FYI chain question results

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by dreaded, Sep 13, 2004.

  1. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    yesterday i posted a query about my chain and it's slipping off when under a
    lot of torque. several suggested replacing the chain. i stopped by the bike
    shop today and got a new chain. the bike dealer/repair person was very
    helpful and said i could try the new chain without a new ring but it
    wouldn't help. we both noticed that the middle ring had very pointy
    teeth=exessive wear. i thought just replacing the chain would help so i did
    that in front of the shop but when i tried to ride the bike it was much
    worse, slipping off the middle ring under even light load (although not at
    all on the large ring or small suggesting to me that the rear cassette was
    fine). i rode back to the shop and asked the repair person why a new chain
    would slip off even more than the old one. she told me that since the old
    gears were so worn they were used to the old chain and that i need a new
    cassette and front middle ring. i looked closely at the old cassette and it
    was obvious which were my favorite gears but it didnt look too worn to me. a
    new front ring (shimano 105) was $20 the rear cassette was $50. i just had
    enough for the front one. i put it on and no probs all the way to work!
    after posting that question yesterday i felt foolish because i've only had a
    new road bike for 3000+ miles. i used to have an old benotto w/campy stuff
    and nothing ever wore out on that bike so i see im naive about the new
    stuff. it seems the new 9-speed gears are so thin that a new chain every
    1000mi is recommended. that old 7-sp benotto mustve had 10K miles on it's
    gears and chain!
    -alan
     
    Tags:


  2. On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 17:46:21 -0700, dreaded wrote:

    > very helpful and said i could try the new chain without a new ring but it
    > wouldn't help.


    Certainly worth a try.

    > why a new chain would slip off even more than the old one.


    Clearly the single symptom of a worn-out ring.

    she told me
    > that since the old gears were so worn they were used to the old chain and
    > that i need a new cassette and front middle ring. i looked closely at the
    > old cassette and it was obvious which were my favorite gears but it didnt
    > look too worn to me.


    It might be OK if it wasn't used too much with the old chain.

    > have an old benotto w/campy stuff and nothing ever wore out on that bike
    > so i see im naive about the new stuff. it seems the new 9-speed gears are
    > so thin that a new chain every 1000mi is recommended. that old 7-sp
    > benotto mustve had 10K miles on it's gears and chain!


    Campy equipment is not magical. What happened with that old bike was that
    all the parts, chain, cassette (or freewheel) and chainrings were worn.
    Replacing the chain would have put you exactly where you are now.

    I don't think a mileage number is the right way to gauge chain
    replacement. Better to measure chain wear. Look across the top run of
    chain, and count 12 full links. Get a ruler, and measure from say the end
    of one pin to the one 12 links away. It should be exactly 12 inches on a
    new chain. At 12 1/16" I replace my chain. Usually that is 2000-3000
    miles, depending. If you wait until the distance is 12 1/8", you should
    replace the cassette too, and hope you don't have to replace the
    chainrings. Usually, they are more than the cassette.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Accept risk. Accept responsibility. Put a lawyer out of
    _`\(,_ | business.
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  3. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    SNIP > I don't think a mileage number is the right way to gauge chain
    > replacement. Better to measure chain wear. Look across the top run of
    > chain, and count 12 full links. Get a ruler, and measure from say the end
    > of one pin to the one 12 links away. It should be exactly 12 inches on a
    > new chain. At 12 1/16" I replace my chain. Usually that is 2000-3000
    > miles, depending. If you wait until the distance is 12 1/8", you should
    > replace the cassette too, and hope you don't have to replace the
    > chainrings. Usually, they are more than the cassette.
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | Accept risk. Accept responsibility. Put a lawyer out of
    > _`\(,_ | business.
    > (_)/ (_) |
    >
    >


    thanks...actually while at the shop we measured with their ruler and the
    chain was at the "replace" mark which looked like about 1/8 away. looking at
    the cassette it doesnt look too bad, the front middle ring was much
    worse-which makes sense since im always on that ring when going uphill and i
    use the rear cassette gears more evenly. the bike rides fine now with a new
    middle front and new chain.
    -alan
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >thanks...actually while at the shop we measured with their ruler and the
    >chain was at the "replace" mark which looked like about 1/8 away.


    1/16 is the replace mark. 1/8 is the already done damage mark.

    >looking at the cassette it doesnt look too bad,


    On HG cogs, that are shaped to easy shifts, it is difficult to eye ball
    wear.

    >the front middle ring was much worse-which makes sense since im always on that
    >ring when going uphill and i use the rear cassette gears more evenly. the bike
    >rides fine now with a new middle front and new chain.


    Just remember than changing a $20 chain will save you money in the long
    run.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  5. salmoneous

    salmoneous Guest

    > we both noticed that the middle ring had very pointy
    > teeth


    Which ring - the one behind the rabbit?
     
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