Gear and chain oil



SourDieseL

New Member
May 27, 2008
19
0
0
alienator said:
That makes sense, although I've never experienced that. My Look 595, right now, has muddy water dried all over the down tube, seat tube, and chainstays. She is, after all, a working girl.

I really don't have another +4k to drop on another bike, my lifestyle doesn't afford it. My belief is to keep and maintain a good machine and it'll treat me right. I expect her to take me through next year's NY Tri (yes doing a tri with a roadie) as well as many more century rides.
 

alienator

Well-Known Member
Jun 10, 2004
12,596
310
0
SourDieseL said:
I really don't have another +4k to drop on another bike, my lifestyle doesn't afford it. My belief is to keep and maintain a good machine and it'll treat me right. I expect her to take me through next year's NY Tri (yes doing a tri with a roadie) as well as many more century rides.

I'm not exactly flush with cash, and I certainly don't have the money to replace my bike. However, following my usual standard of care, my Campy Record component group is still functioning perfectly after 4 years; my frame is perfectly fine; the wheels roll true and free; and my chains, which only get a drop/link of ProLink every 100-150 miles, still last a very long time. The current chain is approaching the 5,000 mile mark w/ no extra love needed.
 

dhk2

Well-Known Member
Aug 8, 2006
2,214
74
48
75
I follow about the same maintenance routine as Alienator, with fine results. My chain and cassette get a real cleaning about once a year. Rest of the time, Prolink is all it takes, with an occaisional wipe-down with a rag when the chain looks dirty. Certainly would clean the drivetrain often if I thought that helped extend life, but IMO all frequent cleaning does is enhance the bling factor.

Understand some people enjoy cleaning and seeing a shiny cassette and chain at the start of every ride. As long as you're not using any strong solvents or alkali or phosphate-based cleaners, frequent cleaning probably won't hurt anything.
 

64Paramount

Well-Known Member
Jul 25, 2009
1,640
62
0
dhk2 said:
I follow about the same maintenance routine as Alienator, with fine results. My chain and cassette get a real cleaning about once a year. Rest of the time, Prolink is all it takes, with an occaisional wipe-down with a rag when the chain looks dirty. Certainly would clean the drivetrain often if I thought that helped extend life, but IMO all frequent cleaning does is enhance the bling factor.

Understand some people enjoy cleaning and seeing a shiny cassette and chain at the start of every ride. As long as you're not using any strong solvents or alkali or phosphate-based cleaners, frequent cleaning probably won't hurt anything.

I do about the same routine too, except that I still use Tri Flow with teflon ( I probably will use it till it's used up ) and I only lube about once a month, unless something unusual happens.

I usually don't clean the chain, chain rings, or cassette during riding season.

But, I will wipe down the frame, seat, handle bars, wheels, tires, etc with a damp cloth a couple of times. I usually use Meguiar's NXT spray wax on the frame, just to add some protection and shine.

During the winter they each spend time on the repair stand getting thoroughly cleaned, that's when I usually clean and re-lube the greasy parts and I put a couple of coats of Meguiar's NXT paste wax on the frames and rub down a lot of the unpainted/unchromed metal parts with Eagle One.
 

nbfman

New Member
Sep 12, 2005
183
0
0
A few questions on chain maintenance:

1. How often do you find yourself cutting a chain over the course of its life, and why do you do it?
2. How many of you use the Park Tools CM-5 chain scrubber? If not, are there other tools or cleaning methods you would recommend?

I just bought some replacement pins for a 10s Ultegra chain so that I could explore maintenance with the chain removed. It seems like cutting the chain too often would accelerate its deterioration, though I can see how it can allow for better cleaning. For my standards of "clean", I could see myself never cutting the chain, except for when it needs replacement. I'm curious to know the norms of others out there, though. Can any of you remember the approximate number of times you cut the same chain before finally replacing it?

For routine chain cleaning, I had been using the CM-5 scrubber, which worked great until it got left behind during a recent move. So, I'm looking into cleaning methods. I might just get the same tool again, but I'm interested to try something different.

Thanks for any info.
 

alienator

Well-Known Member
Jun 10, 2004
12,596
310
0
nbfman said:
A few questions on chain maintenance:Can any of you remember the approximate number of times you cut the same chain before finally replacing it?

Generally once, but my link has a removable link.
 
Jun 6, 2006
1,696
6
38
alienator said:
....and my chains, which only get a drop/link of ProLink every 100-150 miles, still last a very long time. The current chain is approaching the 5,000 mile mark w/ no extra love needed.
I am wondering if Record chain has significantly smaller clearances than 105. If you flex your chain from side to side in your hands, do you hear/feel any sand or grit inside? That'll usually get me to clean a chain.

Of course, maybe some people are better than me about riding inside the white line where cars keep the road swept, but I wonder if it's possible to get 5,000 miles with that condition.
 

nbfman

New Member
Sep 12, 2005
183
0
0
alienator said:
Generally once, but my link has a removable link.

Can you say which brand of removable link and whether you'd recommend it? I'm assuming it's for Campy Record from other posts.

I was also looking into what was needed to cut my Campy 10s chain and was shown a short piece of chain at the LBS. They said that I needed to replace part of the chain with it, but it was very pricey. The alternative they showed was the removable link. However, they said that the link caused its own noise, which was a problem for some. I decided I'd better wait for next time, but still think the removable link is a good idea and would like to learn more.

Thanks,
 

dhk2

Well-Known Member
Aug 8, 2006
2,214
74
48
75
Only shorten the chain when it's new, never take a chain off for cleaning. Have used SRAM with the master link, but prefer Shimano chains now. Although I've never ruined a Shimano chain when shortening or re-connecting it, imo it's an unnecessary risk and expense to do this routinely for cleaning since I don't believe in soaking or deep-cleaning a chain anyway.

Have a Performance-brand chain cleaner "machine", and admit I used it after returning from a trip to NM and CO this summer. Must be more grit out west than we have here in the humid south, because the drivetrain was really pretty dirty and gritty after 500 miles out there.

Concerning cleaning on the rest of the bike, I do try to wash sweat and sport drink off the frame tubes after every long ride, to prevent corrosion of the aluminum. Plus, it gets a good overall wash with detergent about once a month. Just keeping the finish clean seems to be enough: paint still looks fine after 5 years although it's never been waxed.

Note, not here to convince anyone to change their cleaning rituals, but just sharing mine.
 

alienator

Well-Known Member
Jun 10, 2004
12,596
310
0
I don't use a Record chain. Instead I'm using a KMC X10 SL, and all KMC chains come with a removable link.

The only real problem I get with grit is when the winds are blowing. You can imagine that in the desert, we've got plenty of stuff that can go airborne. I've found, though, that doing 2 laps of the chain w/ ProLink when the dust and sand have been really blowing.........well, i've found that cleans the chain really well.

When this chain is done I'm gonna get a Campy UN chain. It's been quite a while since I've had any experience with a Shimano chain.
 
Dec 30, 2007
2,111
8
0
garage sale GT said:
I am wondering if Record chain has significantly smaller clearances than 105. If you flex your chain from side to side in your hands, do you hear/feel any sand or grit inside? That'll usually get me to clean a chain.

Of course, maybe some people are better than me about riding inside the white line where cars keep the road swept, but I wonder if it's possible to get 5,000 miles with that condition.

All 10s chains are the same dimension. shimano 10s chains work well, are not that expensive, I recommend the 105 level chain. Also the Veloce/Centaur chain iffa ya gotta have Campagnolo(almost twice the $).

Stay away from sram 10s chains, IMHO. Way to many instances of them breaking for me to sell them.
 

ayaussi

New Member
Sep 17, 2009
1
0
0
Hi all! I'm new to this forum but not new to the cycling world, so I thought I might put my 2 cents in about this topic. I enjoyed reading everyone's recommendations of chain/gear lube, but noticed the one I use wasn't listed. I, too, steer clear of WD-40 as it's been known to corrode chains. Instead I use Jig-A-Loo. It's a dry silicone-based lubricant that can be used on almost anything. As someone else posted above, why not get your money's worth out of a product you can easily use on a multitude of other tasks? Just my opinion.
 
Jun 6, 2006
1,696
6
38
All 10s chains are the same dimension. shimano 10s chains work well, are not that expensive, I recommend the 105 level chain. Also the Veloce/Centaur chain iffa ya gotta have Campagnolo(almost twice the $).

Stay away from sram 10s chains, IMHO. Way to many instances of them breaking for me to sell them.
Sure, they're functionally interchangeable, but what if, say, the rollers (for example) have a greater diametral or width tolerance, allowing more grit in?

My chain failed the "crunch test" after a brief jaunt around the south shore of Lake Michigan. I had Finish Line on there, and not too much of it.
 
Dec 30, 2007
2,111
8
0
garage sale GT said:
Sure, they're functionally interchangeable, but what if, say, the rollers (for example) have a greater diametral or width tolerance, allowing more grit in?

My chain failed the "crunch test" after a brief jaunt around the south shore of Lake Michigan. I had Finish Line on there, and not too much of it.

Donno. I like the 'least expensive compatible chain and cogset' rule tho. They are consumables and a higher priced spread doesn't do anything a cheaper one doesn't do.
 

biker jk

New Member
Oct 24, 2005
123
0
0
All 10s chains are the same dimension. shimano 10s chains work well, are not that expensive, I recommend the 105 level chain. Also the Veloce/Centaur chain iffa ya gotta have Campagnolo(almost twice the $).

Stay away from sram 10s chains, IMHO. Way to many instances of them breaking for me to sell them.

In my experience, Shimano 105 chains are prone to rusting and now I use the Ultegra chain which is only a little more expensive and less prone to rusting due to a zinc-alloy finish.