Gatorade A Scam?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Jul 4, 2005.

  1. Is Gatorade a scam? I ask this because it tastes good and I'm not so
    convinced that something that tastes good is the best fluid for the
    body. I think it might very well have to do with selling the stuff.
    Maybe if you tried to sell the most optimal fluid the taste would not
    allow it to sell? Is there any scientific evidence that indicates the
    best fluid for the body after exercise? I don't want to hear it from
    the Gatorade company. Does anyone have an unbiased facts?
     
    Tags:


  2. On 2005-07-05, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Is Gatorade a scam? I ask this because it tastes good


    No it doesn't. One of the regulars calls it "gatorbarf" and I'm
    inclined to agree with him (at least on that item).

    > and I'm not so
    > convinced that something that tastes good is the best fluid for the
    > body.


    A high electrolyte content could make a drink unpalatable (like
    gatorade). The endurance formula has double the electrolytes of
    the original mix, which probably means it tastes even worse (if
    that's possible) but also makes it a better hydration mix.

    > I think it might very well have to do with selling the stuff.
    > Maybe if you tried to sell the most optimal fluid the taste would not
    > allow it to sell?


    Yeah, but they can sidestep that problem by marketting different
    drinks that have variable levels of ickiness.

    > Is there any scientific evidence that indicates the
    > best fluid for the body after exercise?


    No need to be drinking anything as disgusting as gatorade after
    exercise. Just get something that has some protein and carbs, and
    tastes good. I usually pick up some low fat ice cream after a long
    run. Tastes a hell of a lot better than any of the gatorbarf formulas,
    and gets the job done (carbs and protein)

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  3. Ripping off joggers?...........no harm, no foul.
     
  4. >I usually pick up some low fat ice cream after a long run.>

    Dickhead.
     
  5. On 2005-07-05, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I usually pick up some low fat ice cream after a long run.>

    >
    > Dickhead.


    You're just cranky because the other troll (the one who's actually
    funny sometimes) is back. Calm down, have a beer or something (and
    don't water it down).

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  6. >You're just cranky because the other troll (the one who's actually
    funny sometimes) is back.>

    I didn't know Anne was gone.

    >Calm down, have a beer or something (and

    don't water it down).>

    Beer (and ice cream) SUCK! I'm a non-drinker, I smoke bud instead.
    Booze is for losers, and ice cream for fattys.
     
  7. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-07-05, [email protected] <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >> Is Gatorade a scam? I ask this because it tastes good


    Rhetorical but do you normally hate sugar ?

    >
    > No it doesn't. One of the regulars calls it "gatorbarf" and I'm
    > inclined to agree with him (at least on that item).


    I agree will all of Donovan's post. It happens. ;)

    Gatorabarf was a case of perfect timing and incredible marketing. The
    reason it shows up at so many races is cost, either very low or donated.
    Almost every 5k through the marathon that I have run or volunteered
    serves G. It's not until you get into ultra races that you will get a
    better composition drink from maltodextrin.

    Taste is always a factor and very difficult to create the all thrilling
    palate pleaser. When I started running 20 years ago and just like
    today, it was served at every race and always one of the green flavors.
    While you may think it tastes good today, try a steady diet of it over
    time. wait until a marathon where the 25th cup comes out your nose.

    According to Sam the G lab does some great testing which has resulted in
    what I would consider a questionable endurance formula. I have no idea
    about the taste since I find the label alone repulsive. When I compare
    labels all I see is the same 14G of carbs from sugar(and no details in
    either label of the sugar source) with Na going from 110mg to 200mg and
    K 30mg to 90mg. The increase in salt is needed for longer races but I
    question the value of the increase in K. IMO, it's still cheap sugar
    water with more Na and K. If they had changed the source of the carbs I
    might think they were serious about creating a real endurance drink but
    as we all know the bottom line is money and sucrose/fructose keeps the
    cost down and the profits ups.

    -DF
     
  8. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Doug Freese wrote:

    > According to Sam the G lab does some great testing which has resulted in
    > what I would consider a questionable endurance formula. I have no idea
    > about the taste since I find the label alone repulsive. When I compare
    > labels all I see is the same 14G of carbs from sugar(and no details in
    > either label of the sugar source) with Na going from 110mg to 200mg and
    > K 30mg to 90mg. The increase in salt is needed for longer races but I
    > question the value of the increase in K. IMO, it's still cheap sugar
    > water with more Na and K. If they had changed the source of the carbs I
    > might think they were serious about creating a real endurance drink but
    > as we all know the bottom line is money and sucrose/fructose keeps the
    > cost down and the profits ups.


    In reading the "The Endurance Athlete's GUIDE to SUCCESS," a 68 page
    document by Hammer Nutrition
    https://www.e-caps.com/downloads/fuelinghandbook.pdf,
    I came accross something that I never heard of before. Mainly that
    maltodextrin based sports drinks match body fluid osmolality at a much
    higher conentration (15-18%), rather than the normal 6-8% with simple
    sugar-based drinks.

    They recommend (for a body weight of 155-190 pounds) 2.5 to 2.75
    scoops/hour. 2.5 scoops mixed with 12 oz of water would be 250
    calories, 62g of carbs. By my calculatioin this is 17.6% carb
    concentration. Am I missing something here. This seems like quite a
    departure from what I normally reed.

    >From https://www.e-caps.com/downloads/fuelinghandbook.pdf

    "For endurance athletes, the primary problem
    with fuels containing simple sugars is that they
    must be mixed in weak 6-8% solutions in order
    to match body fluid osmolality and thus be
    digested with any efficiency. Unfortunately,
    solutions mixed and consumed at this concentration
    only provide about 100 calories per
    h o u r, totally inadequate for maintaining energy
    production on an hourly basis. Using a 6-8%
    solution to obtain adequate calories means
    your fluid intake becomes so high to cause discomfort,
    bloating, and possibly oversupplying
    your body to the point of fluid intoxication.
    You can't make a "double or triple strength"
    mixture from a simple sugar-based carbohydrate
    fuel in the hopes of obtaining adequate
    calories because the concentration of that
    mixture, now far beyond the 6-8% mark, will
    remain in your stomach until sufficiently
    diluted, which may cause substantial stomach
    distress. You can drink more fluids in the
    hopes of "self diluting" the overly concentrated
    mixture, but remember that you'll increase
    the risk of over-hydration. However, if you
    don't dilute with more water and electrolytes,
    your body will recruit these from other areas
    that critically need them and divert them to
    the digestive system to deal with the concentrated
    simple sugar mix. This can result in a
    variety of stomach-related distresses, not to
    mention increased cramping potential.
    Simply put, simple sugar-based drinks or gels
    have to be mixed and consumed at very dilute
    calorically weak concentrations in order to be
    digested with any efficiency. A simple sugarbased
    product used at a properly mixed
    concentration cannot provide adequate calories
    to sustain energy production. Any way
    you look at it, fuels containing simple sugars
    are an inefficient, inappropriate way to fuel
    your body during prolonged exercise.

    Complex carbohydrates (polysaccharides) are
    the wisest choice for endurance athletes, as
    they allow your digestive system to rapidly
    and efficiently process a greater volume of
    calories, providing steady energy. Unlike simple
    sugars, which match body fluid osmolality
    at 6-8% solutions, complex carbohydrates
    match body fluid osmolality at substantially
    more concentrated 15-18% solutions. Even at
    this seemingly high concentration, complex
    carbohydrates (such as maltodextrins and
    glucose polymers) will empty the stomach at
    the same efficient rate as normal body fluids
    and provide up to three times more energy
    than simple sugar mixtures, which means
    you can fulfill your caloric requirements without
    running the risk of over-hydration or a
    variety of stomach related maladies.

    Recommendation :
    To get the proper amount of easily digested
    calories, rely on fuels that use complex carbohydrates
    (maltodextrins or glucose polymers) only, with no added
    simple sugar as their carbohydrate
    source. Hammer Gel and Hammer
    HEED are ideal for workouts and races of up
    to two hours. For longer workouts and races,
    select Perpetuem or Sustained Energy as your
    primary fuel choice."

    --
    Phil M.
     
  9. Phil said:
    > I came accross something that I never heard of before. Mainly
    > that maltodextrin based sports drinks match body fluid
    > osmolality at a much higher conentration (15-18%), rather than
    > the normal 6-8% with simple sugar-based drinks.


    That is certainly interesting.

    Anecdotally, Hammer Gel is the worst gel or drink I've tried, when it
    comes to my guts' comfort on a long run. Poor experiment: n=1, sloppy
    protocol, only two trials... but I was and remain seriously disinclined
    to give it a third.
     
  10. >I have no idea about the taste since I find the label alone repulsive.>

    You don't eat the label, you DF.
     
  11. >I have no idea about the taste since I find the label alone repulsive.>

    You don't eat the label, you DF.
     
  12. >I have no idea about the taste since I find the label alone repulsive.>

    You don't eat the label, you DF.
     
  13. >I have no idea about the taste since I find the label alone repulsive.>

    You don't eat the label, you DF.
     
  14. >I have no idea about the taste since I find the label alone repulsive.>

    You don't eat the label, you DF.
     
  15. >I have no idea about the taste since I find the label alone repulsive.>

    You don't eat the label, you DF.
     
  16. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Doug Freese" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Gatorabarf was a case of perfect timing and incredible marketing. The
    > reason it shows up at so many races is cost, either very low or donated.
    > Almost every 5k through the marathon that I have run or volunteered
    > serves G. It's not until you get into ultra races that you will get a
    > better composition drink from maltodextrin.
    >



    Many people know that Gatorade was invented by the University of Florida
    for the Florida Gators football team. However, far fewer people know the
    there was a competing product from in-state rival Florida State. Like
    VHS vs. Beta, Gatorade was the inferior product, but it ended up winning
    the marketing war, mostly because no one wanted to drink Seminole Fluid.

    --Harold Buck


    "I used to rock and roll all night,
    and party every day.
    Then it was every other day. . . ."
    -Homer J. Simpson
     
  17. > No it doesn't. One of the regulars calls it "gatorbarf" and I'm
    > inclined to agree with him (at least on that item).

    I agree will all of Donovan's post.
    ---------

    two complaining whining babies. micro-focused on in race hydration
    when in the big picture/scope...most racers probably consume a vast
    array of "mis-steps" 1, 2, and 3 days prior to the event.

    racing in 80 degree heat & 80 on the humidity index....that damn
    gatorade taste damn fine imo...especially in the latter miles. what's
    to complain about? we're not talking before and after race drinks....
    we're talking about the only crap on the table at the time....

    you should know better DF to bitch about gatorade. how many times have
    you raced and grabbed a cup of water from a local intending to do
    well....in front of their house and in the spirit...only to spit out
    that F'ing garden hose piss water?

    i won't bitch about gatorade. that BS has been heavenly to me too many
    times...in desparate points/moments in racing. Gatorade imo is kind of
    like Pegs. I'm not gonna bad mouth Pegs for the same damn reason
    (best option at the time).

    2 months ago in a race...the table was spread with Amino Vital. I saw
    a guy puke that crap out after 1 gulp in stride in a race...

    it ain't a perfect world folks. in my local races. the Grade is
    usually the first set of tables, the water the second....I usually
    might sip the Grade....then grab the water and slam it in my face to
    reinvigorate...
     
  18. Oh Lance, you are SO manly! And mucho macho. What a he'man you are.
     
  19. Sam

    Sam Guest

    Gatorade must taste good since its sales are in the billions of dollars.

    I would say the science is pretty solid. A PubMed search would turn up
    independent answers.


    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-07-05, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Is Gatorade a scam? I ask this because it tastes good

    >
    > No it doesn't. One of the regulars calls it "gatorbarf" and I'm
    > inclined to agree with him (at least on that item).
    >
    >> and I'm not so
    >> convinced that something that tastes good is the best fluid for the
    >> body.

    >
    > A high electrolyte content could make a drink unpalatable (like
    > gatorade). The endurance formula has double the electrolytes of
    > the original mix, which probably means it tastes even worse (if
    > that's possible) but also makes it a better hydration mix.
    >
    >> I think it might very well have to do with selling the stuff.
    >> Maybe if you tried to sell the most optimal fluid the taste would not
    >> allow it to sell?

    >
    > Yeah, but they can sidestep that problem by marketting different
    > drinks that have variable levels of ickiness.
    >
    >> Is there any scientific evidence that indicates the
    >> best fluid for the body after exercise?

    >
    > No need to be drinking anything as disgusting as gatorade after
    > exercise. Just get something that has some protein and carbs, and
    > tastes good. I usually pick up some low fat ice cream after a long
    > run. Tastes a hell of a lot better than any of the gatorbarf formulas,
    > and gets the job done (carbs and protein)
    >
    > Cheers,
    > --
    > Donovan Rebbechi
    > http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  20. Sam

    Sam Guest

    It is true that FSU tried to copy Gatorade and got the formulation okay in
    many ways except taste. The athletes would not drink the stuff.

    Robert Cade is a very rich man--in those days the inventor even at a
    University got to share in the profits. Although it has been sold 3 times
    the original agreement gave Cade and crew royalties in perpertuity---perhaps
    the greatest contract ever written.
    "Harold Buck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Doug Freese" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Gatorabarf was a case of perfect timing and incredible marketing. The
    >> reason it shows up at so many races is cost, either very low or donated.
    >> Almost every 5k through the marathon that I have run or volunteered
    >> serves G. It's not until you get into ultra races that you will get a
    >> better composition drink from maltodextrin.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Many people know that Gatorade was invented by the University of Florida
    > for the Florida Gators football team. However, far fewer people know the
    > there was a competing product from in-state rival Florida State. Like
    > VHS vs. Beta, Gatorade was the inferior product, but it ended up winning
    > the marketing war, mostly because no one wanted to drink Seminole Fluid.
    >
    > --Harold Buck
    >
    >
    > "I used to rock and roll all night,
    > and party every day.
    > Then it was every other day. . . ."
    > -Homer J. Simpson
     
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