Garmin Geko

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Jerry Everetts, Oct 21, 2003.

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  1. Has anybody seen the Garmin Geko? it looks a good bit smaller than an e-trex, I sometimes get lost
    on the trails and a two hour ride turns into an all day "death-march" while trying to find the
    trailhead again. I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was
    thinking of getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?

    Jerry
     
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  2. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was thinking of getting
    > one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?

    Darwin in action?
     
  3. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "John Harlow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was thinking of
    > > getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?
    >
    > Darwin in action?
    >
    >

    Probably rides at Poor Farm. ;^)

    Mike - JH will be the only one to get that.
     
  4. John Harlow wrote:
    >>I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was thinking of getting
    >>one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?
    >
    >
    > Darwin in action?
    >
    >
    Wow, nice shot. I guess I am a whole lot 'stupider' than I though. Thanks for pointing it out!
    Picture this... Central Florida, Ocala National Forest. Over 28000 acres and over 100 miles of tight
    twisty unmarked singletrack through head high Thick underbrush. How would you get in and out without
    occasionally getting lost. Instead of being a mindless prick, with dull comments. How about offering
    some of your vast knowledge up for the rest of us?
     
  5. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > > > I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or
    two.
    > > > I was thinking of getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars.
    > > > Whatdya think?
    > >
    > > Darwin in action?
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Probably rides at Poor Farm. ;^)
    >
    > Mike - JH will be the only one to get that.

    Lol! That spaghetti nest maze of trails reminds me of "Spinal Tap" where the band gets lost in the
    basement of the coliseum. I'd pass the same place 3 times - each time as lost as before. All I could
    think to do is yell "Hello Cleveland!"...
     
  6. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > >>I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was thinking of
    > >>getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?
    > >
    > >
    > > Darwin in action?
    > >
    > >
    > Wow, nice shot. I guess I am a whole lot 'stupider' than I though. Thanks for pointing it out!
    > Picture this... Central Florida, Ocala National Forest. Over 28000 acres and over 100 miles of
    > tight twisty unmarked singletrack through head high Thick underbrush. How would you get in and out
    > without occasionally getting lost. Instead of being a mindless prick, with dull comments. How
    > about offering some of your vast knowledge up for the rest of us?

    Sorry, Jerry; it struck me as odd you claim to repeatedly get lost to the brink of personal
    detriment. You are right though, a glib comment served no use.

    Something which has worked for me is to ride with someone who knows the place well - at least until
    I can figure out how to get out on my own!

    It seems reasonable for the backwoods adventurer type to learn basic navigation skills using a map,
    compass, GPS, water pills and whatever else you might need. Maybe there is a local Search and Rescue
    (SAR) team in your area which can help teach those techniques. I will defer to experts on this
    though as I mostly piddle around in city parks.
     
  7. Jerry Everetts wrote:
    >
    > Has anybody seen the Garmin Geko? it looks a good bit smaller than an e-trex, I sometimes get lost
    > on the trails and a two hour ride turns into an all day "death-march" while trying to find the
    > trailhead again. I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was
    > thinking of getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?
    >
    > Jerry

    I think it's a good idea. I have a eTrex Vista which is a wonderful tool which has helped me a few
    times in the hills. You don't say why you are getting lost though - do you need to brush up on
    navigation skills? The GPS will help & as I have said is a great tool, but it does not replace
    navigational ability. Often in dense woodland you will lose the signal and need to be able to cope
    on your own. A great way to get better at navigation is orienteering. I manage to do a handful of
    day events and a few night ones each year & I find that that keeps me 'honest' and not dependant on
    the technology.

    But the best reason (for me) for going down the GPS route is the ability to plot where you've
    been onto the PC when you get home, stick it on a digital map and plot & plan better routes for
    next time.

    Phil
     
  8. Ouch

    Ouch Guest

    >Has anybody seen the Garmin Geko? it looks a good bit smaller than an e-trex, I sometimes get lost
    >on the trails and a two hour ride turns into an all day "death-march" while trying to find the
    >trailhead again. I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was
    >thinking of getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?
    >
    >Jerry

    I ride with a Magellan GPS unit in my Camelbak. I don't use it on the handlebars for 2 reasons:
    1. I don't have the handle bar mount
    2. I don't rely on the GPS much
    3. Don't want to break it in a fall

    I usually ride in a group and at least one of us has a map and compass which we use to find our way
    around. We've never ridden the same trail twice so it's always new. Only occasionally we reach for
    the GPS to confirm exactly where we are and where we should be headed.

    The Geko seems a good idea to me. From what I hear, the base model (101) isn't a good idea because
    you can't connect it up to a PC but the 201 and 301 are worth having a look at. Alternatively they
    have a new wrist-mounted version called the "Forerunner" which may be of some interest to you too.

    http://www.garmin.com/products/geko301/ (301) http://www.pocketgps.co.uk/garmingeko.php (101 + 201)
    http://www.gps4fun.com/gar_forerunner_201.php
     
  9. John Harlow wrote:
    >>>>I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was thinking of
    >>>>getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Darwin in action?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>Wow, nice shot. I guess I am a whole lot 'stupider' than I though. Thanks for pointing it out!
    >>Picture this... Central Florida, Ocala National Forest. Over 28000 acres and over 100 miles of
    >>tight twisty unmarked singletrack through head high Thick underbrush. How would you get in and out
    >>without occasionally getting lost. Instead of being a mindless prick, with dull comments. How
    >>about offering some of your vast knowledge up for the rest of us?
    >
    >
    > Sorry, Jerry; it struck me as odd you claim to repeatedly get lost to the brink of personal
    > detriment. You are right though, a glib comment served no use.
    >
    > Something which has worked for me is to ride with someone who knows the place well - at least
    > until I can figure out how to get out on my own!
    >
    > It seems reasonable for the backwoods adventurer type to learn basic navigation skills using a
    > map, compass, GPS, water pills and whatever else you might need. Maybe there is a local Search and
    > Rescue (SAR) team in your area which can help teach those techniques. I will defer to experts on
    > this though as I mostly piddle around in city parks.
    >
    >
    It was funny! I was serious about it being a good one. Very nice response as well, rather refreshing
    to see somebody not bother to argue on a newsgroup, now I have a good place to put some well earned
    respect :)

    I used to be a BMX racer until a pretty bad injury, I took up mountain biking for the fun, plus the
    jumps (around here) arent nearly as as severe, I think I want to try and stay closer to the ground
    now that I am pushing 40. I am biking with a co-worker and my 13 year old son, both of which are
    exploring the local areas as well. It really isn't as desperate as I made it sounds, but there are a
    couple of times, when we would much rather be in the car headed home instead of passing that stump
    for the fourh time! And I would say that jumping on a shiny new $3000.00 bike and heading off into
    woods I have never been in before with two bottles of gatorade, and a big ol grin certainly had the
    potential to earn me a Darwin award.

    Jerry
     
  10. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    Jerry Everetts spray painted on a boxcar:
    > Has anybody seen the Garmin Geko? it looks a good bit smaller than an e-trex, I sometimes get lost
    > on the trails and a two hour ride turns into an all day "death-march" while trying to find the
    > trailhead again. I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was
    > thinking of getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?
    >
    > Jerry

    How about just take more water?

    If there's a lot of tree cover chances are pretty good you'll have problems with the signal anyway.
    (I own a GPS, not making this up)

    If it's in the NF... they should have a somewhat current trail map. (?) Around here, each forest
    puts out a trail guide, nothing special in format that lists all the trails and gives rudimentary
    illustrations that coincide with the "official" forest map. These are usually much more accurate
    that the 20 year old un updated topo maps. Call and ask for the recreation person and they should
    send them to you for free.

    Penny
     
  11. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Jerry Everetts" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > John Harlow wrote:
    > >>>>I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or
    two.
    > >>>> I was thinking of getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars.
    > >>>> Whatdya think?
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>Darwin in action?
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>Wow, nice shot. I guess I am a whole lot 'stupider' than I though. Thanks for pointing it out!
    > >>Picture this... Central Florida, Ocala National Forest. Over 28000 acres and over 100 miles of
    > >>tight twisty unmarked singletrack through head high Thick underbrush. How would you get in and
    > >>out without occasionally getting lost. Instead of being a mindless prick, with dull comments.
    > >>How about offering some of your vast knowledge up for the rest of us?
    > >
    > >
    > > Sorry, Jerry; it struck me as odd you claim to repeatedly get lost to
    the
    > > brink of personal detriment. You are right though, a glib comment
    served no
    > > use.
    > >
    > > Something which has worked for me is to ride with someone who knows the place well - at least
    > > until I can figure out how to get out on my own!
    > >
    > > It seems reasonable for the backwoods adventurer type to learn basic navigation skills using a
    > > map, compass, GPS, water pills and whatever
    else
    > > you might need. Maybe there is a local Search and Rescue (SAR) team in
    your
    > > area which can help teach those techniques. I will defer to experts on
    this
    > > though as I mostly piddle around in city parks.
    > >
    > >
    > It was funny! I was serious about it being a good one. Very nice response as well, rather
    > refreshing to see somebody not bother to argue on a newsgroup, now I have a good place to put some
    > well earned respect :)
    >
    > I used to be a BMX racer until a pretty bad injury, I took up mountain biking for the fun, plus
    > the jumps (around here) arent nearly as as severe, I think I want to try and stay closer to the
    > ground now that I am pushing 40. I am biking with a co-worker and my 13 year old son, both of
    > which are exploring the local areas as well. It really isn't as desperate as I made it sounds, but
    > there are a couple of times, when we would much rather be in the car headed home instead of
    > passing that stump for the fourh time! And I would say that jumping on a shiny new $3000.00 bike
    > and heading off into woods I have never been in before with two bottles of gatorade, and a big ol
    > grin certainly had the potential to earn me a Darwin award.
    >
    > Jerry
    >

    No Darwin award for you. You've already had kids. ;^)

    Mike
     
  12. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "John Harlow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > some fla "mountain biker" wrote:
    > > Instead of being a mindless prick<snip>

    Hmmmm, I don't seem to remember Harlow being the mindless prick who is whining about his lack of
    orienteering skills. The Darwinism comment was funny because it's true.

    > It seems reasonable for the backwoods adventurer type to learn basic navigation skills using a
    > map, compass<snip>

    It is reasonable. Our new pal is obviously not a reasonable person. Maybe he should stick to
    sidewalks or get a road bike.

    JD
     
  13. JD wrote:

    > "John Harlow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>some fla "mountain biker" wrote:
    >>
    >>>Instead of being a mindless prick<snip>
    >
    >
    > Hmmmm, I don't seem to remember Harlow being the mindless prick who is whining about his lack of
    > orienteering skills. The Darwinism comment was funny because it's true.
    >
    >
    >>It seems reasonable for the backwoods adventurer type to learn basic navigation skills using a
    >>map, compass<snip>
    >
    >
    > It is reasonable. Our new pal is obviously not a reasonable person. Maybe he should stick to
    > sidewalks or get a road bike.
    >
    > JD

    Your jab is a little late, everything has already gone friendly. Try to keep up...
     
  14. Jd

    Jd Guest

    Jerry Everetts <[email protected]> wrote in message news:

    > Your jab is a little late, everything has already gone friendly. Try to keep up...

    Keep up...that's funny, especially coming from someone who probably couldn't find his ass with a
    handful of toilet paper. Go ride your "mountains".

    JD
     
  15. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > I used to be a BMX racer until a pretty bad injury, I took up mountain biking for the fun, plus
    > the jumps (around here) arent nearly as as severe, I think I want to try and stay closer to the
    > ground now that I am pushing 40.

    You've come to the right place. From what I've seen the vast majority of regulars here are over 40
    (myself included ).

    > I am biking with a co-worker and my 13 year old son, both of which are exploring the local areas
    > as well. It really isn't as desperate as I made it sounds, but there are a couple of times, when
    > we would much rather be in the car headed home instead of passing that stump for the fourh time!

    Lol - I know that feeling, but likely on a much smaller scale!

    > And I would say that jumping on a shiny new $3000.00 bike and heading off into woods I have never
    > been in before with two bottles of gatorade, and a big ol grin certainly had the potential to earn
    > me a Darwin award.

    Hehe - I'll bet it won't be long before you know that place really well. Then I'll come down and get
    *you* to show me around! ;)

    Have fun, and keep us posted on your adventures.
     
  16. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "Jerry Everetts" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Has anybody seen the Garmin Geko? it looks a good bit smaller than an e-trex, I sometimes get lost
    > on the trails and a two hour ride turns into an all day "death-march" while trying to find the
    > trailhead again. I have been seriously worried after running out of fluids a time or two. I was
    > thinking of getting one of these little suckers and putting it on my handlebars. Whatdya think?
    >
    > Jerry

    I have a 201. I haven't used it for navigation yet, just trail mapping so I can't speciffically
    speak to that issue. I just turn it on, put it in the camelbak and turn it off when I'm done riding.
    As far as the unit itself, it's small (about the size of a modern cell phone) and easy to use, but
    I'd get the 201, the 101 has no pc connectivity and the 301 has only two extra features, a compass
    (the 201 does too but you just need to be in motion to activate it, big deal) and an altimeter,
    useless in Florida I would guess. I wouldn't bother putting it on the bars either. Easier to pocket
    it. If you do get one check out the GPSgeek ebayer, makes knockoff power/connector cords that are
    way cheaper than Garmin's.

    Chris
     
  17. JD wrote:
    > Jerry Everetts <[email protected]> wrote in message news:
    >
    >
    >>Your jab is a little late, everything has already gone friendly. Try to keep up...
    >
    >
    > Keep up...that's funny, especially coming from someone who probably couldn't find his ass with a
    > handful of toilet paper. Go ride your "mountains".
    >
    > JD
    hmmmm, that was a clever response. you really showed me. Thanks for playing, and thanks for REALLY
    teaching me a lesson ;)
     
  18. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    Jerry Everetts spray painted on a boxcar:
    > JD wrote:
    >> Jerry Everetts <[email protected]> wrote in message news:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Your jab is a little late, everything has already gone friendly. Try to keep up...
    >>
    >>
    >> Keep up...that's funny, especially coming from someone who probably couldn't find his ass with a
    >> handful of toilet paper. Go ride your "mountains".
    >>
    >> JD
    > hmmmm, that was a clever response. you really showed me. Thanks for playing, and thanks for REALLY
    > teaching me a lesson ;)

    The best GPS lesson I've gotten so far is how unreliable they are under cover moving at speed. I was
    very dissapointed when trying to make a track for one ride that we do that is in very deep forest. I
    think the only way to get that particular 2 mile section would be to walk it slowly, and take lots
    of way pionts manually.

    Penny
     
  19. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Penny S wrote:
    > Jerry Everetts spray painted on a boxcar:
    >
    >>JD wrote:
    >>
    >>>Jerry Everetts <[email protected]> wrote in message news:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Your jab is a little late, everything has already gone friendly. Try to keep up...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Keep up...that's funny, especially coming from someone who probably couldn't find his ass with a
    >>>handful of toilet paper. Go ride your "mountains".
    >>>
    >>>JD
    >>
    >>hmmmm, that was a clever response. you really showed me. Thanks for playing, and thanks for REALLY
    >>teaching me a lesson ;)
    >
    >
    >
    > The best GPS lesson I've gotten so far is how unreliable they are under cover moving at speed. I
    > was very dissapointed when trying to make a track for one ride that we do that is in very deep
    > forest. I think the only way to get that particular 2 mile section would be to walk it slowly, and
    > take lots of way pionts manually.
    >
    > Penny
    >

    Depends on satelite coverage and blockage. I have a 12 channel unit with a spiral antenna (better
    reception, but a little bigger) and usually have good luck -- but not always :). Try it in the
    winter when there are no leaves on the trees (makes more difference than you may think). Try it on a
    day when the GPS shows good satelite coverage (yea, it's the luck of the draw). Move the hills and
    trees that are blocking the satelites :). But, now you know why I also carry a compass :). When the
    GPS's working good, I know right where I am and where I've been. But, I've had times when I really
    wanted to know, but didn't!

    David
     
  20. David Kunz wrote:

    > Penny S wrote:
    >
    >> Jerry Everetts spray painted on a boxcar:
    >>
    >>> JD wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Jerry Everetts <[email protected]> wrote in message news:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Your jab is a little late, everything has already gone friendly. Try to keep up...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Keep up...that's funny, especially coming from someone who probably couldn't find his ass with
    >>>> a handful of toilet paper. Go ride your "mountains".
    >>>>
    >>>> JD
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> hmmmm, that was a clever response. you really showed me. Thanks for playing, and thanks for
    >>> REALLY teaching me a lesson ;)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The best GPS lesson I've gotten so far is how unreliable they are under cover moving at speed. I
    >> was very dissapointed when trying to make a track for one ride that we do that is in very deep
    >> forest. I think the only way to get that particular 2 mile section would be to walk it slowly,
    >> and take lots of way pionts manually.
    >>
    >> Penny
    >>
    >
    > Depends on satelite coverage and blockage. I have a 12 channel unit with a spiral antenna (better
    > reception, but a little bigger) and usually have good luck -- but not always :). Try it in the
    > winter when there are no leaves on the trees (makes more difference than you may think). Try it on
    > a day when the GPS shows good satelite coverage (yea, it's the luck of the draw). Move the hills
    > and trees that are blocking the satelites :). But, now you know why I also carry a compass :).
    > When the GPS's working good, I know right where I am and where I've been. But, I've had times when
    > I really wanted to know, but didn't!
    >
    > David
    >
    HA! did you say winter? where I live, there is no winter, well maybe it gets down to 60 on a really
    chilly day ;) But really, we bike in shorts in January.
     
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