funny thing I saw

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Claire Petersky, Feb 14, 2003.

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  1. The other day I was riding with my husband to work. He needed to be in by a particular time for a
    meeting he had, and we were already late, so the plan was to hammer like hell, and make a certain
    bus at a freeway flyer stop so he could get in on time.

    So we ride as hard as could, and we made to the stop with some time to spare. Now, my husband is a
    total sweatbox, just drips even after a short light ride, so you can imagine what he was like when
    we got to the bus stop. He stripped to the waist, so all he had on top was the straps of his bib
    shorts (he still had on his tights etc. on the bottom half). Ok, it was a cold and frosty winter
    morning, so here he was, *steaming* at the bus stop. It looked like he was completely enveloped in
    his self-generated mist. I never saw anything so funny in my life. If you didn't know better, you'd
    think he was on fire or something. I couldn't stop laughing!

    Just after we loaded the bikes on the rack, he put on a fresh t-shirt he wears on buses to make
    himself decent and to try to hold in his effluvia, and the effect was gone.

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky [email protected] http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Bicycle_Meditations.htm
     
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  2. >Ok, it was a cold and frosty winter morning, so here he was, *steaming* at the bus stop. It looked
    >like he was completely enveloped in his self-generated mist. I never saw anything so funny in my
    >life. If you didn't know better, you'd think he was on fire or something. I couldn't stop laughing!

    i have steam coming off my head in some weather. it is rather amusing.
     
  3. [email protected] (Claire Petersky) spake thusly on or about Fri, 14 Feb 2003 19:14:29 UTC

    -> Ok, it was a cold and frosty winter morning, so here he -> was, *steaming* at the bus stop. It
    looked like he was completely -> enveloped in his self-generated mist. I never saw anything so funny
    in -> my life. If you didn't know better, you'd think he was on fire or -> something. I couldn't
    stop laughing! ->

    ok Claire never go anywhere without some kind of camera.

    --
    I hurt before the ride so fibro gives me a head start on the rest of the pack. silver lining?
    [email protected]
     
  4. On Fri, 14 Feb 2003 14:14:29 -0500, Claire Petersky wrote:

    > The other day I was riding with my husband to work. He needed to be in by a particular time for a
    > meeting he had, and we were already late, so the plan was to hammer like hell, and make a certain
    > bus at a freeway flyer stop so he could get in on time.
    >
    > So we ride as hard as could, and we made to the stop with some time to spare. Now, my husband is a
    > total sweatbox, just drips even after a short light ride, so you can imagine what he was like when
    > we got to the bus stop. He stripped to the waist, so all he had on top was the straps of his bib
    > shorts (he still had on his tights etc. on the bottom half). Ok, it was a cold and frosty winter
    > morning, so here he was, *steaming* at the bus stop. It looked like he was completely enveloped in
    > his self-generated mist. I never saw anything so funny in my life. If you didn't know better,
    > you'd think he was on fire or something. I couldn't stop laughing!

    Sort of like this:
    <http://www.masters-of-photography.com/images/full/stieglitz/stieglitz_terminal.jpg> which you may
    remember as one of the most famous photographic images of all time...
     
  5. Patrick Lamb

    Patrick Lamb Guest

    Claire Petersky wrote:
    > The other day I was riding with my husband to work. He needed to be in by a particular time for a
    > meeting he had, and we were already late, so the plan was to hammer like hell, and make a certain
    > bus at a freeway flyer stop so he could get in on time.
    >
    > So we ride as hard as could, and we made to the stop with some time to spare. Now, my husband is a
    > total sweatbox, just drips even after a short light ride, so you can imagine what he was like when
    > we got to the bus stop. He stripped to the waist, so all he had on top was the straps of his bib
    > shorts (he still had on his tights etc. on the bottom half). Ok, it was a cold and frosty winter
    > morning, so here he was, *steaming* at the bus stop. It looked like he was completely enveloped in
    > his self-generated mist. I never saw anything so funny in my life. If you didn't know better,
    > you'd think he was on fire or something. I couldn't stop laughing!

    Some years ago, I took my boots off while hiking. The first was steaming just like you described, so
    I got the camera out before taking off the second. We were heating up that trail!

    Pat
    --
    Apologies to those easily confused. Address is spam-resistant. Correct email address like pdlamb
    'round-about comcast point net.
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Luigi de
    Guzman) wrote:

    > >Ok, it was a cold and frosty winter morning, so here he was, *steaming* at the bus stop. It
    > >looked like he was completely enveloped in his self-generated mist. I never saw anything so funny
    > >in my life. If you didn't know better, you'd think he was on fire or something. I couldn't stop
    > >laughing!
    >
    > i have steam coming off my head in some weather. it is rather amusing.

    I have had the experience of having my vision momentarily cloud over, and then realizing it was
    steam coming from my face and head.

    Sweaty in Vancouver,

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  7. So my wife and I just got back yesterday from a weekend in Portland, Oregon; now that is a bike
    riding town! I have read that they may actually be the best, well it has our vote.

    It poured down rain for the entire 3 days that we were there, and we saw more bike riders in those 3
    days than 6 months of sunny days in Southern California. I don't know the statistics, but I would
    say that 20-30% of the people downtown ride to work; bravo Portland.

    Michael
     
  8. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 18 Feb 2003 16:35:51 -0800, <[email protected]>,
    Michael James Anderson <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >So my wife and I just got back yesterday from a weekend in Portland, Oregon; now that is a bike
    >riding town! I have read that they may actually be the best, well it has our vote.
    >
    >It poured down rain for the entire 3 days that we were there, and we saw more bike riders in those
    >3 days than 6 months of sunny days in Southern California. I don't know the statistics, but I would
    >say that 20-30% of the people downtown ride to work; bravo Portland.
    >
    >Michael

    Best estimates show bicycling to make up about 3.3 percent of all trips in the inner, urbanized
    parts of Portland. In the city as a whole, bicycle use is estimated at two percent of trips.

    There's higher mode split for bicycling (3.3 percent) in areas with: good street continuity,
    sidewalks, easy street crossings, and gentle topography. Much of inner Portland (i.e., west of I-205
    to the west hills) is characterized by such conditions.
    --
    zk
     
  9. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Tue, 18 Feb 2003 16:35:51 -0800, <[email protected]>,
    > Michael James Anderson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >So my wife and I just got back yesterday from a weekend in Portland, Oregon; now that is a bike
    > >riding town! I have read that they may actually be the best, well it has our vote.
    > >
    > >It poured down rain for the entire 3 days that we were there, and we saw more bike riders in
    > >those 3 days than 6 months of sunny days in Southern California. I don't know the statistics, but
    > >I would say that 20-30% of the people downtown ride to work; bravo Portland.
    > >
    > >Michael
    >
    > Best estimates show bicycling to make up about 3.3 percent of all trips in the inner, urbanized
    > parts of Portland. In the city as a whole, bicycle use is estimated at two percent of trips.
    >
    > There's higher mode split for bicycling (3.3 percent) in areas with: good street continuity,
    > sidewalks, easy street crossings, and gentle topography. Much of inner Portland (i.e., west of
    > I-205 to the west hills) is characterized by such conditions.

    That and alot of smelly homeless types.

    Robin Hubert
     
  10. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Tue, 18 Feb 2003 16:35:51 -0800,
    >
    <[email protected]> , Michael

    > James Anderson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >So my wife and I just got back yesterday from a weekend
    in Portland,
    > >Oregon; now that is a bike riding town! I have read that
    they may
    > >actually be the best, well it has our vote.

    > >It poured down rain for the entire 3 days that we were
    there, and we saw
    > >more bike riders in those 3 days than 6 months of sunny
    days in Southern
    > >California. I don't know the statistics, but I would say
    that 20-30% of
    > >the people downtown ride to work; bravo Portland.

    > Best estimates show bicycling to make up about 3.3 percent
    of all trips
    > in the inner, urbanized parts of Portland. In the city as
    a whole,
    > bicycle use is estimated at two percent of trips.

    > There's higher mode split for bicycling (3.3 percent) in
    areas with:
    > good street continuity, sidewalks, easy street crossings,
    and gentle
    > topography. Much of inner Portland (i.e., west of I-205 to
    the west
    > hills) is characterized by such conditions.

    You're a Vancouverite, no? I'm curious about the bike stats in Vancouver, and Victoria too.
    Certainly more Vancouverites ride than in most American cities, though I'm sure it's still a really
    small percentage. There seems to be a higher percentage of cyclists in Victoria, but maybe a lot of
    them are just tourists. Where did you get those stats, anyway?

    A great thing about the PNW is that while the weather often sucks, it bothers people less. I think
    they're generally more outdoorsy up there than anywhere else in the US. Southern CA takes the prize
    for the best weather, *and* the biggest wussies.

    Matt O.
     
  11. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 18 Feb 2003 18:39:45 -0800 (PST), <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve McDonald) wrote:

    >
    > Portland is very pro-active in developing bikepaths and routes and the folks there do a lot of
    > riding. But Eugene, which has only 20% of Portland's population in its metropolitan area, has
    > more miles of off-road bikepaths and close to as many riders. With the recent completion of
    > two important stretches of path that linked other sections together, I'd match our bikepath
    > network against any in the world. Portland essentially got its impetus for bikepath building,
    > from the example Eugene set, beginning in 1972. Almost every progressive movement in Oregon
    > begins in Eugene, then Portland appropriates it and eventually manages to claim most of the
    > credit. But, they're welcome to it and show that they know where to look for guidance.
    >
    >Steve McDonald

    The master plan for the University of Oregon at Eugene is a model of revolutionary planning thought.
    Perhaps the City wisely appropriated its formula.
    --
    zk
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Steve
    McDonald) wrote:

    > Portland is very pro-active in developing bikepaths and routes and the folks there do a lot
    > of riding. But Eugene, which has only 20% of Portland's population in its metropolitan area,
    > has more miles of off-road bikepaths and close to as many riders. With the recent completion
    > of two important stretches of path that linked other sections together, I'd match our
    > bikepath network against any in the world. Portland essentially got its impetus for bikepath
    > building, from the example Eugene set, beginning in 1972. Almost every progressive movement
    > in Oregon begins in Eugene, then Portland appropriates it and eventually manages to claim
    > most of the credit. But, they're welcome to it and show that they know where to look for
    > guidance.
    >
    > Steve McDonald

    Isn't Eugene where the state university is? University towns tend to be a bit more cycle friendly.

    But really, you'd imagine southern CA would be pretty nice for bikes, with the great weather. But
    from what I hear, nice climate is not necessarily a guarantee of great riding.
     
  13. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Wed, 19 Feb 2003 02:59:58 GMT, <[email protected]>, "Matt O'Toole"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You're a Vancouverite, no? I'm curious about the bike stats in Vancouver, and Victoria too.
    >Certainly more Vancouverites ride than in most American cities, though I'm sure it's still a really
    >small percentage.

    There were surveys done and actual counts along bike routes. It's estimated that bicycle modal split
    has increased since adding bike routes. Still, on a good day it's only about 2.0% off traffic
    entering the downtown core and falling to 1.1% on cold, wet, windy days.
    http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/engsvcs/transport/cycling/pdf/12cReview.pdf

    I saw another survey that counted bicycles on bridges entering downtown and, IIRC, optimistically
    estimated 2.8% mode share. I think it was part of the Downtown Transportation Plan report.

    UBC, the other major cycle commuting destination, sees between seven and eight percent mode share.
    www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/ubccarpoolreport.pdf

    >There seems to be a higher percentage of cyclists in Victoria, but maybe a lot of them are just
    >tourists.

    5% of all trips to work in the Capital Region were made by bicycle in 1996, the highest of any
    Census Metropolitan Area in Canada; 10% to 20% of journey-to-work trips were by bicycle in most
    parts of Oak Bay and Victoria; and, 5% to 10% of journey-to work trips were by bicycle in several
    parts of Esquimalt, Sidney, and southern Saanich.
    http://www.crd.bc.ca/regplan/RTP/Reports/cycle98.htm

    >Where did you get those stats, anyway?
    >
    http://www.trans.ci.portland.or.us/Plans/BicycleMasterPlan/policies.htm

    >A great thing about the PNW is that while the weather often sucks, it bothers people less. I think
    >they're generally more outdoorsy up there than anywhere else in the US. Southern CA takes the prize
    >for the best weather, *and* the biggest wussies.
    >
    >Matt O.

    The point is that if you don't cycle in the wet, you don't cycle much at all. You figure out how to
    stay comfortable under the conditions so you're not deterred by a little liquid sunshine.
    --
    zk
     
  14. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Wed, 19 Feb 2003 05:01:40 GMT, <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Marlene
    Blanshay) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >(Steve McDonald) wrote:
    >
    >> Portland is very pro-active in developing bikepaths and routes and the folks there do a lot
    >> of riding. But Eugene, which has only 20% of Portland's population in its metropolitan area,
    >> has more miles of off-road bikepaths and close to as many riders. With the recent completion
    >> of two important stretches of path that linked other sections together, I'd match our
    >> bikepath network against any in the world. Portland essentially got its impetus for bikepath
    >> building, from the example Eugene set, beginning in 1972. Almost every progressive movement
    >> in Oregon begins in Eugene, then Portland appropriates it and eventually manages to claim
    >> most of the credit. But, they're welcome to it and show that they know where to look for
    >> guidance.
    >>
    >> Steve McDonald
    >
    >Isn't Eugene where the state university is? University towns tend to be a bit more cycle friendly.
    >
    Yep, the University's master plan is the subject of a book and an ongoing experiment in the use of
    pattern languages. http://www.google.com/search?q=Oregon+Experiment+Christopher+Alexander

    >But really, you'd imagine southern CA would be pretty nice for bikes, with the great weather. But
    >from what I hear, nice climate is not necessarily a guarantee of great riding.

    That's for sure. We can't do anything about it anyway so just dress right and ride.

    City – U.S. %Bicycle %Walk Atlanta .7% 2.4% Chicago
    1.% 9.0% Denver
    2.4% 5.6% Houston .4% 3.0% Los Angeles
    3.% 9.0% New York .6% 15.4% Phoenix
    4.1% 3.6% San Diego .6% 5.2% San Francisco
    5.% 10.6% Washington, D.C. .6% 8.8%

    City - Canada %Bicycle %Walk Montreal
    6.1% 11.8% Ottawa
    7.3% 12.1% Toronto
    8.% 6.1% Vancouver
    9.3% 14.3%

    City - World London
    10.4% 34.2% Copenhagen
    11.5% 12.5% Shanghai
    12.9% 32.9%

    http://www.sactaqc.org/Resources/literature/transportation/mode_split.htm
    --
    zk
     
  15. On Tue, 18 Feb 2003 18:39:45 -0800 (PST) in rec.bicycles.misc, [email protected] (Steve
    McDonald) wrote:

    > With the recent completion of two important stretches of path that linked other sections together,
    > I'd match our bikepath network against any in the world.

    i'll take streets designed with proper calming measures to keep drivers at reasonable speeds over
    bike paths that make cyclists second class citizens any day. paths are not bike paths, they're
    multi-use paths, and if they are at all attractive to runners, roller bladers, wheelchairs, and
    peds, are useless for anyone wanting to use bikes for serious transportation.
     
  16. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Dennis P. Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 18 Feb 2003 18:39:45 -0800 (PST) in
    rec.bicycles.misc,
    > [email protected] (Steve McDonald) wrote:
    >
    > > With the recent completion of two important stretches of path that
    linked other sections
    > > together, I'd match our bikepath network against any in
    the world.
    >
    > i'll take streets designed with proper calming measures to
    keep
    > drivers at reasonable speeds over bike paths that make
    cyclists
    > second class citizens any day. paths are not bike paths,
    they're
    > multi-use paths, and if they are at all attractive to
    runners,
    > roller bladers, wheelchairs, and peds, are useless for
    anyone
    > wanting to use bikes for serious transportation.

    I disagree. First, those other users' needs must be served too. Second, even if they don't allow you
    to hammer along at 20 mph, these paths can still provide valuable shortcuts where roads don't go,
    shaving miles and minutes off a commute. There are a couple of paths like this here in Blacksburg,
    VA. Irvine, CA is full of them -- following culverts, powerline cuts, etc., bypassing major
    intersections where one might have to wait at lights, etc. They're certainly not a singular
    solution, but can still be valuable as part of the overall plan.

    Matt O.
     
  17. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 18 Feb 2003 22:54:42 -0800 (PST), <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve McDonald) wrote:

    > Regarding Z.K.'s blurb about the U. of Oregon being a masterpiece of revolutionary planning, I'm
    > amazed to hear this. I've been a part of this university community all my life and to my thinking,
    > it's a mess of sprawl and disorganization. Is Z.K. the Dean of the Dept. or Urban Planning there?

    It looks good in theory.

    The Oregon Experiment approach was based on the University's desire to develop a planning method
    that met three goals as it guided growth and change: 1. that the solution be a process and not just
    a map; 2. that the process honor and strengthen the University's tradition of meaningful
    consultation with students, faculty, and staff; and 3. that the plan provide for continuous
    adjustment of campus facilities in response to changing educational policies and programs.

    http://www.uoregon.edu/~uplan/planexp.html
    --
    zk
     
  18. Barry Gaudet

    Barry Gaudet Guest

    Steve McDonald <[email protected]> wrote:
    : D. Harris sez:
    [...]
    :> second-class citizens, any day. Paths are not bikepaths, they're multi-use paths, and if they are
    :> at all attractive to runners, roller-bladers, wheelchairs, and peds, are useless for anyone
    :> wanting to
    :. use bikes for serious transportation.

    : I say nutz to this view of off-street bikepaths. I hear this idea expressed occasionally, but
    : can't understand its basis. I rip around on our separate bikepaths every day and only rarely
    : am I impeded in having a hard and unbroken workout by other types of users.
    [...]
    : A mile on an on-street lane, seems as long and hard to me, as five miles on one of our
    : beautiful, separate and quiet bikepaths, through the woods and along the river. Wildlife
    : abounds and you become one with Nature.

    Pravda.

    I can't use them now as they are not winter maintained but the river trails in Guelph provide a
    nice cross-city route - early morning, mist rising off the river, ducks and geese paddling along,
    turtles trekking down to the shore, groundhogs, early rising squirrels chittering about rabbits
    getting in a last nibble of grass before calling it a night....

    That's what helps make cycling an enjoyable activity.

    --
    'People think I'm insane because I am frowning all the time All day long I think of things
    but nothing seems to satisfy' 'Make a joke and I will sigh And you will laugh and I will
    cry' -Black Sabbath
     
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