Getting breading to stick to meat

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ken Knecht, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. Ken Knecht

    Ken Knecht Guest

    What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    no better. What's the secret? Egg?

    TIA

    --
    Untie the two knots to email me

    A trillion here, a trillion there,
    pretty soon you're talking real money.
     
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  2. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Ken Knecht wrote:
    > What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    > such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    > baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    > no better. What's the secret? Egg?


    First dust with flour, then coat with egg, then dredge in crumbs... the
    flour becomes the glue.

    Sheldon
     
  3. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Ken Knecht wrote:

    > What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    > such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    > baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    > no better. What's the secret? Egg?



    Dry, then wet, then dry. In this case that translates to dip
    it in flour, then egg, then seasoned breading.

    <http://www.diynet.com/diy/lc_bread/article/0,2041,DIY_13998_2273961,00.html>

    --
    Reg
     
  4. Peter A

    Peter A Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    > such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    > baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    > no better. What's the secret? Egg?
    >
    >


    My usual approach, which works well, is to coat with flour, then egg,
    then the breading. Let sit uncovered on a rack for a while before
    cooking to improve adhesion.


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths pages at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  5. T

    T Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Ken Knecht wrote:
    >
    > > What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    > > such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    > > baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    > > no better. What's the secret? Egg?

    >
    >
    > Dry, then wet, then dry. In this case that translates to dip
    > it in flour, then egg, then seasoned breading.
    >
    > <http://www.diynet.com/diy/lc_bread/article/0,2041,DIY_13998_2273961,00.html>
    >
    >


    Thanks for that link. I've forever been doing dry/wet/dry but noticed
    that the coating slipped off the meat when you'd cut into it, etc.

    I think that 20 minute rest solidifies some of the fats in the egg and
    then they come out slowly during cooking. Otherwise they just provide a
    layer of lubricant for the breading to slip off.

    As to the eggs - I generally use one whole egg and the whites of two
    other eggs. Seem to get the right consistency with that. And I never
    thought of running it through the egg again and then re-dredging in
    breadcrumbs.
     
  6. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Ken Knecht wrote:

    > What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    > such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    > baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    > no better. What's the secret? Egg?


    For chicken, dredge it in seasoned flour, then dip in an egg wash, and then
    seasoned crumbs. It also helps to do it a bit ahead and let them sit for a
    while so the egg dries and sticks.
     
  7. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 28 Mar 2006 09:05:01 -0800, "Sheldon" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Ken Knecht wrote:
    >> What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    >> such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    >> baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    >> no better. What's the secret? Egg?

    >
    >First dust with flour, then coat with egg, then dredge in crumbs... the
    >flour becomes the glue.


    I don't mess with the flour. I just use well beaten eggs (or just
    the whites, saving yolks for mayo or sauces) with a little water.

    If I were compelled to use white stuff, it would be cornstarch
    instead.

    -sw
     
  8. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:

    > I don't mess with the flour. I just use well beaten eggs (or just
    > the whites, saving yolks for mayo or sauces) with a little water.
    >
    > If I were compelled to use white stuff, it would be cornstarch
    > instead.


    I started experimenting with cornstarch after you suggested
    it. Must have been a few years back. It works well when you
    want to lighten up on the coating and emphasize the main
    ingredient. I use it mostly on seafood now.

    --
    Reg
     
  9. Use egg



    Ken Knecht wrote:
    > What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    > such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    > baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    > no better. What's the secret? Egg?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > --
    > Untie the two knots to email me
    >
    > A trillion here, a trillion there,
    > pretty soon you're talking real money.
     
  10. Mary Hogan

    Mary Hogan Guest

    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Ken Knecht wrote:
    >
    >> What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    >> such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    >> baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    >> no better. What's the secret? Egg?

    >
    > For chicken, dredge it in seasoned flour, then dip in an egg wash, and
    > then
    > seasoned crumbs. It also helps to do it a bit ahead and let them sit for a
    > while so the egg dries and sticks.


    I don't understand this, I dip my fried chicken in milk and then seasoned
    flour then into hot oil. It sticks beautifully every time. This has got to
    have something to do with the pan...I use a big chicken frier, Wolfgang
    Puck... And the temperature. I start out at high checking with a little
    flour, then I turn it down to medium high...watching it carefully...and when
    it is brown as I like it I remove it to an uncovered baking pan, each piece
    separated from the other, not touching, sprinkle on Onion powder (not
    covered, but count to seven as you shake it on the chicken) and I bake it
    for about 50 minutes at 350.

    Do not cover it in the oven or it will not be crunchy.

    For my seasoned flour, I use two to three cups of flour..I always have extra
    for future...a pack of "Good Seasons" Italian salad dressing seasoning, or
    Hidden Valley ranch dry seasoning pack...my fav is good seasons. Lots of
    Salt (taste it dry, it should be salty to the taste) and pepper.
    I put this mixture in a plastic baggy. I pull out a small platter dish, add
    some of the mix to the platter and first dip the chicken parts in milk, then
    the mix. I add more of the flour mix as needed. You should have enough for
    two chickens. If I make only one, I'm prepared for the next dinner.

    I have always come up with crunchy, coated, beautiful fried chicken with
    this recipe.



    >
    >




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  11. aem

    aem Guest

    Ken Knecht wrote:
    > What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    > such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    > baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    > no better. What's the secret? Egg?
    >

    As several others have pointed out, flour then egg then crumbs is the
    standard. If you don't want all that, though, don't wet your cutlets
    or chicken before breading them. Use paper towels instead of water or
    milk. Then press the crumbs in as firmly as you can. It may seem
    counterintuitive but it works better than what you apparently have been
    trying. -aem
     
  12. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2006-03-28, T <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thanks for that link. I've forever been doing dry/wet/dry but noticed
    > that the coating slipped off the meat when you'd cut into it, etc.



    The one tip I learned is, during the first dry dredge, make
    sure you shake loose any *excess* flour (or whatever). If the item to
    be dredged is too wet, the flour will cake on. Knock this excess off.
    Making sure the item to dredge has been patted dry of excess moisture,
    blood, etc, helps.

    nb
     
  13. On Tue 28 Mar 2006 11:49:54a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Reg?

    > Steve Wertz wrote:
    >
    >> I don't mess with the flour. I just use well beaten eggs (or just
    >> the whites, saving yolks for mayo or sauces) with a little water.
    >>
    >> If I were compelled to use white stuff, it would be cornstarch
    >> instead.

    >
    > I started experimenting with cornstarch after you suggested
    > it. Must have been a few years back. It works well when you
    > want to lighten up on the coating and emphasize the main
    > ingredient. I use it mostly on seafood now.


    For most things I use a mixture of cornstarch and flour for the extra
    crispness the cornstarch provides.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
  14. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2006-03-28, T <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for that link. I've forever been doing dry/wet/dry but noticed
    >> that the coating slipped off the meat when you'd cut into it, etc.

    >
    >
    > The one tip I learned is, during the first dry dredge, make
    > sure you shake loose any *excess* flour (or whatever). If the item to
    > be dredged is too wet, the flour will cake on. Knock this excess off.
    > Making sure the item to dredge has been patted dry of excess moisture,
    > blood, etc, helps.
    >
    > nb


    I've noticed when meat has been dredged, if when you put it in the skillet
    it isn't 'really' hot, the coating will eventually fall off. Make sure
    your skillet is still hot when you turn the object of your desire.
    Dee Dee
     
  15. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > On Tue 28 Mar 2006 11:49:54a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Reg?
    >
    >
    >>Steve Wertz wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I don't mess with the flour. I just use well beaten eggs (or just
    >>>the whites, saving yolks for mayo or sauces) with a little water.
    >>>
    >>>If I were compelled to use white stuff, it would be cornstarch
    >>>instead.

    >>
    >>I started experimenting with cornstarch after you suggested
    >>it. Must have been a few years back. It works well when you
    >>want to lighten up on the coating and emphasize the main
    >>ingredient. I use it mostly on seafood now.

    >
    >
    > For most things I use a mixture of cornstarch and flour for the extra
    > crispness the cornstarch provides.
    >


    I'll try that one. Thanks.

    --
    Reg
     
  16. Peter A

    Peter A Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > > For chicken, dredge it in seasoned flour, then dip in an egg wash, and
    > > then
    > > seasoned crumbs. It also helps to do it a bit ahead and let them sit for a
    > > while so the egg dries and sticks.

    >
    > I don't understand this, I dip my fried chicken in milk and then seasoned
    > flour then into hot oil. It sticks beautifully every time. This has got to
    > have something to do with the pan...I use a big chicken frier, Wolfgang
    > Puck... And the temperature. I start out at high checking with a little
    > flour, then I turn it down to medium high...watching it carefully...and when
    > it is brown as I like it I remove it to an uncovered baking pan, each piece
    > separated from the other, not touching, sprinkle on Onion powder (not
    > covered, but count to seven as you shake it on the chicken) and I bake it
    > for about 50 minutes at 350.
    >
    >
    >


    There's nothing to understand - it's a different recipe. Milk then flour
    is traditional for southern fried chicken but it is not "breading." If
    you want a coating of breadcrumbs then you need to do as advised.


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths pages at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  17. Serene

    Serene Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 16:59:19 GMT, Ken Knecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >What do you use to get the 'breading' - bread crumbs, packaged coating
    >such as Shake'n'Bake, whatever - stick to meat, such as chicken, before
    >baking or frying? I generally use water but this works poorly. Milk works
    >no better. What's the secret? Egg?


    My mom has always done three dips -- bread crumbs, eggs, bread crumbs,
    and her breading stays put.

    serene
     
  18. Ditto previous posts recommending cornflour, egg, breadcrumbs.

    Few years ago experimented with breadcumb additives - have been using
    freshly grated parmesan cheese - 1-2 Tbls to 1 cup fresh breadcrumbs -
    ever since.
    Gives a really nice crust and a delicious taste, whether beef, veal, or
    chicken.
     
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