German Team Jerseys

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Steve McGinty, Oct 8, 2003.

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  1. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Howard Kveck wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Kurgan Gringioni"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> I have an old Bridgeport mill, but I have no idea WTF Prussian Blue is.
    >>
    >> (obviously I'm not steeped in machinist lore)
    >
    > It's also known as "Dykem": layout fluid. Easiest way to describe it is very thin, blue (or
    > sometimes red) paint. Apply it and let it dry, then scribe layout lines, etc. The lines will be
    > easier to see than they would be on raw metal. As was described, it doesn't get a lot of use
    > anymore. It is moving into the "lore" category of machining.

    Also, first of the artificial pigments. Still used in artwork.
     


  2. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Howard Kveck wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>, "Kurgan Gringioni"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>
    > >> I have an old Bridgeport mill, but I have no idea WTF Prussian Blue is.
    > >>
    > >> (obviously I'm not steeped in machinist lore)
    > >
    > > It's also known as "Dykem": layout fluid. Easiest way to describe it is very thin, blue (or
    > > sometimes red) paint. Apply it and let it dry, then scribe layout lines, etc. The lines will
    > > be easier to see than they would be on raw metal. As was described, it doesn't get a lot of
    > > use anymore. It is moving into the "lore" category of machining.
    >
    > Also, first of the artificial pigments. Still used in artwork.

    Interesting, I didn't know that. As packaged for use on metal, it does behave rather differently
    than paint. When you brush it on, the liquid "carrier" (for lack of a better word right now)
    rapidly evaporates, leaving just the pigment adhered firmly to the metal. If you do it right,
    it's a very thin layer that doesn't flake when you scribe in it.

    --
    tanx, Howard

    "We've reached a higher spiritual plane, that is so high I can't explain We tell jokes to make you
    laugh, we play sports so we don't get fat..." The Dictators

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  3. Aruno

    Aruno Guest

    Steve McGinty <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Why are they predominantly blue?
    >
    > Regards! Stephen

    Because the sponsor HEW ( Hamburg Electricty Werke ) has blue as its color.
     
  4. On 11 Oct 2003 04:07:08 -0700, [email protected] (Aruno) wrote:

    >Steve McGinty <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Why are they predominantly blue?
    >>
    >> Regards! Stephen
    >
    >Because the sponsor HEW ( Hamburg Electricty Werke ) has blue as its color.

    Thanks for that.

    Regards! Stephen
     
  5. Steven Woo

    Steven Woo Guest

    On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 15:15:29 +0100, Steve McGinty <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 11 Oct 2003 04:07:08 -0700, [email protected] (Aruno) wrote:
    >
    >>Steve McGinty <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:<[email protected]>...
    >>> Why are they predominantly blue?
    >>>
    >>> Regards! Stephen
    >>
    >>Because the sponsor HEW ( Hamburg Electricty Werke ) has blue as its color.
    >
    >Thanks for that.
    >
    >Regards! Stephen
    Why the paucity of sponsors on US national teams jerseys as opposed to the billboards we see on the
    Spanish/Dutch/German/French teams (off the top of my head)? I know there's a conflict between
    national team sponsor and rider team sponsors but at least they could fund the riders expenses for
    the worlds.
     
  6. Howard Kveck wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Kurgan Gringioni"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>I have an old Bridgeport mill, but I have no idea WTF Prussian Blue is.
    >>
    >>(obviously I'm not steeped in machinist lore)
    >
    >
    > It's also known as "Dykem": layout fluid. Easiest way to describe it is very thin, blue (or
    > sometimes red) paint. Apply it and let it dry, then scribe layout lines, etc. The lines will be
    > easier to see than they would be on raw metal. As was described, it doesn't get a lot of use
    > anymore. It is moving into the "lore" category of machining.
    >

    Ah, yeah. This brings back memories of Metal Shop in Jr. HS. We applied the stuff (actually I
    think we had it in spray cans) and scribed our projects before cutting and bending, etc. There was
    something we could clean it off with later, which probably has since been linked to cancer or
    other malady.
     
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