FTP testing and HR response



doulos

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Apr 22, 2007
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I posted this on Wattage and got no replies. Hope someone can help.

For those with significant testing experience what does an acceptable
HR as a %max or %AT profile look like for what you would consider a
good effort during an FTP test?

Thanks Tim
 

Alex Simmons

Active Member
Mar 12, 2006
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doulos said:
I posted this on Wattage and got no replies. Hope someone can help.

For those with significant testing experience what does an acceptable
HR as a %max or %AT profile look like for what you would consider a
good effort during an FTP test?

Thanks Tim
I'm not surprised there was no response. Does anyone still wear a HR strap anymore?

If you're doing a FTP test, then what does it matter? You either went as hard as you could and paced well, or you didn't. Your HR won't tell you either of those. Look at what the power meter tells you.
 

doulos

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Apr 22, 2007
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Thanks Alex. I expected that but was still trying to figure if HR data is useful at all, either on the road or in the post ride analysis.Appreciate your thoughts,
Tim
 

frenchyge

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Apr 3, 2005
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doulos said:
I expected that but was still trying to figure if HR data is useful at all, either on the road or in the post ride analysis.
It may have its uses, but I wouldn't consider pacing an FTP-test effort to be one of them.
 

Alex Simmons

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Mar 12, 2006
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Just to provide a practical example or two of how it would be really difficult to use HR to guide pacing. I doubt I have an example I can easily track down of a session where HR was held steady to see what happens to power - but I think you can work out what would happen....

Here is an image of power (yellow) vs HR (red) during a 2 x 20min interval session:

TTWorkout.jpg



Here is an image of the same thing during an hour long hard tempo session:

TempoWorkout.jpg
 

wiredued

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Aug 17, 2004
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I use HR to pace indoor 3x20s I haven't used it to pace a 1 hour TT but my average was 162bpm when I was done. This leads me to believe 163bpm is my threshold HR and 164bpm is above threshold my MHR is 185bpm age early 40s. Some days my legs won't let me pace by HR it is a fuzzy guide.



doulos said:
I posted this on Wattage and got no replies. Hope someone can help.

For those with significant testing experience what does an acceptable
HR as a %max or %AT profile look like for what you would consider a
good effort during an FTP test?

Thanks Tim
 

The Flash!

New Member
Dec 9, 2006
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Alex Simmons said:
Just to provide a practical example or two of how it would be really difficult to use HR to guide pacing. I doubt I have an example I can easily track down of a session where HR was held steady to see what happens to power - but I think you can work out what would happen....

Here is an image of power (yellow) vs HR (red) during a 2 x 20min interval session:

TTWorkout.jpg



Here is an image of the same thing during an hour long hard tempo session:

TempoWorkout.jpg
Alex....nice pacing on those intervals! That's the way to use power....start off a little below and finish strong....
 

edd

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Jul 8, 2003
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doulos said:
I posted this on Wattage and got no replies. Hope someone can help.

For those with significant testing experience what does an acceptable
HR as a %max or %AT profile look like for what you would consider a
good effort during an FTP test?

Thanks Tim

… I don't know my FTP (will know soon) However if an average for a 1 hr TT will give you your FTP then the equivalent in HR would approx. 86-88% of MHR. This fairly arbitrary as MHR really needs to be found by going there and even then will vary as you age and as fitness levels change.

… according to the 220 less your age nonsense this for me would be more like 95% of MHR
 

sugaken

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Mar 27, 2006
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edd said:
if an average for a 1 hr TT will give you your FTP then the equivalent in HR would approx. 86-88% of MHR.
The problem is that it's highly individual, varying from person to person, not to mention other variables that influence HR (such as the drift Alex beautifully illustrated above). If HR were that concrete and stable an indicator for exercise intensity, we wouldn't need power meters in the first place.

Ken
 

edd

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Jul 8, 2003
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sugaken said:
The problem is that it's highly individual, varying from person to person, not to mention other variables that influence HR (such as the drift Alex beautifully illustrated above). If HR were that concrete and stable an indicator for exercise intensity, we wouldn't need power meters in the first place.

Ken

yep … that is for sure.

I did say it was arbitrary and approx.