getting hit by meteors, lightning, cars

  • Thread starter Claire Petersky
  • Start date



Claire Petersky wrote:

> What are the relative statistics for:
>
> Being hit by a meteor


Pretty unlikely. I did hear of a car being hit by a meteor that made the
news last year, but no people. Went through the trunk.

> Being hit by lightning


About 5 or 10 people a year in the US. Not all fatal.

> Being hit by a car while on a bike, bicyclist an adult and not drunk


Too many.

There might be a report on line at the home of the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration, or NHTSA (.gov?).
If Bob Hunt sees this he would be the one to know.
Bill Baka
>
> Thanks!
>
 
Claire Petersky wrote:
> What are the relative statistics for:
>
> Being hit by a meteor
> Being hit by lightning
> Being hit by a car while on a bike, bicyclist an adult and not drunk


You trying to start something?!? :-D
 
Sorni wrote:
> Claire Petersky wrote:
> > What are the relative statistics for:
> >
> > Being hit by a meteor
> > Being hit by lightning
> > Being hit by a car while on a bike, bicyclist an adult and not drunk

>
> You trying to start something?!? :-D


More to the point, have you hit the Trifecta?
 
On Mon, 08 May 2006 17:58:28 -0700, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

>Claire Petersky wrote:
>
>> Being hit by lightning

>
>About 5 or 10 people a year in the US. Not all fatal.


Only in Bakaville. According to
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/05/0522_030522_lightning.html
there's 73 fatalities per year in the U.S. According to
http://www.strikealert.com/LightningFacts.htm that's 200 deaths per
year, but that's a FEMA statistic, so they were sitting by their fax
machines guessing instead of out collecting statistics. :/

Pat

Email address works as is.
 
Sorni wrote:
> Claire Petersky wrote:
>> What are the relative statistics for:
>>
>> Being hit by a meteor
>> Being hit by lightning
>> Being hit by a car while on a bike, bicyclist an adult and not drunk

>
> You trying to start something?!? :-D
>
>

A new helmet standard: Meteor-proof, with a lightning rod & grounding strap.


--
John Calnan
http://www.calnan-web.com/weblog
 
Patrick Lamb wrote:

> On Mon, 08 May 2006 17:58:28 -0700, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>Claire Petersky wrote:
>>
>>> Being hit by lightning

>>
>>About 5 or 10 people a year in the US. Not all fatal.

>
> Only in Bakaville. According to
> http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/05/0522_030522_lightning.html
> there's 73 fatalities per year in the U.S. According to
> http://www.strikealert.com/LightningFacts.htm that's 200 deaths per
> year, but that's a FEMA statistic, so they were sitting by their fax
> machines guessing instead of out collecting statistics. :/
>
> Pat
>
> Email address works as is.


My number was off the top of my head as I remembered it from oh,...grade
school, so ooooops, sorry. There were a lot less people back in the 50's
and they usually knew enough to get in out of the storm. You can get
trapped in a bad spot though, as I found out when a storm hit when I was in
the middle of a lake and had to get flat inside an aluminum boat. I can't
argue with 200 per year given that we have almost 300 million walking
around. I don't think the records were that great when I was in school?????
Bill Baka
 
John Calnan wrote:
> Sorni wrote:
>> Claire Petersky wrote:
>>> What are the relative statistics for:
>>>
>>> Being hit by a meteor
>>> Being hit by lightning
>>> Being hit by a car while on a bike, bicyclist an adult and not drunk

>>
>> You trying to start something?!? :-D
>>
>>

> A new helmet standard: Meteor-proof, with a lightning rod & grounding
> strap.


And maybe a breathalyzer sticking out the back?

Bill "just add a force field, and we're ON to something here" S.
 
Bill wrote:
> Patrick Lamb wrote:
>
>
>>On Mon, 08 May 2006 17:58:28 -0700, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Claire Petersky wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Being hit by lightning
>>>
>>>About 5 or 10 people a year in the US. Not all fatal.

>>
>>Only in Bakaville. According to
>>http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/05/0522_030522_lightning.html
>>there's 73 fatalities per year in the U.S. According to
>>http://www.strikealert.com/LightningFacts.htm that's 200 deaths per
>>year, but that's a FEMA statistic, so they were sitting by their fax
>>machines guessing instead of out collecting statistics. :/
>>
>>Pat
>>
>>Email address works as is.

>
>
> My number was off the top of my head as I remembered it from oh,...grade
> school, so ooooops, sorry. There were a lot less people back in the 50's
> and they usually knew enough to get in out of the storm. You can get
> trapped in a bad spot though, as I found out when a storm hit when I was in
> the middle of a lake and had to get flat inside an aluminum boat. I can't
> argue with 200 per year given that we have almost 300 million walking
> around. I don't think the records were that great when I was in school?????
> Bill Baka
>


Lying flat in the boat is more dangerous than crouching in
the bottom, preferably on one foot. :) The problem with
lying flat is that there can be quite a charge differential
between your head and feet, and that can generate a current
that will interfere with the electricity of your heartbeat.

Lightning is one of *the* meteorological killers. I believe
it's exceeded only by heatwaves.

Scott
 
Bill wrote:
> Claire Petersky wrote:
>
> > What are the relative statistics for:
> >
> > Being hit by a meteor

>
> Pretty unlikely. I did hear of a car being hit by a meteor that made the
> news last year, but no people. Went through the trunk.


Cars and houses get hit on a fairly routine basis (a least a few per
decade). There was a report of a girl in the UK who was hit on her foot
by a meteor a few years ago.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2218755.stm
 
Mike Causer wrote:
> On Mon, 08 May 2006 20:17:01 -0700, John Calnan wrote:
>
>> A new helmet standard: Meteor-proof, with a lightning rod & grounding
>> strap.

>
> Like this? http://www.sheldonbrown.com/eagle.html
>
> Sheldon Brown:: always ahead of the trend.....


Also, /a head/ of the trend.

:-D
 
These might help



"Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> What are the relative statistics for:
>
> Being hit by a meteor


http://www.popculturemadness.com/Trivia/Bits/Death-Odds.html

Asteroid or Meteor Impact odds: 1-in-500,000

> Being hit by lightning


http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/medical.htm

Odds of being struck by lightning in a given year (reported deaths +
injuries) 1/700,000
Odds of being struck by lightning in a given year (estimated total deaths +
injuries) 1/240,000
Odds of being struck in your lifetime (Est. 80 years) 1/3000


Lightning X-33

Deaths 664

Lifetime Odds [1 in...] 362,746

Lifetime Odds [1 in...] 56,439,857

> Being hit by a car while on a bike, bicyclist an adult and not drunk



http://www.nsc.org/lrs/statinfo/odds.htm

Pedalcyclist, V10-V19

Deaths 767
One Year Odds [1 in...] 375,412
Lifetime Odds [1 in...] 4857


http://www.benbest.com/lifeext/causes.html#data_usa

MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT (MVA) PERCENT
(1) Between vehicles 43%
(2) With fixed object 27%
(3) Pedestrian 16%
(4) Noncollision 10%
(5) Collision pedacycle 2%
(6) Collision train 1%

50% of MVA deaths were at night
50% of MVA deaths involve intoxicants in driver
62% of MVA deaths were rural
65% OF MVA pedestrian deaths were urban
25% of urban MVA deaths were pedestrian
 
Scott L wrote:

> Bill wrote:
>> Patrick Lamb wrote:
>>
>>
>>>On Mon, 08 May 2006 17:58:28 -0700, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Claire Petersky wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Being hit by lightning
>>>>
>>>>About 5 or 10 people a year in the US. Not all fatal.
>>>
>>>Only in Bakaville. According to
>>>http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/05/0522_030522_lightning.html
>>>there's 73 fatalities per year in the U.S. According to
>>>http://www.strikealert.com/LightningFacts.htm that's 200 deaths per
>>>year, but that's a FEMA statistic, so they were sitting by their fax
>>>machines guessing instead of out collecting statistics. :/
>>>
>>>Pat
>>>
>>>Email address works as is.

>>
>>
>> My number was off the top of my head as I remembered it from oh,...grade
>> school, so ooooops, sorry. There were a lot less people back in the 50's
>> and they usually knew enough to get in out of the storm. You can get
>> trapped in a bad spot though, as I found out when a storm hit when I was
>> in the middle of a lake and had to get flat inside an aluminum boat. I
>> can't argue with 200 per year given that we have almost 300 million
>> walking around. I don't think the records were that great when I was in
>> school????? Bill Baka
>>

>
> Lying flat in the boat is more dangerous than crouching in
> the bottom, preferably on one foot. :) The problem with
> lying flat is that there can be quite a charge differential
> between your head and feet, and that can generate a current
> that will interfere with the electricity of your heartbeat.
>
> Lightning is one of *the* meteorological killers. I believe
> it's exceeded only by heatwaves.
>
> Scott


Getting down inside the boat seemed like the thing to do in a sudden
thunderstorm, especially in Minnesota or Wisconsin where they ambush you by
rolling in over the trees. It was an aluminum boat so it should have been a
good conductor. I wonder what the statistics say about being caught like
that since those two states live on the tourist fishing vacations of people
from Chicago and other big cities during the summer. The charge
differential is what gets people under trees when the tree is hit, as in
going up one leg, through the chest and heart, then down the other leg.
Lightning is not to be messed with, fun to watch but not to be trapped in.
Bill Baka
 
amakyonin wrote:

>
> Bill wrote:
>> Claire Petersky wrote:
>>
>> > What are the relative statistics for:
>> >
>> > Being hit by a meteor

>>
>> Pretty unlikely. I did hear of a car being hit by a meteor that made the
>> news last year, but no people. Went through the trunk.

>
> Cars and houses get hit on a fairly routine basis (a least a few per
> decade). There was a report of a girl in the UK who was hit on her foot
> by a meteor a few years ago.
>
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2218755.stm


Wow!
She is so lucky that most of it burned up. Any larger and she might have
lost that foot. Looking at that makes me wonder if there aren't millions of
little meteorites that hit every year but have so little energy that they
go undetected??? If it had hit a roof it would never have been identified,
just a 'plonk' sound and a new pebble on the ground.
Bill Baka
 
Bill wrote:
> amakyonin wrote:
>
>
>>Bill wrote:
>>
>>>Claire Petersky wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>What are the relative statistics for:
>>>>
>>>>Being hit by a meteor
>>>
>>>Pretty unlikely. I did hear of a car being hit by a meteor that made the
>>>news last year, but no people. Went through the trunk.

>>
>>Cars and houses get hit on a fairly routine basis (a least a few per
>>decade). There was a report of a girl in the UK who was hit on her foot
>>by a meteor a few years ago.
>>
>>http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2218755.stm

>
>
> Wow!
> She is so lucky that most of it burned up. Any larger and she might have
> lost that foot. Looking at that makes me wonder if there aren't millions of
> little meteorites that hit every year but have so little energy that they
> go undetected??? If it had hit a roof it would never have been identified,
> just a 'plonk' sound and a new pebble on the ground.
> Bill Baka
>

almost certainly.. most meteors burn up in the atmosphere and by the
time they hit us they're the size of pebbles, which is probably why we
never even notice. Earth is being hit by meteors all the time.

The last time I remember one hitting our area was about 10 years ago...
it landed in a farm field near the city, and one piece was about the
size of a football, or a bit larger. Apparently some people reported
hearing sort of a screaming noise as it traveled through the atmosphere.
 
"Marlene Blanshay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Bill wrote:
>> amakyonin wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Bill wrote:
>>>
>>>>Claire Petersky wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>What are the relative statistics for:
>>>>>
>>>>>Being hit by a meteor
>>>>
>>>>Pretty unlikely. I did hear of a car being hit by a meteor that made the
>>>>news last year, but no people. Went through the trunk.
>>>
>>>Cars and houses get hit on a fairly routine basis (a least a few per
>>>decade). There was a report of a girl in the UK who was hit on her foot
>>>by a meteor a few years ago.
>>>
>>>http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2218755.stm

>>
>>
>> Wow!
>> She is so lucky that most of it burned up. Any larger and she might have
>> lost that foot. Looking at that makes me wonder if there aren't millions
>> of
>> little meteorites that hit every year but have so little energy that they
>> go undetected???


> almost certainly.. most meteors burn up in the atmosphere and by the time
> they hit us they're the size of pebbles, which is probably why we never
> even notice. Earth is being hit by meteors all the time.


A kid in my daughter's elementary school did his science fair project on
frequency of meteorites in our area. He did small rock samples around the
neighborhood, from streambeds and such. Then he used magnetism as a way to
try to separate out the meteorites as a first pass. Once separated, he used
others ways to identify them as such. It turned out there were plenty. They
mostly were very small, maybe 1/4 - 1/2 cm across, but you could see them
under the magnifying glass, and they looked just like the examples in the
book he had. I thought it was the best science fair project this year.

--
Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky
http://www.bicyclemeditations.org/
See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
 
"Scott L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>> Lying flat in the boat is more dangerous than crouching in

> the bottom, preferably on one foot. :) The problem with
> lying flat is that there can be quite a charge differential
> between your head and feet, and that can generate a current
> that will interfere with the electricity of your heartbeat.
>
> Lightning is one of *the* meteorological killers. I believe
> it's exceeded only by heatwaves.
>
> Scott


That's a tough call. The lake, boat, and your body are at earth
potential. There wouldn't be much potential difference across the
boat skin, certainly much less than across wet earth. It probably
wouldn't be good to stand in the boat either, because you'd then be
the highest altitude piece of grounded conductor within many meters,
aka a lightning rod. Crouching would indeed be better. Perhaps lying
in the foetal position on one's side is best, with your body parts
below the gunwales. Sounds attractive, no?

Ken