Geek count

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mr. Alan Paterson, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Kevin Stone
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > "Simon Brooke" wrote:
    >
    >>>http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    >
    > Quote: I don't have a computer virus - I don't run an operating system
    > which is vulnerable to them - so there's no need to mail me to tell me
    > I have.
    >
    > I love this, I challenge you to name your operating system!


    Debian GNU/Linux stable.

    Now I challenge you to name a Linux virus which has _ever_ been seen in
    the wild.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Usenet: like distance learning without the learning.
     


  2. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:


    >
    > Debian GNU/Linux stable.
    >
    > Now I challenge you to name a Linux virus which has _ever_ been seen in
    > the wild.


    wine?


    ;-)

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  3. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Kevin Stone <[email protected]> wrote:
    : "Arthur Clune" wrote:

    :> I went the other way - from a maths department to computers. Being a
    :> RA is not fun when you have a mortage to pay.

    : Ah, the joys of no mortgage and simple life style.

    I have a simple life style really by modern standards. No car, no non-mortgage
    debt, no stress, no kids. However even without the mortage the way RAs are
    treated would have got to me. Renting loses its appeal after you get
    chucked out by the landlord because he wants the house back.
    At least if I keep paying the bank money they won't chuck me out.

    I had 7 contracts in 3 years. Then a months unemployment. Then two 6 month
    contracts. Then I gave it up as a bad job. In all that time I was doing
    exactly the same thing.

    There's no reason at all IMO why Universities shouldn't just employ RAs on
    proper (permanant) contracts. Also the whole "you have to move around" to stand any
    chance of getting a lecturership thing. Why should I? And when you're
    (finally) a lecturer you get to spend more time doing teaching and admin than
    research. While still having to produce the same amount of research
    or you won't do well in the RAE.

    Nah. I wasn't dedicated enough to maths for that. Good for those that are
    but I prefer being out of it.

    Hm. More of a rant than I intended........

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Colin
    McKenzie ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Mr. Alan Paterson wrote:
    >
    >> OK, how many people reading this NG ( like me ) work with computers
    >> as a profession.?

    >
    > Not any more: my last IT customer hasn't phoned for months and I'm
    > filling all my time very successfully with cycling-related work.
    >
    > A more interesting Q might be how people found out about Usenet - I'd
    > guess most people came across it first at work rather than at home.


    I didn't discover Usenet until about 1986; from about 1988 I ran a news
    server at home over a UUCP link; I didn't actually switch to using NNTP
    over IP at home until about 1995. These days I have a leased line into
    the house, and there's a rack of six real Internet servers behind me as
    I type. However we're just about to switch to a satellite downlink to
    increase our bandwidth.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    .::;===r==\
    / /___||___\____
    //==\- ||- | /__\( MS Windows IS an operating environment.
    //____\__||___|_// \|: C++ IS an object oriented programming language.
    \__/ ~~~~~~~~~ \__/ Citroen 2cv6 IS a four door family saloon.
     
  5. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <[email protected]>, Kevin Stone
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> "Simon Brooke" wrote:
    >>
    >>>> http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    >>
    >> Quote: I don't have a computer virus - I don't run an operating
    >> system which is vulnerable to them - so there's no need to mail me
    >> to tell me I have.
    >>
    >> I love this, I challenge you to name your operating system!

    >
    > Debian GNU/Linux stable.


    Good choice :).
     
  6. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:

    > There's no reason at all IMO why Universities shouldn't just employ RAs on
    > proper (permanant) contracts. Also the whole "you have to move around" to stand any
    > chance of getting a lecturership thing. Why should I? And when you're
    > (finally) a lecturer you get to spend more time doing teaching and admin than
    > research. While still having to produce the same amount of research
    > or you won't do well in the RAE.


    For all their imperfections, the govt research labs do seem to have a
    significant edge over universities - higher salaries, better working
    conditions, no teaching, many more 'permanent' positions - although
    nothing is really permanent these days, at least there are some
    procedures and some redundancy pay for those who do lose their jobs. I
    worked in a university briefly once and thought it was shit.

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  7. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

  8. jacob

    jacob Guest

  9. garryb59

    garryb59 Guest

  10. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in news:H4SdnZs2B-
    [email protected]:

    > we are lab technicians, so I don't think I
    > would count.
    >


    I didn't think lab technicians could count at all. :)
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    Sorry, you left the door wide open on that one, I know it was totally
    unwarranted.
     
  11. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "Mr. Alan Paterson" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > OK, how many people reading this NG ( like me ) work with computers as a
    > profession.?



    I'm a "resting" computer consultant. Mind you, the "resting" involves
    studying to upgrade some of my certifications and searching for a job.
    Bloody hard to break into the local job market over here :-(

    Graeme
     
  12. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 15:22:52 GMT, "Mr. Alan Paterson"
    <[email protected]> wrote (more or less):

    >OK, how many people reading this NG ( like me ) work with computers as a
    >profession.?
    >
    >Quite a few I'd bet.


    I've been a senior development manager (i.e. the software development
    project managers reported to me) in a b/i/i/ig bank.

    But I'm a student again now. And only part of its geeky! (I'm doing
    social science-y stuff too!)

    Euan, Cert. Soc. Sci. (Open)


    --
    Cheers,
    Euan
    Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr
    Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122
    Smalltalk links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk) http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  13. Pete whelan

    Pete whelan Guest

    nope, use computers, but not my main line of work which is Telecoms
    protection, so get to play with dangerous voltages and currents

    Mr. Alan Paterson wrote:
    > OK, how many people reading this NG ( like me ) work with computers as a
    > profession.?
    >
    > Quite a few I'd bet.
    >
    >
     
  14. Stan Cox

    Stan Cox Guest

    Zog The Undeniable wrote:

    > John Hearns wrote:
    >
    >> Cough. I build, manage and feed Beowulf clusters for a living.
    >>

    > Imagine a...oh, never mind.
    >
    > (if you don't read Slashdot, this will be meaningless)


    You mean there are people who dont read Slashdot. (shakes head)

    Stan Cox
     
  15. On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 21:35:03 GMT, Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <[email protected]>, Kevin Stone
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> "Simon Brooke" wrote:
    >>
    >>>>http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    >>
    >> Quote: I don't have a computer virus - I don't run an operating system
    >> which is vulnerable to them - so there's no need to mail me to tell me
    >> I have.
    >>
    >> I love this, I challenge you to name your operating system!

    >
    > Debian GNU/Linux stable.
    >
    > Now I challenge you to name a Linux virus which has _ever_ been seen in
    > the wild.


    For example:

    Linux.OSF.8759
    Linux.RST
    Worm.Linux.Adm
    Worm.Linux.Cheese
    Worm.Linux.Mighty
    Worm.Linux.Ramen
    Worm.Linux.Slapper

    http://www.viruslibrary.com/virusinfo/Linux.htm

    I can't tell if these have been seen in the wild, but they do contradict
    the "I don't run an operating system that is vulnerable ... Debian GNU/Linux"

    You do run an operating system that is vulnerable to them, but also
    run an operating system that is not as targeted as the most popular
    by default one is. It is even true to say that it may be *less*
    vulnerable, because there are good reasons why it is less vulnerable,
    but it is not true to say it is not vulnerable.

    Line any virus/infection path there has to be enough hosts out there
    to ensure that each infection results in at least two new infections,
    and as yet the number of particularly vulnerable Linux hosts is low (home
    machines badly connected to the internet). Also linux users at the moment
    tend to be more technically savvy. However, if linux was as popular as
    its leading competitor it would be much more vulnerable than at present.

    Google "linux viruses".

    --
    Trevor Barton
     
  16. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:

    > I went the other way - from a maths department to computers. Being a RA is
    > not fun when you have a mortage to pay.


    Sounds familiar... I didn't have the mortgage at the time but did find
    a succession of 6 and 12 month contracts rather on the insecure side.
    So I changed employer from university to NHS (we're a department with 2
    hats) to do the department IT officer job officially, rather than just
    "in practice" while procrastinating about work I didn't want to do on my
    PhD (which I subsequently abandoned).
    Didn't get another 3 letters after my name, but did get a job. Rather
    more useful in the longer term for me!

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  17. MSeries

    MSeries New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am also an IT Professional and have been since 1986. Mostly development of large Enterprise Applications on mainframes and *nix. Started using usenet in 1984 at Uni but all I could find were computer related or Deadhead and Trekky groups.
     
  18. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    James Annan <[email protected]> wrote:

    : For all their imperfections, the govt research labs do seem to have a
    : significant edge over universities - higher salaries, better working
    : conditions, no teaching, many more 'permanent' positions - although

    My friends that work at the CSL lab near here get paid less than Uni
    researchers, but indeed have permnant jobs and no teaching.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  19. Roos Eisma

    Roos Eisma Guest

    James Annan <[email protected]> writes:

    >Arthur Clune wrote:


    >> There's no reason at all IMO why Universities shouldn't just employ RAs on
    >> proper (permanant) contracts. Also the whole "you have to move around" to stand any
    >> chance of getting a lecturership thing. Why should I? And when you're
    >> (finally) a lecturer you get to spend more time doing teaching and admin than
    >> research. While still having to produce the same amount of research
    >> or you won't do well in the RAE.


    >For all their imperfections, the govt research labs do seem to have a
    >significant edge over universities - higher salaries, better working
    >conditions, no teaching, many more 'permanent' positions - although
    >nothing is really permanent these days, at least there are some
    >procedures and some redundancy pay for those who do lose their jobs. I
    >worked in a university briefly once and thought it was shit.


    In my case they even managed to make me a lecturer on a temporary contract
    ;)
    Which was long enough to make me realise that lecturer is not my thing,
    and that the alternative is that series of RA contracts. Which is a waste
    of time and money as well, out of our 3 year project we seem to spend most
    of the last year on writing grant proposals and looking for jobs.

    So to reduce my income and job security I'm now thinking about starting
    another degree :)

    On the geekness: I should probably raise my hand - physicist originally,
    PhD climate research (bowes to James), followed by faffing about with
    internet things and eventually getting paid for it, now research into
    applications for special user groups. Increasingly tired of computers and
    sceptic about the effect of anything I do in university on what
    happens outside, so now looking at a degree in forensic anthropology.

    Roos
     
  20. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    On 2004-07-29, Arthur Clune <[email protected]> wrote:
    > James Annan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >: For all their imperfections, the govt research labs do seem to have a
    >: significant edge over universities - higher salaries, better working
    >: conditions, no teaching, many more 'permanent' positions - although
    >
    > My friends that work at the CSL lab near here get paid less than Uni
    > researchers, but indeed have permnant jobs and no teaching.


    Note that the non-contributory pension is worth about 6% of salary.
    Of course there can be some anomalies but it does seem like a
    generally less demeaning environment. IMO of course (and with a
    permanent position in a UK lab!).

    James
    --
    my other signature is witty
     
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