Getting a new to me bike..any advice?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by biggziff, May 11, 2006.

  1. biggziff

    biggziff Guest

    Used to ride often on my Trek bonded aluminum MTB (mostly road riding)
    and decided to start riding again. Also decided that a mid-high end
    used road bike would be my choice. My buddy has a 2000 Trek 5500 that
    he's ridden all of 200 miles in DC and he's decided that he no longer
    has use for it (other than a decoration) Apparently, he paid something
    between $4K and $5K for it (he usually buys the "best" of whatever he
    buys) back in 2000. I'm wondering if this is a good bike for someone
    who is just getting back into riding, if there are any things to be
    aware of with this model, etc. I know he has said that the frame is
    "tall" (whatever that means) but he and I are about the same height
    (6'1") and build.

    Given that the bike hasn't been ridden in a while, but has been stored
    in his living room are there any things that might need attention?

    Any opinions on what this bike is worth?

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts in regards to my questions.
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > Given that the bike hasn't been ridden in a while, but has been stored
    > in his living room are there any things that might need attention?


    Tubes. Chain probably needs a good lubing as well, as will the cables,
    axles, and the rest of the drivetrain.

    Was it stored on the ground, or on a rack? If the former, the tires
    could have formed flat spots, depending on how long it sat and how good
    the tires on it are now (I presume high-quality, given the model). Check
    them out for good measure.

    --

    __o Kristian Zoerhoff
    _'\(,_ [email protected]
    (_)/ (_)
     
  3. biggziff

    biggziff Guest

    Believe it or not...he had it hung on the wall as "artwork" along with
    a silver MF5 (Maynard Ferguson signature model) Stradavarius Bach
    trumpet

    Any suggestions on tubes or tires? I'd like to have some spares on
    hand. I live in a rural area, lots of hills, will be riding mostly
    backtop, but some roads are tar and stone (small gravel embedded in a
    tar base).

    Anyone have a "kit" list of must have items to be taken along in a pack
    when riding (tools, tubes, etc)

    Thanks
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > Any suggestions on tubes or tires? I'd like to have some spares on
    > hand. I live in a rural area, lots of hills, will be riding mostly
    > backtop, but some roads are tar and stone (small gravel embedded in a
    > tar base).


    I live in a semi-rural area, and after patching yet another flat
    recently, I'm starting to lean towards getting some Slime tubes and
    Continental GatorSkins myself, but haven't pulled the trigger yet. Any
    users of these out there want to chime in? You'll be pitching to me as
    well :)

    > Anyone have a "kit" list of must have items to be taken along in a pack
    > when riding (tools, tubes, etc)


    I have a kit that came with my Topeak wedge pack, which contains:

    * Patches (4 of them, originally)
    * Small metal file to work the tube for patching
    * Patch glue
    * Tire irons (2, but 3 would be better)
    * Chain breaker/splicer
    * 2 Small flat-head wrenches for hard-to-reach bolts
    * Multi-tool with screwdriver heads and 4 different sized Allen heads

    I've supplemented this with:

    * A few spare chain links
    * A spoke wrench
    * A spare tube (2 wouldn't hurt, but my pack is getting pretty full :)
    * Swiss army knife (with my bike lock and house keys attached)
    * Pepper spray

    I also carry a mini pump (currently an old Schraeder-head Mt. Zefal,
    soon to be a new Topeak Road Morph), and a Presta-Schraeder adapter,
    just in case.

    Oh, and a pair of bungee cords on my trunk rack (Trek Interchange), for
    large items (or for taking the bike on board a commuter train and
    securing properly).

    --

    __o Kristian Zoerhoff
    _'\(,_ [email protected]
    (_)/ (_)
     
  5. > Used to ride often on my Trek bonded aluminum MTB (mostly road riding)
    > and decided to start riding again. Also decided that a mid-high end
    > used road bike would be my choice. My buddy has a 2000 Trek 5500 that
    > he's ridden all of 200 miles in DC and he's decided that he no longer
    > has use for it (other than a decoration) Apparently, he paid something
    > between $4K and $5K for it (he usually buys the "best" of whatever he
    > buys) back in 2000. I'm wondering if this is a good bike for someone
    > who is just getting back into riding, if there are any things to be
    > aware of with this model, etc. I know he has said that the frame is
    > "tall" (whatever that means) but he and I are about the same height
    > (6'1") and build.
    >
    > Given that the bike hasn't been ridden in a while, but has been stored
    > in his living room are there any things that might need attention?
    >
    > Any opinions on what this bike is worth?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any thoughts in regards to my questions.


    The bike in question probably sold for about $3400, not $4-5k, but not a
    small chunk of change either. Nice machine, but was not available in a
    triple option (nor easy to convert) so if that's a requirement, you're
    looking at a lot of extra expense. Obviously 200 miles are generally
    insignificant for a bike, unless the bike was run into something... check it
    over *very* carefully. Look for any dings in the paint even.

    Sizing is very important, and goes beyond just getting the proper frame
    size. At 6'1", we know that you take either a 60 or 62cm. The magic of
    proper fit is largely accomplished by getting the right distance between the
    seat and handlebars, as well as the correct amount of drop (difference in
    height between seat and bars). This after first making sure the seat is in a
    reasonable position in terms of fore/aft setting.

    If you have access to a shop that's known to do a good job with bike fit,
    you might see what they charge for their services and see first, if the bike
    can be set up properly for you and, if it can, have it done.

    But as for suitability, if you don't need a triple crankset and aren't
    planning to ride gravel roads all day long, a 5500 would be a very nice
    bike. There's nothing about it that makes it high-strung in a way that would
    be inappropriate for a novice rider. It's handling isn't twitchy at all, and
    you can tame it a bit with 25c tires instead of the stock 23c.

    One thing to keep in mind though is that Trek's lifetime warranty, like most
    others I've seen, is for the original owner only. This reduces its used
    value a fair amount, so plan accordingly in terms of what you're willing to
    pay.

    Hope this helps-

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    "biggziff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Used to ride often on my Trek bonded aluminum MTB (mostly road riding)
    > and decided to start riding again. Also decided that a mid-high end
    > used road bike would be my choice. My buddy has a 2000 Trek 5500 that
    > he's ridden all of 200 miles in DC and he's decided that he no longer
    > has use for it (other than a decoration) Apparently, he paid something
    > between $4K and $5K for it (he usually buys the "best" of whatever he
    > buys) back in 2000. I'm wondering if this is a good bike for someone
    > who is just getting back into riding, if there are any things to be
    > aware of with this model, etc. I know he has said that the frame is
    > "tall" (whatever that means) but he and I are about the same height
    > (6'1") and build.
    >
    > Given that the bike hasn't been ridden in a while, but has been stored
    > in his living room are there any things that might need attention?
    >
    > Any opinions on what this bike is worth?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any thoughts in regards to my questions.
    >
     
  6. biggziff

    biggziff Guest

    Thanks, but I don't have a clue what a triple crankset is or why I
    would want one. Perhaps you could elaborate?

    My cost is the cost to ship it here. Under $200. It's a guy I grew up
    with that has done *very* well for himself.

    I suppose if the frame were ever to become damaged I could have him
    handle the warranty.

    Thanks for the information.
     
  7. > Thanks, but I don't have a clue what a triple crankset is or why I
    > would want one. Perhaps you could elaborate?


    Sorry, I shouldn't speak in jargon. A "triple" means there are three
    chainrings up front, on the crankset. The third chainring is a small one,
    that gives you really low gears for getting up steep hills with less strain.

    > My cost is the cost to ship it here. Under $200. It's a guy I grew up
    > with that has done *very* well for himself.


    You've got virtually nothing to lose. No question you can sell it for more
    than that if need be, and if you really like it but had to spend $700 to
    modify it to be your perfect bike, you're still in GREAT shape.

    > I suppose if the frame were ever to become damaged I could have him
    > handle the warranty.


    True, but it's such a great deal this isn't something to worry about.

    > Thanks for the information.


    No problem. Good luck!

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    "biggziff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Thanks, but I don't have a clue what a triple crankset is or why I
    > would want one. Perhaps you could elaborate?
    >
    > My cost is the cost to ship it here. Under $200. It's a guy I grew up
    > with that has done *very* well for himself.
    >
    > I suppose if the frame were ever to become damaged I could have him
    > handle the warranty.
    >
    > Thanks for the information.
    >
     
  8. C A III A

    C A III A Guest

    "biggziff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Thanks, but I don't have a clue what a triple crankset is or why I
    > would want one. Perhaps you could elaborate?
    >
    > My cost is the cost to ship it here. Under $200. It's a guy I grew up
    > with that has done *very* well for himself.
    >


    Can he ship it to me? I'll pay double. Point is. Get it now! If you don't
    like it, sell it and earn a grand on it. Post link to pictures of it,
    interesting to see how it looks.
     
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