

    The patient is now suing my client for loss of his left leg!!!!!!!

    Frankly, I don't know what kind of lawyer would take the case. In fact, the
    atty for the plaintiff has not even reviewed the clinical records. In
    Louisiana, hospitals and physicians have a process where three MD's must
    review the case before filing suit - one for the plaintiff, one for the
    defendant and one mutually agreeable to both - to determine if there is
    merit. Other health care providers are not a part of this process.

    So, here is my client with a totally bogus lawsuit but he is a small
    provider and will suffer the burden of legal fees, etc. Even if a counter
    suit is filed for legal fees, the plaintiff won't be able to pay them.

    And, I won't even tell you how badly I feel that the old joke about not
    having a leg to stand on keeps running uninvited through my thoughts.

    j
     
    Tags:


  2. Julianne wrote:

    > I worked this week on two huge and exceptionally boring projects for two
    > clients. Yesterday, I rose at 4:00 and worked until about 5:00 p.m. on the
    > last one.
    >
    > As I was just about to leave my client's office, ready to finally relax, my
    > client asks me to review something. He is being sued by a former patient
    > because of a lost left leg. I was spent but I did read the charts and will
    > read them in greater detail next week. Here is what is immediately
    > apparent:
    >
    > The patient was admitted to home health services with a primary diagnosis of
    > PVD and IDDM following a right below the knee amputation. The wound was not
    > responding to treatment and the right amputation was revised to above the
    > knee. Throughout the clinical record, there were references to the fact
    > that the patient was non-compliant with his diabetic treatment and that he
    > continued to smoke heavily.
    >
    > Up until the patient went into the hospital, there was no indication of any
    > wound to the left foot. Upon discharge from the hospital, there were two
    > areas of black tissue to the left ankle. At this point, they were
    > photographed. The eschar eventually sloughed off revealing a stage III or
    > IV pressure ulcer. Orders were continually revised, the MD was contacted
    > frequently and in spite of everything, the patient did not respond to
    > treatment. He continued to smoke and actually went AWOL from the hospital
    > at one point to go smoke cigarettes.
    >
    > The last entry in the clinical record was yet another phone call to the
    > vascular surgeon who wanted to see the patient in the afternoon. From
    > there, the patient was put into the hospital and subsequently had his left
    > leg amputated.
    >
    > The patient is now suing my client for loss of his left leg!!!!!!!
    >
    > Frankly, I don't know what kind of lawyer would take the case. In fact, the
    > atty for the plaintiff has not even reviewed the clinical records. In
    > Louisiana, hospitals and physicians have a process where three MD's must
    > review the case before filing suit - one for the plaintiff, one for the
    > defendant and one mutually agreeable to both - to determine if there is
    > merit. Other health care providers are not a part of this process.
    >
    > So, here is my client with a totally bogus lawsuit but he is a small
    > provider and will suffer the burden of legal fees, etc. Even if a counter
    > suit is filed for legal fees, the plaintiff won't be able to pay them.
    >


    Does your client not have malpractice insurance?

    >
    > And, I won't even tell you how badly I feel that the old joke about not
    > having a leg to stand on keeps running uninvited through my thoughts.
    >
    > j


    This is a good example of why malpractice insurance costs so much.

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/
     
  3. J,

    That really stinks! No wonder health care costs are so high.
    Patients have bad outcomes and they just look for someone to blame. In
    PA they now have a review board pass on a potential lawsuit before it
    can be filed, I believe.

    "Julianne" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I worked this week on two huge and exceptionally boring projects for two
    > clients. Yesterday, I rose at 4:00 and worked until about 5:00 p.m. on the
    > last one.
    >
    > As I was just about to leave my client's office, ready to finally relax, my
    > client asks me to review something. He is being sued by a former patient
    > because of a lost left leg. I was spent but I did read the charts and will
    > read them in greater detail next week. Here is what is immediately
    > apparent:
    >
    > The patient was admitted to home health services with a primary diagnosis of
    > PVD and IDDM following a right below the knee amputation. The wound was not
    > responding to treatment and the right amputation was revised to above the
    > knee. Throughout the clinical record, there were references to the fact
    > that the patient was non-compliant with his diabetic treatment and that he
    > continued to smoke heavily.
    >
    > Up until the patient went into the hospital, there was no indication of any
    > wound to the left foot. Upon discharge from the hospital, there were two
    > areas of black tissue to the left ankle. At this point, they were
    > photographed. The eschar eventually sloughed off revealing a stage III or
    > IV pressure ulcer. Orders were continually revised, the MD was contacted
    > frequently and in spite of everything, the patient did not respond to
    > treatment. He continued to smoke and actually went AWOL from the hospital
    > at one point to go smoke cigarettes.
    >
    > The last entry in the clinical record was yet another phone call to the
    > vascular surgeon who wanted to see the patient in the afternoon. From
    > there, the patient was put into the hospital and subsequently had his left
    > leg amputated.
    >
    > The patient is now suing my client for loss of his left leg!!!!!!!
    >
    > Frankly, I don't know what kind of lawyer would take the case. In fact, the
    > atty for the plaintiff has not even reviewed the clinical records. In
    > Louisiana, hospitals and physicians have a process where three MD's must
    > review the case before filing suit - one for the plaintiff, one for the
    > defendant and one mutually agreeable to both - to determine if there is
    > merit. Other health care providers are not a part of this process.
    >
    > So, here is my client with a totally bogus lawsuit but he is a small
    > provider and will suffer the burden of legal fees, etc. Even if a counter
    > suit is filed for legal fees, the plaintiff won't be able to pay them.
    >
    > And, I won't even tell you how badly I feel that the old joke about not
    > having a leg to stand on keeps running uninvited through my thoughts.
    >
    > j
     
  4. On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 08:28:20 -0500, "Julianne" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >The patient was admitted to home health services with a primary diagnosis of
    >PVD and IDDM following a right below the knee amputation. The wound was not
    >responding to treatment and the right amputation was revised to above the
    >knee. Throughout the clinical record, there were references to the fact
    >that the patient was non-compliant with his diabetic treatment and that he
    >continued to smoke heavily.
    >
    >Up until the patient went into the hospital, there was no indication of any
    >wound to the left foot. Upon discharge from the hospital, there were two
    >areas of black tissue to the left ankle. At this point, they were
    >photographed. The eschar eventually sloughed off revealing a stage III or
    >IV pressure ulcer. Orders were continually revised, the MD was contacted
    >frequently and in spite of everything, the patient did not respond to
    >treatment. He continued to smoke and actually went AWOL from the hospital
    >at one point to go smoke cigarettes.
    >
    >The last entry in the clinical record was yet another phone call to the
    >vascular surgeon who wanted to see the patient in the afternoon. From
    >there, the patient was put into the hospital and subsequently had his left
    >leg amputated.
    >
    >The patient is now suing my client for loss of his left leg!!!!!!!
    >
    >Frankly, I don't know what kind of lawyer would take the case.


    One that knows the legal process is always best served by proper
    counsel on both sides regardless of the case. Think defending a known
    murderer.

    >So, here is my client with a totally bogus lawsuit but he is a small
    >provider and will suffer the burden of legal fees, etc. Even if a counter
    >suit is filed for legal fees, the plaintiff won't be able to pay them.


    Yes, as a multiple, small business owner, factoring legal fees into
    the capital equation is a reality.

    >And, I won't even tell you how badly I feel that the old joke about not
    >having a leg to stand on keeps running uninvited through my thoughts.


    Well, it is funny.

    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap031011.html
    Lift well, Eat less, Walk fast, Live long.
     
  5. this is ridiculous! this is one of the reasons why so many people can't
    afford any health insurance.
     
  6. Julianne

    Julianne Guest

    "M_un Over Seattle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 08:28:20 -0500, "Julianne" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >The patient was admitted to home health services with a primary diagnosis

    of
    > >PVD and IDDM following a right below the knee amputation. The wound was

    not
    > >responding to treatment and the right amputation was revised to above the
    > >knee. Throughout the clinical record, there were references to the fact
    > >that the patient was non-compliant with his diabetic treatment and that

    he
    > >continued to smoke heavily.
    > >
    > >Up until the patient went into the hospital, there was no indication of

    any
    > >wound to the left foot. Upon discharge from the hospital, there were two
    > >areas of black tissue to the left ankle. At this point, they were
    > >photographed. The eschar eventually sloughed off revealing a stage III

    or
    > >IV pressure ulcer. Orders were continually revised, the MD was contacted
    > >frequently and in spite of everything, the patient did not respond to
    > >treatment. He continued to smoke and actually went AWOL from the

    hospital
    > >at one point to go smoke cigarettes.
    > >
    > >The last entry in the clinical record was yet another phone call to the
    > >vascular surgeon who wanted to see the patient in the afternoon. From
    > >there, the patient was put into the hospital and subsequently had his

    left
    > >leg amputated.
    > >
    > >The patient is now suing my client for loss of his left leg!!!!!!!
    > >
    > >Frankly, I don't know what kind of lawyer would take the case.

    >
    > One that knows the legal process is always best served by proper
    > counsel on both sides regardless of the case. Think defending a known
    > murderer.


    Yes, and thankfully I have relationships with atty's who are genuinely
    interested in patient well-being. The atty I like best is one that can
    gently convince a provider that they need to re-visit policie, procedures,
    etc. and not just in writing. He agreed to take this case.


    > >So, here is my client with a totally bogus lawsuit but he is a small
    > >provider and will suffer the burden of legal fees, etc. Even if a

    counter
    > >suit is filed for legal fees, the plaintiff won't be able to pay them.

    >
    > Yes, as a multiple, small business owner, factoring legal fees into
    > the capital equation is a reality.
    >


    A reality, yes. Fair? I think not.

    > >And, I won't even tell you how badly I feel that the old joke about not
    > >having a leg to stand on keeps running uninvited through my thoughts.

    >
    > Well, it is funny.


    I will regain my sense of humor when all of this over!

    j
    >
    > http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap031011.html
    > Lift well, Eat less, Walk fast, Live long.
     
  7. Julianne

    Julianne Guest

    B-I-N-G-O!


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > this is ridiculous! this is one of the reasons why so many people can't
    > afford any health insurance.
     
  8. Phil Holman

    Phil Holman Guest

    "Julianne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "M_un Over Seattle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 08:28:20 -0500, "Julianne"

    <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >The patient was admitted to home health services with a primary

    diagnosis
    > of
    > > >PVD and IDDM following a right below the knee amputation. The

    wound was
    > not
    > > >responding to treatment and the right amputation was revised to

    above the
    > > >knee. Throughout the clinical record, there were references to the

    fact
    > > >that the patient was non-compliant with his diabetic treatment and

    that
    > he
    > > >continued to smoke heavily.
    > > >
    > > >Up until the patient went into the hospital, there was no

    indication of
    > any
    > > >wound to the left foot. Upon discharge from the hospital, there

    were two
    > > >areas of black tissue to the left ankle. At this point, they were
    > > >photographed. The eschar eventually sloughed off revealing a stage

    III
    > or
    > > >IV pressure ulcer. Orders were continually revised, the MD was

    contacted
    > > >frequently and in spite of everything, the patient did not respond

    to
    > > >treatment. He continued to smoke and actually went AWOL from the

    > hospital
    > > >at one point to go smoke cigarettes.
    > > >
    > > >The last entry in the clinical record was yet another phone call to

    the
    > > >vascular surgeon who wanted to see the patient in the afternoon.

    From
    > > >there, the patient was put into the hospital and subsequently had

    his
    > left
    > > >leg amputated.
    > > >
    > > >The patient is now suing my client for loss of his left leg!!!!!!!
    > > >
    > > >Frankly, I don't know what kind of lawyer would take the case.

    > >
    > > One that knows the legal process is always best served by proper
    > > counsel on both sides regardless of the case. Think defending a

    known
    > > murderer.

    >
    > Yes, and thankfully I have relationships with atty's who are genuinely
    > interested in patient well-being. The atty I like best is one that

    can
    > gently convince a provider that they need to re-visit policie,

    procedures,
    > etc. and not just in writing. He agreed to take this case.
    >
    >
    > > >So, here is my client with a totally bogus lawsuit but he is a

    small
    > > >provider and will suffer the burden of legal fees, etc. Even if a

    > counter
    > > >suit is filed for legal fees, the plaintiff won't be able to pay

    them.
    > >
    > > Yes, as a multiple, small business owner, factoring legal fees into
    > > the capital equation is a reality.
    > >

    >
    > A reality, yes. Fair? I think not.
    >
    > > >And, I won't even tell you how badly I feel that the old joke

    about not
    > > >having a leg to stand on keeps running uninvited through my

    thoughts.
    > >
    > > Well, it is funny.

    >
    > I will regain my sense of humor when all of this over!


    You can apply this to anyone with both legs. Start off on the right foot
    when putting your best foot forward and you won't have a leg to stand
    on. Mixed metaphors, you gotta love em.

    Phil Holman
     
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