Garbage disposal & water filtration

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mark Shaw, Jul 17, 2005.

  1. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    As noted in another thread, I'm in the middle of an extensive
    kitchen remodelling project. Actually, it's more of a tear-
    everything-down-to-the-bare-walls-and rebuild project....

    Anyway, I'm down to two decisions: the purchase of a garbage
    disposal and a water-filtration system.

    Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    way. But for all I know perhaps there's one out there that's
    a gotta-have item for the remodeller....

    For years I've used one of those Pur filters that screws onto
    the faucet, and have been happy with it. The new faucet won't
    take it, though, and at any rate we're ready for something
    different. We don't have room for a whole-house system, though,
    so obviously we're looking at the under-sink ones; probably one
    of the type that filter both drinking water to a little spigot
    on the sink as well as the supply to the icemaker in the fridge.

    Any advice or suggestions in these two areas? Thanks!

    --
    Mark Shaw
    ========================================================================
    "Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of [email protected]
    celestial fire called conscience." - George Washington gmail.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    > difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    > way.


    I wouldn't bother with it, besides, you can always add it later.
    Mine is more trouble than it's worth, and I didn't get a cheap
    one, either. Other people will tell you they love theirs.

    Also, in some places, it might be taxable on your sewer bill,
    assuming you have city sewers, you'd have to check with your
    township (whatever). Not advised if you aren't going the
    permit route, like, don't open that can of worms.

    nancy
     
  3. On Sun 17 Jul 2005 07:04:44a, Mark Shaw wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > As noted in another thread, I'm in the middle of an extensive
    > kitchen remodelling project. Actually, it's more of a tear-
    > everything-down-to-the-bare-walls-and rebuild project....
    >
    > Anyway, I'm down to two decisions: the purchase of a garbage
    > disposal and a water-filtration system.
    >
    > Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    > difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    > way. But for all I know perhaps there's one out there that's
    > a gotta-have item for the remodeller....
    >
    > For years I've used one of those Pur filters that screws onto
    > the faucet, and have been happy with it. The new faucet won't
    > take it, though, and at any rate we're ready for something
    > different. We don't have room for a whole-house system, though,
    > so obviously we're looking at the under-sink ones; probably one
    > of the type that filter both drinking water to a little spigot
    > on the sink as well as the supply to the icemaker in the fridge.
    >
    > Any advice or suggestions in these two areas? Thanks!
    >


    As far as a garbage disposal, I would go with In-Sink-Erator. You won't be
    sorry.

    Sears has a variety of undersink water filtration units which consist of
    one or several cartridge filters (depending on what you want to filter).
    They are economical and only require cartrige replacement about once a
    year. They do, however, require a separate small faucet mounted on the
    sink, similar to those used for "instant" hot water.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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  4. "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    > difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    > way.


    Not a necessity but we do use ours at times. If nothing else, it is hand
    instead of clearing peelings or small dropings from a sink stariner. I
    guess it depends on how much the $200 cost is in relationship the the entire
    kitchen remodel and convenience compared to sink ceaning.



    > different. We don't have room for a whole-house system, though,
    > so obviously we're looking at the under-sink ones; probably one
    > of the type that filter both drinking water to a little spigot
    > on the sink as well as the supply to the icemaker in the fridge.
    >
    > Any advice or suggestions in these two areas? Thanks!


    Think outside the kitchen. Where does the cold water line enter the
    kitchen? In my case, it is in the utility room below the kitchen and one of
    the baths. It was very easy to mount a whole house type housing in the
    ceiling and it filters the cold water and refrigerator water. I've see some
    in a laundry room next to the kitchen also. It is just easier than trying
    to change a filter under a cramped sink. All our cold water is filtered in
    the kitchen, not just a little tap for drinking water.
     
  5. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Mark Shaw wrote:
    > As noted in another thread, I'm in the middle of an extensive
    > kitchen remodelling project. Actually, it's more of a tear-
    > everything-down-to-the-bare-walls-and rebuild project....
    >
    > Anyway, I'm down to two decisions: the purchase of a garbage
    > disposal and a water-filtration system.
    >
    > Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    > difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    > way. But for all I know perhaps there's one out there that's
    > a gotta-have item for the remodeller....
    >
    > For years I've used one of those Pur filters that screws onto
    > the faucet, and have been happy with it. The new faucet won't
    > take it, though, and at any rate we're ready for something
    > different. We don't have room for a whole-house system, though,
    > so obviously we're looking at the under-sink ones; probably one
    > of the type that filter both drinking water to a little spigot
    > on the sink as well as the supply to the icemaker in the fridge.
    >
    > Any advice or suggestions in these two areas?


    The water filtration choice is a no-brainer: RO (Reverse Osmosis)... if
    you have a basement install it there... much easier to install and
    service than cramped under the sink,, makes running a line to the
    fridge a smap, and who needs yet another thing under the sink that can
    leak when you're not looking, and cause damage.

    Whether or not an in-sink garbage grinder depends on whether you have
    public sewers or a private septic system.... I wouldn't want to be
    putting any extra garbage into my septic system... and if you're into
    composting then I see no use for a grinder regardless, besides it's
    just something to cause plumbing grief down the road. For very little
    cost, while the walls are open, you can have the electricals installed
    in case you decide on adding the disposal at some later date... and so
    it's not a total waste the the under sink electricals can always be
    used for one of those instant hot water dispenser thingies.
     
  6. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jul 2005 14:04:44 +0000 (UTC), Mark Shaw
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >As noted in another thread, I'm in the middle of an extensive
    >kitchen remodelling project. Actually, it's more of a tear-
    >everything-down-to-the-bare-walls-and rebuild project....
    >
    >Anyway, I'm down to two decisions: the purchase of a garbage
    >disposal and a water-filtration system.
    >
    >Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    >difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    >way. But for all I know perhaps there's one out there that's
    >a gotta-have item for the remodeller....


    If you decide not to install one, make sure however that you put in
    the electrical and plumbing accesses in case you ever change your
    mind.

    Frankly, as long as you're remodeling, why don't you put one in? The
    cost is in the installation and it's going to be much cheaper during a
    remodel.

    Other than that, get one with sufficient horsepower. Mine is a
    Kenmore 3/4 hp and I've never had any trouble with it. It was $99
    five years ago. The cost was in the installation.

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  7. On Sun 17 Jul 2005 07:34:58a, Edwin Pawlowski wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Think outside the kitchen. Where does the cold water line enter the
    > kitchen? In my case, it is in the utility room below the kitchen and
    > one of the baths. It was very easy to mount a whole house type housing
    > in the ceiling and it filters the cold water and refrigerator water.
    > I've see some in a laundry room next to the kitchen also. It is just
    > easier than trying to change a filter under a cramped sink. All our
    > cold water is filtered in the kitchen, not just a little tap for
    > drinking water.
    >


    Ed, I like that idea, but it never occurred to me. What type and size is the
    system you installed?

    TIA

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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  8. "Wayne Boatwright"
    >>

    >
    > Ed, I like that idea, but it never occurred to me. What type and size is
    > the
    > system you installed?
    >
    > TIA


    I have a WaterPik InstaPure filter housing. Actually, two of them. I have
    one on the main line that filters rust from the town water as it travels
    through 100 year old pipes on the way to my house. Then I branch off to
    the kitchen and put the same type of housing but use an IR-10A carbon filter
    for taste and sediment. Just changed it about 15 minutes ago as I was
    reminded that it is due while reading this thread.

    Other brands will work as well, but the IF-10 cartridges work best for me as
    they last longer than other brands. They are about $11 each and I use 3 or
    4 a year. I also recommend you get a housing with clear filter holder.
    Looking at the rust is a reminder of when it should be changed.
     
  9. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    Mark Shaw <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > As noted in another thread, I'm in the middle of an extensive
    > kitchen remodelling project. Actually, it's more of a tear-
    > everything-down-to-the-bare-walls-and rebuild project....
    >
    > Anyway, I'm down to two decisions: the purchase of a garbage
    > disposal and a water-filtration system.
    >
    > Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    > difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    > way. But for all I know perhaps there's one out there that's
    > a gotta-have item for the remodeller....
    >
    > For years I've used one of those Pur filters that screws onto
    > the faucet, and have been happy with it. The new faucet won't
    > take it, though, and at any rate we're ready for something
    > different. We don't have room for a whole-house system, though,
    > so obviously we're looking at the under-sink ones; probably one
    > of the type that filter both drinking water to a little spigot
    > on the sink as well as the supply to the icemaker in the fridge.
    >
    > Any advice or suggestions in these two areas? Thanks!


    While you have everything open, have the electrician install an
    electrical outlet in the cabinet area below the sink... Just in case.
    It's easier to do it now (physically) than it will be when your have
    everything locked down and screwed to the wall tight.

    We have both an In-Sink-Erator 1.0 hp
    <http://www.insinkerator.com/disposer.html> and a water filtration
    system <http://www.geappliances.com/smartwater/model_fs.htm?GXSL55F>.

    I spoke to the plumber and GC about the filtration system because I
    didn't want it going under the sink. Between the three of us, I was able
    to choose the most accessible area for filter replacement without
    worrying whether it would be code or not. The plumber also seconded
    against hiding it under the sink since if it leaked, or more
    importantly, when I needed to change out the filters, I wouldn't need to
    be a member of Cirque du Soleil's contortionists. We settled on placing
    it right outside the kitchen-garage wall, near the water heater.

    I like having both a disposal can't imagine ever going without a
    disposal (did that in our first apt.) You mention that you compost and
    it's not an expense you'd really miss so focus on the filtration system
    and worry about adding a disposal later (if ever.) Just make sure you
    add the electrical now; it will be cheaper.

    The Ranger
     
  10. On Sun 17 Jul 2005 08:19:09a, Edwin Pawlowski wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright"
    >>>

    >>
    >> Ed, I like that idea, but it never occurred to me. What type and size
    >> is the system you installed?
    >>
    >> TIA

    >
    > I have a WaterPik InstaPure filter housing. Actually, two of them. I
    > have one on the main line that filters rust from the town water as it
    > travels through 100 year old pipes on the way to my house. Then I
    > branch off to the kitchen and put the same type of housing but use an
    > IR-10A carbon filter for taste and sediment. Just changed it about 15
    > minutes ago as I was reminded that it is due while reading this thread.
    >
    > Other brands will work as well, but the IF-10 cartridges work best for
    > me as they last longer than other brands. They are about $11 each and I
    > use 3 or 4 a year. I also recommend you get a housing with clear filter
    > holder. Looking at the rust is a reminder of when it should be changed.


    Thanks, Ed. This sounds like what I want to do with my new house after we
    move in. I'm going to look into it.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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  11. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote


    > > Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    > > difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    > > way.


    > I wouldn't bother with it, besides, you can always add it later.


    Oh, I'm definitely going to add one. I can see how the way I
    phrased that might make it seem as though I was considering
    doing without it, though.

    I don't use it that much (we didn't have one when I was growing
    up), but I've got to look ahead to resale value on the house,
    too - and not having one here in suburbia would be weird.

    > Also, in some places, it might be taxable on your sewer bill,
    > assuming you have city sewers, you'd have to check with your
    > township (whatever).


    Not here.

    Thanks, though.

    --
    Mark Shaw
    ========================================================================
    "Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of [email protected]
    celestial fire called conscience." - George Washington gmail.com
     
  12. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    > As far as a garbage disposal, I would go with In-Sink-Erator. You won't be
    > sorry.


    After a bit of research I'm also considering a 1-HP Kenmore.
    But In-Sink-Erator also looks good.

    --
    Mark Shaw
    ========================================================================
    "Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of [email protected]
    celestial fire called conscience." - George Washington gmail.com
     
  13. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    Edwin Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    > > difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    > > way.


    > Not a necessity but we do use ours at times. If nothing else, it is hand
    > instead of clearing peelings or small dropings from a sink stariner. I
    > guess it depends on how much the $200 cost is in relationship the the entire
    > kitchen remodel and convenience compared to sink ceaning.


    $200 is less than one percent of what I'm spending here. It's
    quite a job, and that doesn't include appliances - those are
    running about $6K total (and I'm not replacing the fridge).

    > Think outside the kitchen. Where does the cold water line enter the
    > kitchen? In my case, it is in the utility room below the kitchen and one of
    > the baths. It was very easy to mount a whole house type housing in the
    > ceiling and it filters the cold water and refrigerator water. I've see some
    > in a laundry room next to the kitchen also. It is just easier than trying
    > to change a filter under a cramped sink. All our cold water is filtered in
    > the kitchen, not just a little tap for drinking water.


    Hmm, I'm starting to get to the end of my rope, expense-wise
    (as you might imagine). That sounds like a pretty big add-on.

    --
    Mark Shaw
    ========================================================================
    "Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of [email protected]
    celestial fire called conscience." - George Washington gmail.com
     
  14. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    > The water filtration choice is a no-brainer: RO (Reverse Osmosis)... if
    > you have a basement install it there... much easier to install and
    > service than cramped under the sink,, makes running a line to the
    > fridge a smap, and who needs yet another thing under the sink that can
    > leak when you're not looking, and cause damage.


    No basement. No room at all, really - if I put a system in
    it's going to be an under-the-sink model.

    --
    Mark Shaw
    ========================================================================
    "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new
    discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny....'" - Isaac Asimov
     
  15. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Mark Shaw wrote:
    > Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > The water filtration choice is a no-brainer: RO (Reverse Osmosis)... if
    > > you have a basement install it there... much easier to install and
    > > service than cramped under the sink,, makes running a line to the
    > > fridge a smap, and who needs yet another thing under the sink that can
    > > leak when you're not looking, and cause damage.

    >
    > No basement. No room at all, really - if I put a system in
    > it's going to be an under-the-sink model.


    Sure, but it's far more important to choose *what* than the *where*,
    and what often dictates where. You also need to consider where to run
    the supply to your fridge, often not so simple from the sink. Under
    the kitchen sink is the last place I'd choose, with no basement I'd
    choose an adjacent room space; inside a utility room, a closet, a
    laundry room, anywhere but under the kitchen sink.
     
  16. On Sun 17 Jul 2005 10:34:09a, Mark Shaw wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> As far as a garbage disposal, I would go with In-Sink-Erator. You
    >> won't be sorry.

    >
    > After a bit of research I'm also considering a 1-HP Kenmore.
    > But In-Sink-Erator also looks good.
    >


    I don't think you can go wrong with Kenmore appliances. Regardless of who
    makes products for them, Sears sets their own specs, and they're often better
    than other brands.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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  17. nancree

    nancree Guest

    I can't imagine going without my reverse osmosis water filter. (I got
    mine at Costco). The improved taste of the water is a benefit of
    course, but the BEST thing about it is that it filters out that
    lime/calcium/whatever sediment that used to settle in my potted plants
    and in my coffee-maker.
    I have been using the same coffee-maker for 7 YEARS, and I have
    *never* had to clean it with vinegar, not once. I have the filter
    changed once a year, and the cost is less than having bottled water
    delivered.
    Regards, Nancree
     
  18. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    nancree wrote:
    > I can't imagine going without my reverse osmosis water filter. (I got
    > mine at Costco). The improved taste of the water is a benefit of
    > course, but the BEST thing about it is that it filters out that
    > lime/calcium/whatever sediment that used to settle in my potted plants
    > and in my coffee-maker.
    > I have been using the same coffee-maker for 7 YEARS, and I have
    > *never* had to clean it with vinegar, not once. I have the filter
    > changed once a year, and the cost is less than having bottled water
    > delivered.


    Much less than bottled water, not even in the same universe... RO water
    costs about 3¢/gallon. And bottled water isn't nearly as pure, most
    bottled water is very hard and often when tested is found to contain
    unacceptible bacteria counts.

    Learn about RO here: http://www.freedrinkingwater.com


    Sheldon
     
  19. "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> the baths. It was very easy to mount a whole house type housing in the
    >> ceiling and it filters the cold water and refrigerator water. I've see
    >> some
    >> in a laundry room next to the kitchen also. It is just easier than
    >> trying
    >> to change a filter under a cramped sink. All our cold water is filtered
    >> in
    >> the kitchen, not just a little tap for drinking water.

    >
    > Hmm, I'm starting to get to the end of my rope, expense-wise
    > (as you might imagine). That sounds like a pretty big add-on.
    >
    > --
    > Mark Shaw


    $50 or less.
     
  20. Brick

    Brick Guest

    On 17-Jul-2005, Mark Shaw <[email protected]> wrote:

    > As noted in another thread, I'm in the middle of an extensive
    > kitchen remodelling project. Actually, it's more of a tear-
    > everything-down-to-the-bare-walls-and rebuild project....
    >
    > Anyway, I'm down to two decisions: the purchase of a garbage
    > disposal and a water-filtration system.
    >
    > Personally, I don't think the disposal makes that much of a
    > difference. Since we compost, we don't use it that much any-
    > way. But for all I know perhaps there's one out there that's
    > a gotta-have item for the remodeller....
    >
    > For years I've used one of those Pur filters that screws onto
    > the faucet, and have been happy with it. The new faucet won't
    > take it, though, and at any rate we're ready for something
    > different. We don't have room for a whole-house system, though,
    > so obviously we're looking at the under-sink ones; probably one
    > of the type that filter both drinking water to a little spigot
    > on the sink as well as the supply to the icemaker in the fridge.
    >
    > Any advice or suggestions in these two areas? Thanks!
    >
    > --
    > Mark Shaw


    Given your original post Mark, I concluded that you didn't have the space
    for a central (whole house system) anywhere. Mine is 4' high and 18" in
    dia. I installled it in a hall closet where the upper half serves as my
    over-
    flow pantry. I simply spliced into the cold water input under my Mfg'd
    home so everything inside the house is filtered. The outside faucets
    remain unfiltered. The unit has been installed for about three years. It
    uses about 30# of salt a year. I tested my water just a couple of weeks
    ago. It is clean of hardness and iron products, but shows high on akali.
    We get a lot of water interruptions in our neighborhood and before the
    filter, we always got mud after the water was turned back on. No longer.
    The filter takes it all out and then apparently cleans itself when it gets
    damned good and ready. These machines go for about $400.00 at Home
    Despot. We're happy with it.
    --
    The Brick said that (Don't bother to agree with me, I have already changed
    my mind.)

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