Gerson Cancer Treatment

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by [email protected], Dec 20, 2003.

  1. Quite a few years ago (like maybe 30+), I read a book called "Death Be
    Not Proud". A Dr. Max Gerson treated the author's (John Gunther,a very
    well-known writer in the 1940s & 1950s) teenage son for cancer,
    primarily with a special diet (seems like he was almost starving the
    kid. Unfortunately, the boy lived only a relatively short time after
    being diagnosed. I don't recall what other treatments, if any, were
    tried.

    Anywy, I'm hearing the name Gerson a lot lately in connection with kinds
    of cancer treatment theory & wondered if there was some relation?
     
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  2. john

    john Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Quite a few years ago (like maybe 30+), I read a book called "Death Be
    > Not Proud". A Dr. Max Gerson treated the author's (John Gunther,a very
    > well-known writer in the 1940s & 1950s) teenage son for cancer,
    > primarily with a special diet (seems like he was almost starving the
    > kid. Unfortunately, the boy lived only a relatively short time after
    > being diagnosed. I don't recall what other treatments, if any, were
    > tried.
    >
    > Anywy, I'm hearing the name Gerson a lot lately in connection with kinds
    > of cancer treatment theory & wondered if there was some relation?



    Relation to what. Gerson is similar to Kelley, the best cancer
    treatments available today http://www.whale.to/cancer/therapies.html
     
  3. [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >Quite a few years ago (like maybe 30+), I read a book called "Death Be
    >Not Proud". A Dr. Max Gerson treated the author's (John Gunther,a very
    >well-known writer in the 1940s & 1950s) teenage son for cancer,
    >primarily with a special diet (seems like he was almost starving the
    >kid. Unfortunately, the boy lived only a relatively short time after
    >being diagnosed. I don't recall what other treatments, if any, were
    >tried.
    >
    >Anywy, I'm hearing the name Gerson a lot lately in connection with kinds
    >of cancer treatment theory & wondered if there was some relation?


    It's the same. Same quackery. Same results.

    --
    Peter Bowditch
    The Millenium Project http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles
    The Green Light http://www.ratbags.com/greenlight
    and The New Improved Quintessence of the Loon with added Vitamins and C-Q10 http://www.ratbags.com/loon
    To email me use my first name only at ratbags.com
     
  4. Orac

    Orac Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (john) wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Quite a few years ago (like maybe 30+), I read a book called "Death Be
    > > Not Proud". A Dr. Max Gerson treated the author's (John Gunther,a very
    > > well-known writer in the 1940s & 1950s) teenage son for cancer,
    > > primarily with a special diet (seems like he was almost starving the
    > > kid. Unfortunately, the boy lived only a relatively short time after
    > > being diagnosed. I don't recall what other treatments, if any, were
    > > tried.
    > >
    > > Anywy, I'm hearing the name Gerson a lot lately in connection with kinds
    > > of cancer treatment theory & wondered if there was some relation?

    >
    >
    > Relation to what. Gerson is similar to Kelley, the best cancer
    > treatments available today http://www.whale.to/cancer/therapies.html


    Wrong. Neither have been shown to be effective.

    --
    Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
    |
    |"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you
    | inconvenience me with questions?"
     
  5. Jan

    Jan Guest

    >Subject: Re: Gerson Cancer Treatment
    >From: Peter Bowditch [email protected]
    >Date: 12/21/2003 8:32 PM Central Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Quite a few years ago (like maybe 30+), I read a book called "Death Be
    >>Not Proud". A Dr. Max Gerson treated the author's (John Gunther,a very
    >>well-known writer in the 1940s & 1950s) teenage son for cancer,
    >>primarily with a special diet (seems like he was almost starving the
    >>kid. Unfortunately, the boy lived only a relatively short time after
    >>being diagnosed. I don't recall what other treatments, if any, were
    >>tried.
    >>
    >>Anywy, I'm hearing the name Gerson a lot lately in connection with kinds
    >>of cancer treatment theory & wondered if there was some relation?

    >
    >It's the same. Same quackery. Same results.


    Peter's definition of quackery is *anything* not endorsed by *organized
    medicine.*

    If one is interested, they should do their own research.

    http://www.gerson.org/g_therapy/default.asp

    Jan
     
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