Gallbladder Flush Worked For Me



B

Bew

Guest
Are you thinking of trying a gallbladder flush . There are many out there , the one that worked for
me and others I know was the olive oil and grapefruit juice . I had great success with it and got
rid of hundreds of stones as did others I know . I do the flush at least twice a year . I have gone
from pain , sickness and feeling constantly bloated to feeling great , my gallbladder attacks
disappeared after the first flush I did three years ago and have never returned . It certainly gave
me a new lease on life , check it if you are wondering and make up your own mind about it .

Cheers

---

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.592 / Virus Database: 375 -
Release Date: 18/02/2004
 
M

Mark Probert-Fe

Guest
"Bew" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Are you thinking of trying a gallbladder flush . There are many out there
,
> the one that worked for me and others I know was the olive oil and grapefruit juice . I had great
> success with it and got rid of hundreds of stones as did others I know . I do the flush at least
> twice a year . I
have
> gone from pain , sickness and feeling constantly bloated to feeling great
,
> my gallbladder attacks disappeared after the first flush I did three years ago and have never
> returned . It certainly gave me a new lease on life , check it if you are wondering and make up
> your own mind about it .

That may be your problem, you are merely leasing your life. I own mine.
 
D

David Wright

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Bew <[email protected]> wrote:
>Are you thinking of trying a gallbladder flush . There are many out there , the one that worked for
>me and others I know was the olive oil and grapefruit juice . I had great success with it and got
>rid of hundreds of stones

No, you got rid of hundreds of little blobs made up of the junk you took to get rid of the
gallstones. Gallstones are tiny little things that look like bits of gravel. They aren't big
fatty blobs.

-- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net These are my opinions only, but they're almost always
correct. "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants were standing on my
shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
 
A

Anth

Guest
(You should speak to someone in here who did a flush and found out later that his bladder was still
full of stones) He reported pain relief though. Anth

"Bew" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Are you thinking of trying a gallbladder flush . There are many out there
,
> the one that worked for me and others I know was the olive oil and grapefruit juice . I had great
> success with it and got rid of hundreds of stones as did others I know . I do the flush at least
> twice a year . I
have
> gone from pain , sickness and feeling constantly bloated to feeling great
,
> my gallbladder attacks disappeared after the first flush I did three years ago and have never
> returned . It certainly gave me a new lease on life , check it if you are wondering and make up
> your own mind about it .
>
> Cheers
>
>
> ---
>
> Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.592 / Virus Database: 375
> - Release Date: 18/02/2004
 
A

Anth

Guest
(Best thing would be some kind of scan before and after) I'd like to see someone actually take these
stones and mail them off to a lab to see what indeed they are. Anth

"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> (You should speak to someone in here who did a flush and found out later that his bladder was
> still full of stones) He reported pain relief though. Anth
>
> "Bew" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > Are you thinking of trying a gallbladder flush . There are many out
there
> ,
> > the one that worked for me and others I know was the olive oil and grapefruit juice . I had
> > great success with it and got rid of hundreds
of
> > stones as did others I know . I do the flush at least twice a year . I
> have
> > gone from pain , sickness and feeling constantly bloated to feeling
great
> ,
> > my gallbladder attacks disappeared after the first flush I did three
years
> > ago and have never returned . It certainly gave me a new lease on life , check it if you are
> > wondering and make up your own mind about it .
> >
> > Cheers
> >
> >
> > ---
> >
> > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.592 / Virus Database:
> > 375 - Release Date: 18/02/2004
> >
>
 
W

Wb

Guest
On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 06:04:21 -0000, "Anth" <[email protected]> wrote:

>(Best thing would be some kind of scan before and after) I'd like to see someone actually take
>these stones and mail them off to a lab to see what indeed they are. Anth

Exactamundo ! Scanning before and after !

You are on the right track about the "stone" testing.

--

Take out the G'RBAGE to reply
[email protected]
 
O

Orac

Guest
In article <0pV%[email protected]>,
[email protected] (David Wright) wrote:

> In article <[email protected]>, Bew <[email protected]> wrote:
> >Are you thinking of trying a gallbladder flush . There are many out there , the one that worked
> >for me and others I know was the olive oil and grapefruit juice . I had great success with it and
> >got rid of hundreds of stones
>
> No, you got rid of hundreds of little blobs made up of the junk you took to get rid of the
> gallstones. Gallstones are tiny little things that look like bits of gravel. They aren't big
> fatty blobs.

Cholesterol gallstones can be a bit crumbly and deformable, but most gallstones are not.

--
Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
|
|"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"
 
O

Orac

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote:

> (Best thing would be some kind of scan before and after) I'd like to see someone actually take
> these stones and mail them off to a lab to see what indeed they are.

You mean alties haven't already done this? It would seem to be a VERY obvious thing to do to see if
these flushes are working, as would a before-and-after set of ultrasounds or CT scans. Why haven't
such things been done? A positive result for such things would at least be preliminary evidence that
these flushes *might* work, but I've yet to see an altie show even evidence that rudimentary.

--
Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
|
|"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"
 
O

Orac

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
WB <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 06:04:21 -0000, "Anth" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >(Best thing would be some kind of scan before and after) I'd like to see someone actually take
> >these stones and mail them off to a lab to see what indeed they are. Anth
>
>
> Exactamundo ! Scanning before and after !
>
> You are on the right track about the "stone" testing.

The next step for him is to start wondering WHY such blindingly obvious studies either have not been
done or are never mentioned by proponents of gallbladder flushes. If he reaches that point, there
may be hope for him yet.

--
Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
|
|"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"
 
O

Orac

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Gymmy Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Would require controlled testing and double blind studies.

Eventually, but not necessarily right off the bat.

>This may cost up to one million dollars to perform.

Preliminary studies wouldn't. (See below.)

>The medical control people have made sure that "no money" medical procedures are never tested so
>they can keep putting them down and disputing them successfully to the ignorant people.

What alties seem to forget is that controlled studies are the last step in developing evidence for a
treatment. Before that, you have to do preliminary studies to determine if the controlled studies
are even worth pursuing. If the preliminary studies are promising, THEN the randomized studies
become worthwhile. Often, these preliminary studies are not all that expensive. Certainly, in the
case of gallbladder flushes, it would be relatively inexpensive.

One preliminary study would actually be fairly easy and straightforward. It wouldn't even be that
expensive and could probably be done for maybe $10,000 or $20,000, depending on the number of
patients used. You would need a group of patients with symptomatic gallstones documented by
ultrasound and whatever other medical tests were appropriate. You could choose a group that was
going to undergo surgery anyway, but have them delay their surgery a few weeks to undergo the full
course of gallbladder flushes. You could then do ultrasound studies of them before the flushes, in
the middle of the flushes, and after the flushes are complete. Anything they pass in their stool
that looks like it might be a stone, you would count and send to the lab to determine if it really
is a stone. At the end, you would look at the pathology results of the gallbladders removed and
carefully look at the remaining stones to see if there were any signs that they had shrunk. (The
cost of surgery would not be in the study budget because surgery is the standard of care for
symptomatic gallbladder disease and would therefore be paid for by insurance or other means.) Any
objective evidence that the number of gallstones decreased in the group of people treated with
flushes would be considered a promising result. Any evidence that people undergoing gallbladder
flushes were passing lots of gallstones in their stool would be considered a promising result.

Randomized double-blind studies may be the gold standard as far as evidence goes, but less
complicated and less expensive studies are the preliminary work necessary to justify them.

--
Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
|
|"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"
 
M

Mark Probert-Fe

Guest
"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> (Best thing would be some kind of scan before and after)

That is what I asked Bew for and Bew took a hike on a direct response.

That is exactly the problem with Alties such as Bew, when asked a direct question that can lead to
proof of their claims, they do not provide a direct answer.

> I'd like to see someone actually take these stones and mail them off to a lab to see what indeed
> they are. Anth
>
> "Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > (You should speak to someone in here who did a flush and found out later that his bladder was
> > still full of stones) He reported pain relief though. Anth
> >
> > "Bew" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > > Are you thinking of trying a gallbladder flush . There are many out
> there
> > ,
> > > the one that worked for me and others I know was the olive oil and grapefruit juice . I had
> > > great success with it and got rid of hundreds
> of
> > > stones as did others I know . I do the flush at least twice a year . I
> > have
> > > gone from pain , sickness and feeling constantly bloated to feeling
> great
> > ,
> > > my gallbladder attacks disappeared after the first flush I did three
> years
> > > ago and have never returned . It certainly gave me a new lease on life
,
> > > check it if you are wondering and make up your own mind about it .
> > >
> > > Cheers
> > >
> > >
> > > ---
> > >
> > > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.592 / Virus Database:
> > > 375 - Release Date: 18/02/2004
> > >
> > >
> >
>
 
M

Mark Probert-Fe

Guest
"Gymmy Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]...
> Would require controlled testing and double blind studies.

Nope. It would require a sonogram for definitive diagnosis, which is the first step. It would
then require a flush, which is cheapo, and then a follow-up sonogram to see if the stones are
still there.

Simple. So simple that one wonders why the proponents of these flushes do not apply to NCCAM for a
couple of bucks to provide the studies.

The only reason I can think of is that they are afraid the results wil show that the flushes
do not work.

This may cost up
> to one million dollars to perform. The medical control people have made
sure
> that "no money" medical procedures are never tested so they can keep
putting
> them down and disputing them successfully to the ignorant people.
>
> <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > Curious...has nobody out there done any definitive serious testing in this area to determine
> > whether there is any value in "stone flushing" or whether its devotees are several salami slices
> > short of a sandwich? What about all that Government CAM money research? Doesn't seem like this
> > would be rocket science...or would it? Or maybe the product sellers//practioners would rather
> > this info not be known?
> >
> > .
>
 
O

Orac

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Mark Probert-February 28, 2004" <Mark
[email protected]> wrote:

> "Gymmy Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:p[email protected]...
> > Would require controlled testing and double blind studies.
>
> Nope. It would require a sonogram for definitive diagnosis, which is the first step. It would
> then require a flush, which is cheapo, and then a follow-up sonogram to see if the stones are
> still there.
>
> Simple. So simple that one wonders why the proponents of these flushes do not apply to NCCAM for a
> couple of bucks to provide the studies.
>
> The only reason I can think of is that they are afraid the results wil show that the flushes do
> not work.

Yeah, it's amusing how alties always use that the old red herring of needing to do a huge study to
prove their results. Sometimes it's true, but most times it's not. Depending upon the specfic case,
you don't always need to do such large studies to develop preliminary evidence supporting your
claim. In the case of gallbladder flushes, I have posted repeatedly an example of a trial that could
be done for maybe $20,000 that would demonstrate whether or not the claim that flushes can get rid
of gallstones has enough merit to go on to a bigger study for confirmation. Basically, all that
would have to be done is to find some patients with ultrasound-confirmed symptomatic gallstone
disease scheduled to undergo surgery and then, before surgery, do ultrasounds before, during, and
after a course of gallbladder flushes to see if the number of gallstones decreased. Very simple. Not
very expensive as far as medical studies go. In addition, patients can look at their stools and
retrieve anything that looks like gallstones so that they can be analyzed to determine if they are,
in fact, gallstones or not.

Very simple. Not very expensive. Yet I have not seen a single altie describe or quote such a study?
Why has such a blindingly obvious and simple study not been done? It's so freaking simple as far as
medical studies go, yet it appears that alties haven't done it.

--
Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
|
|"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"
 
A

Anth

Guest
Sometimes your poo is larger than your anus. Anth

"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, <[email protected]> wrote:
> >Curious...has nobody out there done any definitive serious testing in this area to determine
> >whether there is any value in "stone flushing" or whether its devotees are several salami slices
> >short of a sandwich? What about all that Government CAM money research? Doesn't seem like this
> >would be rocket science...or would it? Or maybe the product sellers//practioners would rather
> >this info not be known?
>
> In many cases, there's no real point. It's obvious on the face of it, for example, that these
> "gall bladder flushes" can't possibly work, because the supposed "gallstones" they produce are far
> too large to fit through the bile duct. My favorite analogy is that it'd be like trying to push a
> beach ball through a garden hose.
>
> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net These are my opinions only, but they're almost
> always correct. "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants were standing on my
> shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
>
>
 
A

Anth

Guest
I'll tell you what how's about this I will do the flush and if you can get someone to analyse them
(respecting my privacy) you can get them analysed? Anth

"Orac" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]
ge1.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> In article <[email protected]>, "Anth"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > (Best thing would be some kind of scan before and after) I'd like to see someone actually take
> > these stones and mail them off to
a
> > lab to see what indeed they are.
>
> You mean alties haven't already done this? It would seem to be a VERY obvious thing to do to see
> if these flushes are working, as would a before-and-after set of ultrasounds or CT scans. Why
> haven't such things been done? A positive result for such things would at least be preliminary
> evidence that these flushes *might* work, but I've yet to see an altie show even evidence that
> rudimentary.
>
> --
> Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
> |
> |"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"
 
A

Anth

Guest
You don't even need people with stones, scan yourself, take the flush, if you have no stones and
zillioins come out then you know there's a rabbit up. Take the stones to your chem lab, get them
analysed and show what they are. I think the fact that someone on here was flushing and later
(when they needed surgery) were found to be 'very stoned' is a decent enough argument against the
flush. Anth

"Orac" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]
ge1.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> In article <[email protected]>, "Mark Probert-February 28, 2004" <Mark
> Very simple. Not very expensive. Yet I have not seen a single altie describe or quote such a
> study? Why has such a blindingly obvious and simple study not been done? It's so freaking simple
> as far as medical studies go, yet it appears that alties haven't done it.
> --
> Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
> |
> |"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"
 
T

Tsu Dho Nimh

Guest
"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Sometimes your poo is larger than your anus.

Yes, but the anal sphincter muscle can stretch way more than the one on the common bile duct.

>
>"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]prodigy.com...
>> In article <[email protected]>, <[email protected]> wrote:
>> >Curious...has nobody out there done any definitive serious testing in this area to determine
>> >whether there is any value in "stone flushing" or whether its devotees are several salami slices
>> >short of a sandwich? What about all that Government CAM money research? Doesn't seem like this
>> >would be rocket science...or would it? Or maybe the product sellers//practioners would rather
>> >this info not be known?
>>
>> In many cases, there's no real point. It's obvious on the face of it, for example, that these
>> "gall bladder flushes" can't possibly work, because the supposed "gallstones" they produce are
>> far too large to fit through the bile duct. My favorite analogy is that it'd be like trying to
>> push a beach ball through a garden hose.
>>
>> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net These are my opinions only, but they're almost
>> always correct. "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants were standing on my
>> shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

Tsu Dho Nimh

--
When businesses invoke the "protection of consumers," it's a lot like politicians invoking morality
and children - grab your wallet and/or your kid and run for your life.
 
O

Orac

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Sometimes your poo is larger than your anus.

Your anus is far more expandable than your common bile duct. Also, if you were to stretch your
common bile duct that much it would cause excruciating biliary pain.

--
Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
|
|"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"
 
D

David Wright

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
>Sometimes your poo is larger than your anus.

Your anus is designed to stretch briefly to accomodate this situation. Your common bile duct is not.
It will stretch a tiny bit, but I gather the pain is excruciating. A marble- sized object is *not*
going to go through, period.

-- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net These are my opinions only, but they're almost always
correct. "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants were standing on my
shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)

>"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]...
>> In article <[email protected]>, <[email protected]> wrote:
>> >Curious...has nobody out there done any definitive serious testing in this area to determine
>> >whether there is any value in "stone flushing" or whether its devotees are several salami slices
>> >short of a sandwich? What about all that Government CAM money research? Doesn't seem like this
>> >would be rocket science...or would it? Or maybe the product sellers//practioners would rather
>> >this info not be known?
>>
>> In many cases, there's no real point. It's obvious on the face of it, for example, that these
>> "gall bladder flushes" can't possibly work, because the supposed "gallstones" they produce are
>> far too large to fit through the bile duct. My favorite analogy is that it'd be like trying to
>> push a beach ball through a garden hose.
 
O

Orac

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (David Wright) wrote:

> In article <[email protected]>, Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
> >Sometimes your poo is larger than your anus.
>
> Your anus is designed to stretch briefly to accomodate this situation. Your common bile duct is
> not. It will stretch a tiny bit, but I gather the pain is excruciating. A marble- sized object is
> *not* going to go through, period.

The normal diameter of the common bile duct (CBD) is less than 10 mm. In cases of chronic common
bile duct obstruction, it can gradually stretch without much pain to around 20-25 mm, but this
nearly always accompanied by jaundice and is nearly always caused by malignancy. Acute CBD
obstruction, as caused by gallstones, is nearly always accompanied by severe right upper quadrant or
epigastric pain.

Also, even if a small gallstone of, say 10 mm in diameter, did manage to find its way into the CBD,
in most cases, it would very likely lodge at and obstruct the Sphincter of Oddi (a sphicter found
where the CBD enters the duodenum). Indeed, endoscopists often cut this sphincter during endoscopic
retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) to allow gallstones in the biliary tree to pass or to be
extracted with various endoscopic instruments. If lots of gallstones find their way into the CBD,
complications can include jaundice, ascending cholangitis (a life-threatening infection of the
biliary tree), or gallstone pancreatitis (another potentially life-threatening condition).

--
Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
|
|"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?"