Fundraising on a bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Richard Bates, Jan 26, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    using a bike?

    My challenge is to raise £250.

    Love and ideas from Rich xx

    --
    Two cannibals eating a clown. One says to the other, "Does this taste funny to you?" To reply
    replace the obvious bit with "richard"
     
    Tags:


  2. M Series

    M Series Guest

    How about a sponsored roller ride. Your friends/ sponsors can come along to see how you are doing,
    not weather dependent either. Get a local shop involved and do it in their premises. Maybe have a
    'guess the distance (that you would have) pedalled in x hours'.

    Where are you based Richard ?

    "Richard Bates" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    > using a bike?
    >
    > My challenge is to raise £250.
    >
    > Love and ideas from Rich xx
    >
    > --
    > Two cannibals eating a clown. One says to the other, "Does this taste funny to you?" To reply
    > replace the obvious bit with "richard"
     
  3. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    > Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    > using a bike?

    Does doing the monopoly board count as a sponsored cycle ride? Probably. Never mind. Doing it from
    Cambridge, visiting all the places in order took about 180 miles. Never found anybody to join me on
    a repeat though...

    cheers, clive
     
  4. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, M Series <[email protected]> wrote:
    > How about a sponsored roller ride. Your friends/ sponsors can come along to see how you are doing,
    > not weather dependent either. Get a local shop involved and do it in their premises. Maybe have a
    > 'guess the distance (that you would have) pedalled in x hours'.

    Do it in a supermarket foyer and get them to double the money which you raise. Big publicity for
    them and loadsa cash for your charity - it will only work once however. In you publicity say that
    you will attempt to cycle 500 times round the supermarket in a certain time which will limit the
    supermarkets donation but will still produce a healthy return.

    Almost on topic. Last October the Scottish Motor Neurone Disease(?) Association did a sponsored
    cycle/walk on Cumbrae - they raised over £6,000 on one day.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village
     
  5. On Tue, 14 Jan 2003 11:02:19 +0100, Jeremy Parker <[email protected]> in
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>
    >> Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    >> using a bike?

    >Become a bike courier? Or is the object that someone else, rather than you, donate the money to
    >this undefined recipient. If the cause,

    There is no reason why it couldn't be both myself and other people who wish to support. Seeing as
    you have subtly hinted that you would like to know who the beneficiary is, I will tell you: It is
    Birmingham Childrens' Hospital, which is also my employer.

    >whatever it is, is good enough that you feel that somebody ought to give money to it, why not ask
    >them directly, rather than confusing the issue with pursuing your hobby at the same time, and
    >proclaiming that your hobby is so unpleasant that you have to be paid to do it

    I would not have to be proclaiming that my hobby is unpleasant: possibly the opposite. As an
    example, last year, a group of keen ballroom dancers organised a dinner dance, inviting some well
    known couples from the "dance world". This appealed sufficiently to other enthusiatic dancers and
    spectators (Come Dancing viewers?) within the hospital, that they purchased tickets to the event.
    Profits from the evening mounted to £6,500. I don't believe that the evening would have been
    successful if the organisers had taken the attitude "I hate dancing so please pay me to do it and
    I'll give the money to charity".

    So potentially there are ways of raising money using cycling in an enthusiastic way - but my ideas
    of how are few. Hance the original post asking for suggestions.

    Love and crossed fingers from Rich xx

    --
    Two fish suddenly swim into a brick wall. Damn! To reply put only the word "richard" before
    the @ sign
     
  6. On Sun, 12 Jan 2003 18:57:56 +0000, Richard Bates did issue forth:

    > Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    > using a bike?

    Sell the bike! ;-)

    --
    Huw Pritchard | Replace bounce with huw | to reply by mail | www.secretworldgovernment.org
     
  7. > Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    > using a bike?
    >
    > My challenge is to raise £250.

    Become a bike courier? Or is the object that someone else, rather than you, donate the money to
    this undefined recipient. If the cause, whatever it is, is good enough that you feel that somebody
    ought to give money to it, why not ask them directly, rather than confusing the issue with pursuing
    your hobby at the same time, and proclaiming that your hobby is so unpleasant that you have to be
    paid to do it

    Jeremy Parker
     
  8. In message <[email protected]>, Richard Bates
    <[email protected]> writes
    >Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    >using a bike?

    Get 50 people (all your mates plus work-mates etc.) to dig out the old bikes from their garage and
    follow you round a nice course. Say, to the botanical gardens for a cup of tea. Paying £5 each for
    the privilege, of course. And even more if the bikes need attention first - just bring your
    jackhammer and HPX pump.

    Call it a "Critical Mass"? Get some enthusiasm going!

    >
    >My challenge is to raise £250.
    >
    >Love and ideas from Rich xx
    >

    --
    Richard Keatinge

    http://www.keatinge.net
     
  9. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 12 Jan 2003 18:57:56 +0000, Richard Bates
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    >using a bike? My challenge is to raise £250.

    No problem - every time you think of going to the bike shop, put the fifty quid in a tin instead :-D

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  10. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Richard Bates" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 14 Jan 2003 11:02:19 +0100, Jeremy Parker <[email protected]> in
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >>
    > >> Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    > >> using a bike?
    >
    > >Become a bike courier? Or is the object that someone else, rather than you, donate the money to
    > >this undefined recipient. If the cause,
    >
    > There is no reason why it couldn't be both myself and other people who wish to support. Seeing as
    > you have subtly hinted that you would like to know who the beneficiary is, I will tell you: It is
    > Birmingham Childrens' Hospital, which is also my employer.
    >
    > >whatever it is, is good enough that you feel that somebody ought to give money to it, why not ask
    > >them directly, rather than confusing the issue with pursuing your hobby at the same time, and
    > >proclaiming that your hobby is so unpleasant that you have to be paid to do it
    >
    > I would not have to be proclaiming that my hobby is unpleasant: possibly the opposite. As an
    > example, last year, a group of keen ballroom dancers organised a dinner dance, inviting some well
    > known couples from the "dance world". This appealed sufficiently to other enthusiatic dancers and
    > spectators (Come Dancing viewers?) within the hospital, that they purchased tickets to the event.
    > Profits from the evening mounted to £6,500. I don't believe that the evening would have been
    > successful if the organisers had taken the attitude "I hate dancing so please pay me to do it and
    > I'll give the money to charity".
    >
    > So potentially there are ways of raising money using cycling in an enthusiastic way - but my ideas
    > of how are few. Hance the original post asking for suggestions.
    >
    > Love and crossed fingers from Rich xx
    >
    > --
    > Two fish suddenly swim into a brick wall. Damn! To reply put only the word "richard" before
    > the @ sign

    ...er...don't s'pose you could abseil on a bike ??... not very helpful, sorry... Dave. good luck,
    very worthy cause.
    p.s. - I saw fire-fighters in Cornwall last year doing a sponsored row in the town centre. They had
    a few rowing machines that recorded distance and were challenging passers-by to races. They
    raised cash from the challenges and from sponsorship for the overall distances rowed. Variation
    on a theme and interactive with the local community, raising awareness of worthy causes etc. -
    Swap rowing machines for bikes/trainers and you're away....it's a thought anyway.
     
  11. "Richard Bates" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 14 Jan 2003 11:02:19 +0100, Jeremy Parker <[email protected]> in
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >>
    > >> Apart from the obvious sponsored cycle ride, any sugestion on how to raise money for a charity,
    > >> using a bike?
    >
    > >Become a bike courier? Or is the object that someone else, rather than you, donate the money to
    > >this undefined recipient. If the cause,
    >
    > There is no reason why it couldn't be both myself and other people who wish to support. Seeing as
    > you have subtly hinted that you would like to know who the beneficiary is, I will tell you: It is
    > Birmingham Childrens' Hospital, which is also my employer.
    >
    What if you get two bikes set up on rollers on a Saturday somewhere near the hospital where you can
    find passers-by, and have a challenge: £1 to see if they can 'go further' than you in ten minutes,
    and if they do, they don't have to pay the £1, but you have sponsors to pay it for you (up to some
    maximum, I guess), otherwise the passer-by pays.

    And of course, they're most likely to donate anyway.

    I hope I explained reasonably clearly. It might be a fun idea.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...