Ganglian Cyst: A Result of Cycling?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gary Jacobson, May 28, 2004.

  1. I wonder if this is amore common problem among cyclists than in the general
    population?

    Ganglion cysts, it is thought, can arise from tendonitis and arthritis. I
    think that the soft tissue in my hands has been stressed from a relatively
    large volume of riding this spring. For many years I've had pain in the area
    that the cyst has sprouted, and I have always attributed the pain to riding.

    This year I moved away from anatomical bars for aesthetic reasons. Maybe a
    dumb move.

    No real treatment for it and unfortunately the cyst interferes with the
    motion of my thumb and impinges on nerves, and so I think riding will just
    makes it worse.

    Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by hitting
    them with a bible.
    Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)

    Gary Jacobson
    Rosendale, NY
     
    Tags:


  2. frank121

    frank121 Guest

    GJ,

    I believe the latest scientific consensus is that a ganglion cyst is a mark
    of the Devil...


    "Gary Jacobson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I wonder if this is amore common problem among cyclists than in the

    general
    > population?
    >
    > Ganglion cysts, it is thought, can arise from tendonitis and arthritis. I
    > think that the soft tissue in my hands has been stressed from a relatively
    > large volume of riding this spring. For many years I've had pain in the

    area
    > that the cyst has sprouted, and I have always attributed the pain to

    riding.
    >
    > This year I moved away from anatomical bars for aesthetic reasons. Maybe a
    > dumb move.
    >
    > No real treatment for it and unfortunately the cyst interferes with the
    > motion of my thumb and impinges on nerves, and so I think riding will just
    > makes it worse.
    >
    > Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    > habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by

    hitting
    > them with a bible.
    > Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)
    >
    > Gary Jacobson
    > Rosendale, NY
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Gary Jacobson wrote:
    > I wonder if this is amore common problem among cyclists than in the
    > general population?
    >
    > Ganglion cysts, it is thought, can arise from tendonitis and
    > arthritis. I think that the soft tissue in my hands has been stressed
    > from a relatively large volume of riding this spring. For many years
    > I've had pain in the area that the cyst has sprouted, and I have
    > always attributed the pain to riding.
    >
    > This year I moved away from anatomical bars for aesthetic reasons.
    > Maybe a dumb move.
    >
    > No real treatment for it and unfortunately the cyst interferes with
    > the motion of my thumb and impinges on nerves, and so I think riding
    > will just makes it worse.
    >
    > Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    > habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by
    > hitting them with a bible.
    > Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)


    Bang it with a copy of Zinn? :)

    (Actually, I think that /really is/ an accepted treatment for ganglion
    cysts -- pound 'em into submission?)

    Bill "suggest consulting your doc" S.
     
  4. carlfogel

    carlfogel Guest

    Gary Jacobson wrote:
    > I wonder if this is amore common problem among cyclists than in the
    > general population?
    > Ganglion cysts, it is thought, can arise from tendonitis and arthritis.
    > I think that the soft tissue in my hands has been stressed from a
    > relatively large volume of riding this spring. For many years I've had
    > pain in the area that the cyst has sprouted, and I have always
    > attributed the pain to riding.
    > This year I moved away from anatomical bars for aesthetic reasons. Maybe
    > a dumb move.
    > No real treatment for it and unfortunately the cyst interferes with the
    > motion of my thumb and impinges on nerves, and so I think riding will
    > just makes it worse.
    > Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    > habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by
    > hitting them with a bible. Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)
    > Gary Jacobson Rosendale, NY




    Dear Gary,

    Here's what a doctor pointed out last October when the subject
    last came up:

    <http://groups.google.com/[email protected]
    sting.google.com&output=gplain>

    Note the comment about cancer.

    He was too tactful to add that misguided patients occasionally break
    their own wrists in their enthusiasm.

    Carl Fogel



    --
     
  5. On Sat, 29 May 2004 03:45:06 GMT, carlfogel
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Gary Jacobson wrote:
    > > I wonder if this is amore common problem among cyclists than in the
    > > general population?
    > > Ganglion cysts, it is thought, can arise from tendonitis and arthritis.
    > > I think that the soft tissue in my hands has been stressed from a
    > > relatively large volume of riding this spring. For many years I've had
    > > pain in the area that the cyst has sprouted, and I have always
    > > attributed the pain to riding.
    > > This year I moved away from anatomical bars for aesthetic reasons. Maybe
    > > a dumb move.
    > > No real treatment for it and unfortunately the cyst interferes with the
    > > motion of my thumb and impinges on nerves, and so I think riding will
    > > just makes it worse.
    > > Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    > > habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by
    > > hitting them with a bible. Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)
    > > Gary Jacobson Rosendale, NY

    >
    >
    >
    >Dear Gary,
    >
    >Here's what a doctor pointed out last October when the subject
    >last came up:
    >
    ><http://groups.google.com/[email protected]
    >sting.google.com&output=gplain>
    >
    >Note the comment about cancer.
    >
    >He was too tactful to add that misguided patients occasionally break
    >their own wrists in their enthusiasm.
    >
    >Carl Fogel


    Dear Richard,

    So much for the vaunted angled brackets! I was grossly
    deceived about their power to contain even the longest url.
    (Or the editor that I used added a hyphen and broke the
    line.)

    Thanks for smacking the swollen address flat with tinyurl.

    Carl Fogel
     
  6. [email protected] wrote:
    > Dear Richard,
    >
    > So much for the vaunted angled brackets! I was grossly
    > deceived about their power to contain even the longest url.
    > (Or the editor that I used added a hyphen and broke the
    > line.)
    >
    > Thanks for smacking the swollen address flat with tinyurl.


    Dear Carl,

    I had never heard of angled brackets serving that function. I must
    admit that I was stumped by the hyphen for a moment.

    By the way, you have me thinking about getting my own Fury roadmaster
    to play on - do they come big enough for someone 6'4"?

    --
    R.

    <> Richard Brockie "Categorical statements
    <> The tall blond one. always cause trouble."
    <> [email protected]
     
  7. On Fri, 28 May 2004 23:39:39 -0700, Richard Brockie
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> Dear Richard,
    >>
    >> So much for the vaunted angled brackets! I was grossly
    >> deceived about their power to contain even the longest url.
    >> (Or the editor that I used added a hyphen and broke the
    >> line.)
    >>
    >> Thanks for smacking the swollen address flat with tinyurl.

    >
    >Dear Carl,
    >
    >I had never heard of angled brackets serving that function. I must
    >admit that I was stumped by the hyphen for a moment.
    >
    >By the way, you have me thinking about getting my own Fury roadmaster
    >to play on - do they come big enough for someone 6'4"?


    Dear Richard,

    Arrgh! Replied to the wrong post, but you still found me.
    Bad day.

    I hadn't heard of the angled bracket trick, either, but
    here's where I saw it:

    <http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=egotc.2931%24Ic3.583%40fe13.usenetserver.com&output=gplain>

    or

    http://tinyurl.com/yrarz


    A different editor may let this long address survive.
    Probably I just goofed something up, since Dave Ornee is
    usually reliable.

    As for the Fury RoadMaster, I suspect that it's only
    available from WalMart and therefore beyond your grasp in
    the UK. Here's the ad:

    <http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?cat=61903&dept=4171&product_id=2073252&path=0%3A4171%3A61903%3A61904%3A4180%3A4183%3A5304#long_descr>

    or

    http://tinyurl.com/2zy5p

    I'm just a touch over six feet and around 195 pounds, but
    luckily had a long seatpost of the right size lying around
    from God knows what. Riders your height probably need custom
    bikes anyway.

    The Fury RoadMaster, as you can see in the specifications,
    is intended for riders aged 10 to 17 (or 14 to adult,
    depending on where you read) and the price has now risen
    from $53.71 to $58.88, presumably due to demand for reliable
    transportation caused by the rising gasoline prices being
    discussed hopefully in other threads.

    The forty-pound shipping weight (mostly cardboard, or so my
    Fury assures me) would make export expensive.

    Possibly there's a similar bike in a similar UK store?

    Carl Fogel
     
  8. [email protected] wrote:
    > As for the Fury RoadMaster, I suspect that it's only
    > available from WalMart and therefore beyond your grasp in
    > the UK. Here's the ad:


    Dear Carl,

    Thanks for the links (which worked this time with the angled
    brackets). Do not be mislead as to my location by the email address -
    that is a vanity domain which advertises my origin. I am currently
    located a little down the road from Mike Jacoubowsky's shop where I
    worked shortly after moving to the US.

    > I'm just a touch over six feet and around 195 pounds, but
    > luckily had a long seatpost of the right size lying around
    > from God knows what. Riders your height probably need custom
    > bikes anyway.


    I am on the borderline for custom - the old Klein 63cm size of frames
    works very nicely for me. What diameter is the seat post in the Fury?

    > The Fury RoadMaster, as you can see in the specifications,
    > is intended for riders aged 10 to 17 (or 14 to adult,
    > depending on where you read) and the price has now risen
    > from $53.71 to $58.88, presumably due to demand for reliable
    > transportation caused by the rising gasoline prices being
    > discussed hopefully in other threads.
    >
    > The forty-pound shipping weight (mostly cardboard, or so my
    > Fury assures me) would make export expensive.
    >
    > Possibly there's a similar bike in a similar UK store?


    Almost certainly, as Walmart (by another name), exists in the UK.

    --
    R.

    <> Richard Brockie "Categorical statements
    <> The tall blond one. always cause trouble."
    <> [email protected]
     
  9. Peder

    Peder Guest

    "Gary Jacobson" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    > habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by
    > hitting them with a bible.
    > Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)
    >
    > Gary Jacobson
    > Rosendale, NY
    >
    >
    >
    >


    If the book trick doesn't work, you can have it drained.

    --
    Peder (Please reply to group only, email invalid)
     
  10. Gary Jacobson wrote:

    > Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    > habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by hitting
    > them with a bible.
    > Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)


    My non-cycling wife had one two years ago, I whacked it with a heavy
    book (I think it was "Organic Chemistry"!) and it never came back (the
    ganglion that is, not the wife).
     
  11. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 28 May 2004 23:39:39 -0700, Richard Brockie
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >By the way, you have me thinking about getting my own Fury roadmaster
    >to play on - do they come big enough for someone 6'4"?


    Yes, but only if you buy the bike stretcher (sold separately). My
    bike stretcher is made by GMC and is powered by an 8 cylinder
    internal combustion engine...just tie the head tube to the bike
    stretcher, tie the rear triangle to a tree, and stretch!
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  12. In <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] opined:

    > So much for the vaunted angled brackets! I was grossly
    > deceived about their power to contain even the longest url.


    Standard practice uses more than just angle brackets. It also includes
    "url:" prefixed to the actual URI, and harks back to a time when there
    may have actually been a need to explain that something like
    http://www.yahoo.com was a URL and not, well, something else. So:

    <url:http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=20c7afc9.0310070217.14e5a004%40posting.google.com&output=gplain>

    may be what you meant to do.

    My medical advice regarding my own ganglion cysts was simply to leave
    them alone unless they were in a particularly bothersome location, in
    which case they could easily be corrected through a surgical office
    procedure. I had the one at my right distal thumb joint treated because
    it made writing difficult, and I'm about to have the one on my forearm
    treated for the 21st century version of the same reason, but the one
    near my elbow and the one in my lower back just aren't much of a problem
    and will remain as they are.


    --
    Dave Salovesh
    [email protected]
    (REPLACE example WITH mindspring TO EMAIL ME)
     
  13. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    "Gary Jacobson" <[email protected]> writes:

    > This year I moved away from anatomical bars for aesthetic
    > reasons. Maybe a dumb move.


    IME "anatomical" bars were far less anatomically appropriate for me,
    and were uncomfortable and fugly to boot.

    > Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of
    > *cycling habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be
    > cured by hitting them with a bible. Maybe I need to consult a nun
    > who rides.)


    Any large book will do, it just ruptures the cyst and disperses the
    fluid therein. A Bible was usually the largest, heaviest book around
    the house.
     
  14. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest


    >No real treatment for it and unfortunately the cyst interferes with the
    >motion of my thumb and impinges on nerves, and so I think riding will just
    >makes it worse.
    >
    >Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    >habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by hitting
    >them with a bible.
    >Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)


    they can be treated with a good wack. or the doc can tear it with a needle and
    drain it. I had a big one on the side of my foot. it got worse for weeks after
    the treatment then went away.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  15. T Scanlin

    T Scanlin Guest

    From experience choose a book with a flexible cover and it is challenging
    doing it yourself!
    The one on my wrist came back and it was time for volume two. Luckily, there
    was no third time.

    "Steve Knight" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > >No real treatment for it and unfortunately the cyst interferes with the
    > >motion of my thumb and impinges on nerves, and so I think riding will

    just
    > >makes it worse.
    > >
    > >Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    > >habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by

    hitting
    > >them with a bible.
    > >Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)

    >
    > they can be treated with a good wack. or the doc can tear it with a needle

    and
    > drain it. I had a big one on the side of my foot. it got worse for weeks

    after
    > the treatment then went away.
    >
    > --
    > Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    > Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    > See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  16. I tried this, boy did that hurt (and it didn't work).
    Steve.

    Gary Jacobson wrote:
    > ...
    > Anyone else had this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    > habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by hitting
    > them with a bible.
    > Maybe I need to consult a nun who rides.)
    >
    > Gary Jacobson
    > Rosendale, NY
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  17. TDWFL

    TDWFL Guest

    >"Gary Jacobson" [email protected] wrote: >Anyone else had
    this problem, and did it lead to a change of *cycling
    >habits*? (It used to be thought that these things could be cured by hitting
    >them with a bible.


    I developed one of these a while back after a particularly exuberant day of
    jumping waves on a jetski among other things. Mine is on the top of my right
    wrist (palm facing down) just to the left of center. Basically several people
    told me to see a doctor - but - they'd had the same problem and whacked it with
    a book. Internet research said that it is the result of fluid buildup in a
    sheath and it can be drained or removed surgically.
    Oddly enough, mine started to subside one day after massaging the forearm
    muscle near my elbow. It gets a little bigger occasionally so I tap it against
    the edge of my desktop. It's a little more controllable than trusting someone's
    book aiming prowess.
    Now I understand why everyone told me to see a doctor after not doing so
    themselves.

    Tim
     
  18. Pistof

    Pistof Guest

    "Dave Salovesh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] opined:
    >
    > > So much for the vaunted angled brackets! I was grossly
    > > deceived about their power to contain even the longest url.

    >
    > Standard practice uses more than just angle brackets. It also includes
    > "url:" prefixed to the actual URI, and harks back to a time when there
    > may have actually been a need to explain that something like
    > http://www.yahoo.com was a URL and not, well, something else. So:
    >
    >

    <url:http://groups.google.com/[email protected]
    ting.google.com&output=gplain>

    <url:http://groups.google.com/[email protected]
    ting.google.com&output=gplain>
     
  19. Pistof

    Pistof Guest

    "Pistof" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dave Salovesh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In <[email protected]>,
    > > [email protected] opined:
    > >
    > > > So much for the vaunted angled brackets! I was grossly
    > > > deceived about their power to contain even the longest url.

    > >
    > > Standard practice uses more than just angle brackets. It also includes
    > > "url:" prefixed to the actual URI, and harks back to a time when there
    > > may have actually been a need to explain that something like
    > > http://www.yahoo.com was a URL and not, well, something else. So:
    > >
    > >

    >

    <url:http://groups.google.com/[email protected]
    > ting.google.com&output=gplain>
    >
    >

    <url:http://groups.google.com/[email protected]
    > ting.google.com&output=gplain>


    url:http://groups.google.com/[email protected]
    ing.google.com&output=gplain
     
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