Full carbon bike for racing?



drPD

New Member
Jul 19, 2007
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Ok, I am thinking about to buy a new bike that could be for racing.
rolleyes.gif


I am thinking about Fuji Team (full carbon) or Cannondale CAAD9 105 (alu).

In many posts I read that full carbon bikes are not good for racing and it sholud be better use alu bikes.
On the other side the Fuji Team are desingned as "racing machine".

I would like to use the bike for local racing and sprint triatlons.

I would like to hear you who have experience in road racing. Please comment this.

Best Regards,
PD.
smile.gif

 

Scotty_Dog

Member
Jul 30, 2004
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Everyone here prefers carbon fiber, titanium, aluminum, steel, magnesium, ???? alloy, and bamboo. And before you or anyone else asks, yes, I have been nominated to speak for everyone.

You should purchase the bike that you like best, whatever the material.
 

jhuskey

Moderator
Oct 6, 2003
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Scotty_Dog said:
Everyone here prefers carbon fiber, titanium, aluminum, steel, magnesium, ???? alloy, and bamboo. And before you or anyone else asks, yes, I have been nominated to speak for everyone.

You should purchase the bike that you like best, whatever the material.


What about Chrom-Moly?
 

Scotty_Dog

Member
Jul 30, 2004
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jhuskey said:
What about Chrom-Moly?
Sorry, but only dorks and mommas boys ride on chrom-moly.:D

Chromium molybdenum falls into both the "steel" and "???? alloy" categories listed above.
 

jhuskey

Moderator
Oct 6, 2003
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Scotty_Dog said:
Sorry, but only dorks and mommas boys ride on chrom-moly.:D

Chromium molybdenum falls into both the "steel" and "???? alloy" categories listed above.


I know but I wanted to add to the confusion but I did ride one in the 80's and wasn't a mommas boy.

Edit: I probably was considered a dork since people that wore Lycra back then were especially wierd specimens of humanity.
 

Andatura Veloce

New Member
Aug 13, 2007
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Scotty_Dog said:
You should purchase the bike that you like best, whatever the material.


Yes, I agree with Scotty_Dog. Go to your LBS and try out a few carbon and a few bikes that are aluminum.. Just decide for yourself. It's all personal preference I guess.
 

drPD

New Member
Jul 19, 2007
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Now I have a steel bike that have 27 lbs weigth. Yes, it is on an heavy side.
eek.gif


I prefare to do triathlon but a few of my frends ask me to try road race.
rolleyes.gif


I would like to have a new bike with less lbs.
biggrin.gif
I am considering between Fuji Team and Cannondale CAAD9 but the funny thing is that the Fuji cost less here 400 USD than CAAD9.
smile.gif


I am 41 year old and I am not professional racer.

Any suggestion from you is appreciated.

Best Regards,
PD.
 

Andatura Veloce

New Member
Aug 13, 2007
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drPD said:
Now I have a steel bike that have 27 lbs weigth. Yes, it is on an heavy side.
eek.gif


I prefare to do triathlon but a few of my frends ask me to try road race.
rolleyes.gif


I would like to have a new bike with less lbs.
biggrin.gif
I am considering between Fuji Team and Cannondale CAAD9 but the funny thing is that the Fuji cost less here 400 USD than CAAD9.
smile.gif


I am 41 year old and I am not professional racer.

Any suggestion from you is appreciated.

Best Regards,
PD.
Have you tested both these bikes out yet? If not, I would go and give them a ride. If money is not an issue, I would defiantly go with the Cannondale CAAD9, just because I have experienced great results with some Cannondale bikes. However, go to your shop, and ask around about the two bikes and find out more information and such!
smile.gif
 

sogood

New Member
Aug 24, 2006
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On equal basis b/n the two, the key consideration with CF bikes for racing falls with the fact that you need to be prepared for damage and cost of replacement. If you can afford it, then go for CF.
 

Jessinspain

New Member
Aug 24, 2007
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Not too long ago I got a full carbon bike, even the wheels. The only thing that is not Carbon is the seatpost due to problems a while ago with one. I race all over Europe with it, the ride is smooth and stiff, I love it. My bike weights only 6900 grams with the alloy seat post and some heavy pedals that I do not know why I cannot live without. Go Carbon, you won’t regret it
 

doctorSpoc

Member
Nov 18, 2005
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there is nothing wrong with carbon for racing... did anyone actually give you a reason... why carbon is bad for racing. if you crash aluminum as hard as it takes to crack a carbon fram the aluminum bike would almost 100% be toast too. i've race the same carbon frame for the last 4 years and no problems.

a bike that might be good for a tri - road racing combo might be the cervelo soloist

md.jpg


2 grand with ultegra http://www.racycles.com/CerveloSoloistTeamUltegraBike-idv-5943-255.html
 

Frigo's Luggage

New Member
Sep 16, 2006
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No, no, no. The big difference between these two bikes has nothing to do with the material. It is the geometry. The Cannondale has quick and lively handling. It is made for crits and is pretty agressive. The Fuji has more of a road racing geometry, doesn't turn as quick but is more comfortable on long rides.

Does anybody have a good article that explains geometry? I think it is overlooked far too often.
 

Sikhandar

New Member
Jul 5, 2007
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Frigo's Luggage said:
No, no, no. The big difference between these two bikes has nothing to do with the material. It is the geometry. The Cannondale has quick and lively handling. It is made for crits and is pretty agressive. The Fuji has more of a road racing geometry, doesn't turn as quick but is more comfortable on long rides.

Does anybody have a good article that explains geometry? I think it is overlooked far too often.
Well, of course the most important thing is the SIZE and if it fits to you comfortably. A superslooping giant in aluminium can be more comfortable than a sistem six oversized. I suggest a biomechanical visit. Then, the material is not that influent: here amateurs have 70% carbon fiber frames and a good 30% aluminium (ah ok 1% titanium + steel); carbon tends to crack with time (sooner or later....), so I'm preferring alu (the weight is comparable, a good easton alu frame is 1050 g, a bad carbon taiwan can be 1150...)