Gettin out of the saddle

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by ClimbingBeast, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. ClimbingBeast

    ClimbingBeast New Member

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    Hey guys, quick question if u dont mind, im 17, 6'2 184 and have been riding for about 2 years now. I ride with a team of guys who are about 10-20 years older then me and are rockin the 2,500$ bikes and then theres me. When we ride on the flats I usually on the back praying that I wont loose the guy infront of me due to the fact that his wheel is whats keeping me alive. But when we hit a hill I'm always the one whos doing the leading, none of us can figure out why but on hills I can just rip up them(even the long ones =p) But just a quick question when I come out of the saddle Im leaning forward alot and I'm wondering if it would be better to keep my rear back a little more and my peddle stroke, Im kickin down and pulling up, almost snapping my heal at the bottom of my stroke. If you could get back to me that would be great, if not well that sucks Have a good one all.:D
     
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  2. cycleboy

    cycleboy Guest

    Yeah. My advice is be thankful the problem's not the other way around.:p

    Don't worry your body (sense of balance) will choose the correct lean angle based on your speed and the incline. However, you should strive for a smooth pedal rotation whether standing or seated. Less energy wasted.
     
  3. Brizza

    Brizza New Member

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    If you were MTB then the front/back balance would be important for grip, otherwise it really doesn't mean much on the road.

    I stay seated for climbs so i can use the pull in my hamies, standing uses a different muscle group so is good for a change.

    Sounds like you enjoy hills, keep on

    Brian
     
  4. Jakey

    Jakey New Member

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    Do whatever works the best... Just try to keep a smooth stroke... If you waste less energy on the hills, maybe they won't be able to catch back up to you on the flats ;)
     
  5. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Sounds like you've got plenty of strength (good power-to-weight ratio) for climbing. The older guys are probably beating you up on the flats with aerobic endurance; they run lower HRs and can cruise longer due to all the miles and seasons they've ridden. Just keep hanging on to the pack and you'll improve....as long as they let you suck wheels without taking your pull!
     
  6. vitiris

    vitiris New Member

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  7. firegooroo

    firegooroo New Member

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    If you want to try some thing on climbs when off the saddle I try to be back enough so when I rock the bike it touches either side of my inner thigh. Just a thought. It keeps me balance and even weight distribution.
     
  8. edd

    edd New Member

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    sounds like the old guys a pretty smart....
    in time you'll lose them on the flate too..... maybe...
     
  9. Fixey

    Fixey New Member

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    im 178cm (5'10ish) and 120kg (280 odd)
    I can roll along flats no probs but oh god them hiils :(
    I would trade places anytime.
    Style wise....smooth is good but if your whippin em up the just keep going :D
     
  10. edd

    edd New Member

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    I like to climb butt just off the saddle

    ... that should read, "when I really need the power, I climb butt just off the saddle".

    ... I don't really like it

    ... maybe I like it a bit

    ... maybe a bit more then a bit

    ....somebody hit me please...
     
  11. keydates

    keydates New Member

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    What is generally a "good" height-to-weight ratio for cycling?
     
  12. Michuel

    Michuel New Member

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    The usual measure of overweightness is BMI which is (weight in kilogrm squared) divided by (height in centimetres) eg 60kg, 174cm has BMI of 60^2/174=20.7. This is because medical population studies have shown consistent relationship between that and goodhealth, diseases.

    % Body fat is a closer relevance particularly for athletes and there isn't a close consistent relationship between bodyfat and BMI across people.

    For TdF riders BMI varies between 19 and 23 from memory. Dave Cowie did a couple of studies where he published for Name, Height, Weight, BMI for example these riders:-


    PANTANI Marco 1.72 56 18.9292
    CASAGRANDE Francesco 1.72 64 21.6333
    HAMILTON Tyler 1.72 67 22.6474
    REBELLIN Davide 1.72 67 22.6474

    Other studies have quoted BMI's for climbers at 19-20 or TTers/rouleurs at 22.
     
  13. velomanct

    velomanct New Member

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    that formula doesn't make sense. so lance would have a BMI of 27? (70kg and 1.8meters) that's a lot higher than 20, and he is one of the best climbers.
    there is a mistake in your formula. you say hamilton is 1.72meters and 67kg. 67^2/172=26.098 not 22.6474
     
  14. chr

    chr New Member

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    Yes, the correct formula for BMI is weight/height in meters squared. So mine would be 60/1,7^2=20,76.
     
  15. keydates

    keydates New Member

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    I guess my BMI is 19.51 then.
     
  16. frenk

    frenk New Member

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    AFAIK there's no way to calculate BMI with such a simple formula. There are lots of parameters you loose.
    Let a doctor measure that.

    Francesco
    --
     
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