Gatorade alternative?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Julia Altshuler, Jul 20, 2005.

  1. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 10:22:42 -0400, Julia Altshuler
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I did something stupid yesterday. I worked outside in the garden,
    >ignored how sweaty, tired and achy I felt, told myself I was just being
    >lazy by putting off necessary work, didn't realize until I was sick, had
    >slept most of the afternoon and was watching the weather reports that I
    >damn near gave myself heat exhaustion by working in the sun on the
    >hottest and most humid day of the year. I was drinking water and orange
    >juice, but not nearly enough. I didn't think of breaking out the
    >Gatorade which I keep on hand until today. Yech! That stuff tastes
    >like medicine. O.K., under the circumstances, it IS medicine, but is
    >there an alternative that doesn't taste so bad? I'd like something that
    >has the proper electrolyte balance and is recommended for treating
    >stomach distress (which I had only a little) and overheating (which I
    >was well on way to).
    >
    >
    >--Lia


    Chicken broth, or beef consomme. You really don't need special
    drinks.

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     


  2. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I didn't think of breaking out the Gatorade which I keep on hand until
    >today. Yech! That stuff tastes like medicine. O.K., under the
    >circumstances, it IS medicine, but is there an alternative that doesn't
    >taste so bad?


    What flavor was it? I can't stand the original lemon-lime flavor, but
    some of the newer flavors (the red, the purple, and the clear "ice")
    aren't bad if they're really cold. If you used the eery yellow-green
    stuff, might want to try another flavor -- my kids and all their friends
    love the newer flavors (not that I give it to them -- they had it at the
    school end-of-year party when one parent donated several cases).

    Chris
     
  3. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 11:10:38 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >For a few summers while attending university I had a summer job in an alloy
    >smelting plant that was so hot we had to wear long underwear and wool coats to
    >protect us from the heat.


    McWane?

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  4. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On 20 Jul 2005 12:21:57 -0700, "Cam" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Julia Altshuler wrote:

    <snip>
    >> like medicine. O.K., under the circumstances, it IS medicine, but is
    >> there an alternative that doesn't taste so bad? I'd like something that
    >> has the proper electrolyte balance and is recommended for treating
    >> stomach distress (which I had only a little) and overheating (which I
    >> was well on way to).
    >>
    >>
    >> --Lia

    >
    >You could have had a V8!! It has the salt and minerals plus some
    >vitamins.
    >
    >Cam


    A great suggestion!!!

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  5. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    >
    > I did something stupid yesterday. I worked outside in the garden,
    > ignored how sweaty, tired and achy I felt, told myself I was just being
    > lazy by putting off necessary work, didn't realize until I was sick, had
    > slept most of the afternoon and was watching the weather reports that I
    > damn near gave myself heat exhaustion by working in the sun on the
    > hottest and most humid day of the year. I was drinking water and orange
    > juice, but not nearly enough. I didn't think of breaking out the
    > Gatorade which I keep on hand until today. Yech! That stuff tastes
    > like medicine. O.K., under the circumstances, it IS medicine, but is
    > there an alternative that doesn't taste so bad? I'd like something that
    > has the proper electrolyte balance and is recommended for treating
    > stomach distress (which I had only a little) and overheating (which I
    > was well on way to).
    >
    > --Lia


    For drinking our drumming practise, which must burn about 1000 calories
    an hour, a solution of a little honey and a little salt in water works
    well. While it does taste a little weird it's better than Gatorade which
    has too much sugar in it to be useful.

    Any pharmacy will carry Pedialyte and similar fluids. Most of those
    taste bad too LOL.

    Moving to the desert certainly kept making me ill. Most local people
    just said plain water or iced tea and eating some salty foods such as
    crisps/chips would do fine.

    Not overdoing it will do even better :0
     
  6. Peter Aitken wrote:

    > Gatorade and similar products are one of the biggest ripoffs in history.
    > Physiologists know that electrolyte loss is never a problem for most people
    > in most situations. Lance Armstrong might need it, but for almost everyone
    > else the activities we engage in do not cause electrolyte problems. Yes you
    > need to drink water, and some sugar keeps the energy up, but potassium etc?
    > No way. Your problem was probably caused by the humidity - if your sweat
    > does not evaporate it does not cool you and you can get overheated.



    I'd always understood Gatorade as a sports drink for regular workouts to
    be a ripoff too. My exercise teacher used to stress that water was what
    people needed. But that was under controlled conditions in an air
    conditioned gym with the teacher monitoring the pace to make sure the
    middle aged ladies didn't overdo it.


    I thought that once symptoms
    started, the heart beating out of the chest, the slight wooziness and
    absent mindedness, the slight nausea, the slight fever, then something
    like Gatorade was appropriate. In any case, I thought it couldn't hurt.
    I only keep it around for times of severe diarrhea. To my credit, I
    didn't let the symptoms get too bad (possibly because I got the tomatoes
    and basil in the ground as I'd vowed to do), not all the way to
    sunstroke. Some of it was surely caused by being hungry in the first
    place, and I did get a shower before heading out in the hot car for
    groceries. It was in the supermarket that I started to wonder if I was
    alright, but I got home, ate a few bites and was able to rest up for the
    afternoon.


    The overwhelming alternative seems to be Pedialyte with a few votes for
    herbal tea and V8. Funny, I like V8 as a basis for tomato soup but
    can't imagine drinking it. Apparently the swamp green original flavor
    is the worst, and that's the one I had. I'm sure not touching the blue.
    Maybe the red. (What has the world come to when we can't think of
    naturally occuring flavor that the artificial stuff is mimicking and so
    resort to describing food with the colors in a Crayola box?)


    And thanks for the story of working in the alloy smelting plant.
    Nothing like that for putting my ordeal in perspective to make me
    realize I don't have it too bad. And to the person who wondered if I
    were a sweet young thing. That's part of the problem. I'm a healthy
    middle aged and having a hard time adjusting to not being able to do to
    myself what I used to when I was younger.


    Thanks to all who wrote.


    --Lia
     
  7. nancree

    nancree Guest

    Peter Aiken wrote:
    Yes you
    need to drink water, and some sugar keeps the energy up, but potassium
    etc? No way."
    ----------------------------
    I, strongly disagree, as well as the doctors and nurses I know.
    Potassium is necessary to keep the muscles, especially the heart
    muscles, working. Orange juice or a banana are helpful. But best of
    all is powdered Gatorade. I pack baggies of it in my luggage when I
    travel. (After a prolonged attack of diarrhea, in South America, I
    finally got back to my suitcase. The Gatorade, within minutes,
    restored my rubbery legs to normal function). I keep a plastic can of
    powdered Gatorade in my kitchen. (I find the orange flavor is best.)
    It tastes OK--I use a lot of powder in a small amount of water, get it
    down, and then follow that with a lot of plain water.I recommend it.
    Regards, Nancree
     
  8. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    > I did something stupid yesterday. I worked outside in the garden,
    > ignored how sweaty, tired and achy I felt, told myself I was just
    > being lazy by putting off necessary work, didn't realize until I was
    > sick, had slept most of the afternoon and was watching the weather
    > reports that I damn near gave myself heat exhaustion by working in
    > the sun on the hottest and most humid day of the year. I was
    > drinking water and orange juice, but not nearly enough.


    Salt tablets. They issue them to military folks to help keep them hydrated.
    Failing that, drink a disgusting glass of cold water with 1 tsp. salt
    dissolved in it. Yes, it tastes nasty but it will help you prevent losing
    fluids. You should of course consult your physician prior to taking any
    advice given here.

    Jill
     
  9. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    >
    >
    > Salt tablets. They issue them to military folks to help keep them hydrated.
    > Failing that, drink a disgusting glass of cold water with 1 tsp. salt
    > dissolved in it. Yes, it tastes nasty but it will help you prevent losing
    > fluids. You should of course consult your physician prior to taking any
    > advice given here.


    I wouldn't recommend drinking a glass of salt water. When I used to take salt
    tablets I took them with as little water as it took to wash them down. Otherwise
    there was a good chance that everything would come flying back out. What I do
    these days is just have a lick of salt, minus the tequila. As long as the salt
    tastes good it means that you need it. If you don't really need it it tastes....
    salty.
     
  10. Alexis

    Alexis Guest

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    > I did something stupid yesterday. I worked outside in the garden,
    > ignored how sweaty, tired and achy I felt, told myself I was just being
    > lazy by putting off necessary work, didn't realize until I was sick, had
    > slept most of the afternoon and was watching the weather reports that I
    > damn near gave myself heat exhaustion by working in the sun on the
    > hottest and most humid day of the year. I was drinking water and orange
    > juice, but not nearly enough. I didn't think of breaking out the
    > Gatorade which I keep on hand until today. Yech! That stuff tastes
    > like medicine. O.K., under the circumstances, it IS medicine, but is
    > there an alternative that doesn't taste so bad? I'd like something that
    > has the proper electrolyte balance and is recommended for treating
    > stomach distress (which I had only a little) and overheating (which I
    > was well on way to).
    >
    >
    > --Lia


    A lot of folks have recommended Pedialyte. I personally don't care for
    it, but it's good for the stomach distress part of your request, so the
    rest of this might be a matter of "for future reference." I like plain
    bottled water for ongoing, throughout the day drinking, but for
    replacing fluids and other good stuff before, during, and after extreme
    exercise/sweat (which I do on a fairly regular basis) I prefer a
    powered drink called Gookenaide Hydrolyte. It comes in several
    flavors, and IMO works better (anecdotal, based only on my own
    "feelings") and tastes much better than Gatorade. When I'm doing a
    shorter (<20 mile) cycle, my water bottle is filled with the Gookenaide
    and my Camlebak is plain water. For longer cycles (20-100+ miles at
    once, where, if I'm not careful, I'll drop 5-7 pounds strictly in water
    weight) my Camelbak is Gookenaide and my water bottle is plain water.

    Alexis.
     
  11. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    > I did something stupid yesterday.

    <snip>

    Take a large glass, and fill to the top with ice and then water. Add
    1-2 T orange juice concentrate, and a pinch of table salt. Stir well.

    This is the recipe I used when I trained for a triathalon.

    -L.
     
  12. Here's what I've learned from my ordeal:


    Raspberry-Banana First Aid


    1. (May be prepared months in advance.) Pick more raspberries than you
    could possibly eat during the week that they're in season. Rinse
    thoroughly and remove Japanese beetles. Squish beetles between fingers.
    Enjoy the squooshy cracky sound they make as they die. (Squeamish
    folks may place beetles in handkerchief before squishing.) Puree
    raspberries in blender adding only enough water as necessary to make
    blender work. Pour through strainer to remove seeds. Stir with a spoon
    to press puree through strainer. Pour seedless puree into ice cube
    trays. Remove to ziploc bag, and save until needed.


    2. (For first-aid.) Place one ripe banana, 3 raspberry cubes and
    enough orange juice to cover the blades into a blender. Also add a
    pinch of salt. Blend. Add honey to taste.


    3. Serve in tall glasses with plastic straws.


    --Lia
     
  13. guy f klose

    guy f klose Guest

    For what it's worth, a long time ago I saw a morning show that was interviewing Martina Navratilova.
    For those that don't remember her early years, she was always a fine tennis player, but about half-
    way through her career she started working with a nutritionist and special trainers which not only
    helped her prolong her elite career, but helped keep her at the top of the rankings.

    On this show, the host asked her about what she drank (since Gatorade was so popular at the time) and
    I remember her talking about her nutritionist developing something for her, which was much simpler.
    The recipe was so simple, I still remember it...it was 2C of cold water, 2tsp of frozen orange juice
    concentrate and a pinch of salt.

    I remember her specifically talking about how cold water is absorbed more quickly, but over the years
    I've heard others say that room temp water is absorbed more quickly, so I figure to each his own.
    When I'm hot, I like ice-cold.
     
  14. George

    George Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    >
    > Salt tablets. They issue them to military folks to help keep them hydrated.
    > Failing that, drink a disgusting glass of cold water with 1 tsp. salt
    > dissolved in it. Yes, it tastes nasty but it will help you prevent losing
    > fluids. You should of course consult your physician prior to taking any
    > advice given here.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >

    Salt doesn't keep you hydrated water does. We have a built in indicator
    to tell us if we need to drink more water. The standard orders are to
    observe the urine color and to drink more water if it is yellow. Extra
    salt is not normally required if food containing salt is eaten.
     
  15. George

    George Guest

    Peter Aitken wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    > Gatorade and similar products are one of the biggest ripoffs in history.
    > Physiologists know that electrolyte loss is never a problem for most people
    > in most situations. Lance Armstrong might need it, but for almost everyone
    > else the activities we engage in do not cause electrolyte problems. Yes you
    > need to drink water, and some sugar keeps the energy up, but potassium etc?
    > No way. Your problem was probably caused by the humidity - if your sweat
    > does not evaporate it does not cool you and you can get overheated.
    >
    >


    Even the army agrees. Here are a few excerpts from:
    http://www.usariem.army.mil/nutri/nuadhot.htm

    Thirst alone is not a good indicator of adequate fluid intake so
    soldiers will always need to drink before they feel thirsty.

    Plain water is the beverage of choice. Glucose-electrolyte beverages may
    be useful under unusual conditions such as energy expenditure with
    restricted food intake.

    The amount of salt lost in sweat varies depending on a person's degree
    of acclimatization. As the body adjusts, or acclimatizes to the heat,
    sweat contains less salt. Military rations under most circumstances
    contain adequate amounts of salt but additional salt may be lightly
    added to food during the first few days of heat acclimatization using
    the salt packets provided with the rations.
     
  16. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 08:37:46 -0400, Julia Altshuler
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Here's what I've learned from my ordeal:
    >
    >
    >Raspberry-Banana First Aid
    >
    >
    >1. (May be prepared months in advance.) Pick more raspberries than you
    >could possibly eat during the week that they're in season. Rinse
    >thoroughly and remove Japanese beetles. Squish beetles between fingers.
    > Enjoy the squooshy cracky sound they make as they die. (Squeamish
    >folks may place beetles in handkerchief before squishing.) Puree
    >raspberries in blender adding only enough water as necessary to make
    >blender work. Pour through strainer to remove seeds. Stir with a spoon
    >to press puree through strainer. Pour seedless puree into ice cube
    >trays. Remove to ziploc bag, and save until needed.
    >
    >
    >2. (For first-aid.) Place one ripe banana, 3 raspberry cubes and
    >enough orange juice to cover the blades into a blender. Also add a
    >pinch of salt. Blend. Add honey to taste.


    >3. Serve in tall glasses with plastic straws.


    Shouldn't that be first "ade"?

    Maybe I'll go out in the backyard and work hours in the hot sun
    without sustenance just so I can take some of this treatment :>


    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  17. If you are overheated, cool drinks are a good choice to help you feel
    better. But if you drink too much straight water, you run the risk of
    water intoxication, where you drink so much water, you dilute the level
    of electrolytes already in your body. The levels will dip to dangerous
    levels. Replacing the electrolytes is essential. I've only tried
    Gatorade once, during a bout of bronchitis. It was one of the more
    revolting things I've tried in my life. I would choose a banana for
    potassium replacement, because bananas offer lots of nutrients. For
    the sodium replacement? Um, salt tablets are hard to find. My mother
    takes them (for another condition), and we used to order them from
    Planetrx.com, before they folded. Drugstores have to specially order
    them, a major pain. The pharmacist often will order the smaller, more
    expensive 100 tablet bottles, which last less than a month. Or they
    will order sodium bicarbonate instead of sodium chloride. Arrggh!
    Maybe a half teaspoon of salt mixed with a little honey, to make it
    easier to get down, followed by the banana?

    Jacqueline, ICU nurse
     
  18. Curly Sue wrote:

    > Shouldn't that be first "ade"?
    >
    > Maybe I'll go out in the backyard and work hours in the hot sun
    > without sustenance just so I can take some of this treatment :>



    I just measured the capacity of an ordinary 14-cube ice cube tray. Mine
    hold just under 2 cups making each cube roughly 1 ounce. In the past 3
    days, I've picked enough raspberries for 7 trays' worth of raspberry
    cubes or about 3 quarts of puree. That's probably 6 quarts of
    raspberries. Can someone see some irony here? I've been out working in
    the sun picking raspberries in order to process them into something I
    can drink as an antidote to working in the sun.


    For true first ade (thanks for that spelling correction), the banana,
    orange juice and berries are a good idea, but there should be more
    water, maybe 1 banana, 3 raspberries cubes and 3 ice cubes. Besides,
    I'm starting to find the raspberry flavor very concentrated.


    Tomorrow I'll be outside picking berries again, but I've figured out
    that it has to happen before 9:00 in the morning.


    --Lia
     
  19. On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 10:22:42 -0400, Julia Altshuler
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >has the proper electrolyte balance and is recommended for treating
    >stomach distress (which I had only a little) and overheating (which I
    >was well on way to).


    I got this from my doctor about two weeks ago when I was nauseated and
    dehydrated. It's the mix recommended by the World Health Organization for
    rehydrating. It tastes foul, but it eased my nausea after two small sips.
    It tastes better cold:

    1 litre water
    5 tsp sugar
    2 tsp salt
    2 tsp jello powder

    Take small sips every five minutes.

    This is easier on your tummy than plain water and it restores hydration
    fairly rapidly.

    --
    Siobhan Perricone
    "You know, I used to think it was awful that life was so unfair; then I
    thought, 'Wouldn't it be much worse if life *were* fair, and all the
    terrible things that happened to us come because we actually deserved
    them?' So now I take great comfort in the general hostility and
    unfairness of the universe."
    - Marcus, Babylon 5, "A Late Delivery from Avalon"
     
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